"Flame Azalea" by Vicki Dameron , public domain

Blue Ridge

Parkway - NC, VA

The Blue Ridge Parkway is a National Parkway and All-American Road in the United States, noted for its scenic beauty.

maps

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Blue Ridge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/blri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Ridge_Parkway The Blue Ridge Parkway is a National Parkway and All-American Road in the United States, noted for its scenic beauty. A Blue Ridge Parkway experience is unlike any other: a slow-paced and relaxing drive revealing stunning long-range vistas and close-up views of the rugged mountains and pastoral landscapes of the Appalachian Highlands. The Parkway meanders for 469 miles, protecting a diversity of plants and animals, and providing opportunities for enjoying all that makes this region of the country so special. The parkway is a 469-mile-long scenic road connecting Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Numerous federal and state highways provide access to the parkway. Milepost markers are positioned every mile along the parkway, starting at 0 in Virginia and ending at 469 in North Carolina. We suggest using a map to identify the area you want to visit, as GPS directions often do not incorporate the parkway's milepost system. Blue Ridge Music Center The Blue Ridge Music Center celebrates the music and musicians of the Blue Ridge. Established by the U.S. Congress in 1997, with support from The National Council for the Traditional Arts, the Music Center includes an outdoor amphitheater, an indoor theater, and exhibits highlighting the historical significance of the region’s music. The Blue Ridge Parkway Music Center is located at Milepost 213 on the Virginia/North Carolina state border. Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center The visitor center features exhibits that showcase the natural and cultural history of the area, as well as the recreational opportunities offered by the region. Open year-round, the visitor center features Parkway information, an America's National Parks store, and a Blue Ridge National Heritage Area information desk. From I-40, exit at #53 and follow the signs, heading east on US 74A toward Lake Lure and turn right on the Parkway on-ramp. Make a right to head north on the Parkway and turn left up the driveway for the visitor center in less than a mile. If you entered the Parkway from US-25/Hendersonville Rd or NC-191/Brevard Rd, continue north for 10-15 minutes, and turn when you see the visitor center sign. From US-70/Tunnel Rd, drive south about 5 minutes, and turn when you see the visitor center sign. Craggy Gardens Visitor Center The small, historic visitor center and America's National Parks store is nestled in the gap between the rocky, Craggy Mountains. At over 5,000 feet elevation, harsh weather often invades these exposed ridges, resulting in the gnarled forests of beech, birch, and buckeye. These summits have been home to some of the most spectacular rhododendron displays along the Parkway corridor. For generations, visitors have headed up to the Craggies in mid to late June to view the pink and purple blooms. Craggy Gardens is located 20 miles north of our Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center (MP 384) and 18 miles north of the Folk Art Center (MP 382), with the drive taking about a half hour. If you take Ox Creek Rd (MP 375) up from Weaverville it takes about 15 minutes on the Parkway.Craggy Gardens is about a half hour drive south of Mount Mitchell, the tallest mountain in eastern North America. Mount Mitchell's access road (NC-128) turns off the Parkway at MP 355. Doughton Park Visitor Center Numerous hiking options are available in the Doughton Park area and nearby Brinegar Cabin offers insights into mountain living in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Located near Milepost 240 on the Blue Ridge Parkway, approximately 20 miles south of the VA-NC state line. Folk Art Center The Southern Highland Craft Guild hosts a large craft shop, craft demonstrators and upstairs galleries showcasing regional craftspeople. Within the Folk Art Center is also an America's National Parks store and Parkway information desk. From US-70, enter the Parkway and drive Parkway north a 1/4 mile and turn left to enter the Folk Art Center's driveway. If you take I-40, take exit 55 and drive on US-70 west until you reach the Parkway on ramp. If you entered the Parkway at Brevard Rd, NC-191, US-25 or US-74A, drive Parkway north 5-20 minutes. Use caution with GPS directions, as many people end far up Riceville Rd and not at the Folk Art Center. Humpback Rocks Visitor Center Travelers heading south from the northern end of the Parkway experience a scenic drive through an Appalachian hardwood forest with ridge top views of the Shenandoah Valley to the west and Rockfish Valley to the east. The rock outcroppings on the mountain and the relocated collection of 1890s farm buildings where settlers scratched out a living in the rocky soil makes Humpback Rocks perhaps the best representation of the varied combination of natural and cultural features anywhere along the Parkway corridor. James River Visitor Center The James River visitor center offers visitors the opportunity to learn about transportation history in central and southern Appalachia. Linn Cove Viaduct Visitor Center The rugged slopes of Grandfather Mountain proved a challenging task to engineers as they completed the last section of the Parkway here in 1987, 52 years after construction began. To protect the fragile and ecologically sensitive slopes of the mountain, Parkway planners designed the award-winning Linn Cove Viaduct, and the visitor center at MP 304 celebrates this achievement. The beautiful Tanawah Trail runs nearby. Linn Cove Viaduct runs along the side of Grandfather Mountain. The closest entry to the Parkway is where US-221 crosses the Parkway near Linville, NC, at MP 305; drive Parkway north a half mile to get to the visitor center. If you are coming from the Blowing Rock, NC area, drive south 12 miles. Linville Falls Visitor Center The Linville River flows from its headwaters high on the steep slopes of Grandfather Mountain and cascades through two falls as it beings a nearly 2,000 foot descent through this rugged and spectacularly beautiful gorge, carved out by the tall Linville Falls. Towering hemlocks, dense stands of rhododendron, and native wildflowers grow along the trails that begin at the visitor center and encircle the falls. The visitor center is just north of the intersection of the Parkway with US 221 in the Linville Falls area, about 25 miles north of Marion, NC. Turn right and follow the access road for about a mile. Linville Falls is about 45 minutes south of Blowing Rock. Mabry Mill Cultural Site The sights and sounds of rural life in Appalachia resonate at Mabry Mill during the summer and fall. Ed Mabry built this mill, where he and his wife ground corn, sawed lumber, and operated a blacksmith shed for their neighbors for three decades. It was a community gathering place for the folks who called Meadows of Dan their home in the early twentieth century. Milepost 176 on the Blue Ridge Parkway Moses Cone Manor House This visitor center information desk and America's National Parks store share a grand, historic estate with a craft shop operated by the Southern Highland Craft Guild. The visitor information desk and bookstore are open from May through October, while the craft shop is open from early April through November. The estate grounds have 25 miles of carriage roads for strolling, small lakes and other historic structures. From Blowing Rock/Boone, NC, enter the Parkway at Milepost 291.8, where US-321/221 intersect with the Parkway. Boone is 8 Miles away on US-321 south, Blowing Rock is 2 miles away on US-321/221 north. Go south on the Parkway about 2 miles to the Moses H. Cone Estate. If you are driving Parkway North from Asheville, expect to take 2.5 hours to reach the Moses H. Cone Estate. Museum of North Carolina Minerals The Museum of North Carolina Minerals highlights the rich mineral resources & the mining heritage of this portion of the Blue Ridge. The museum is open year-round with interactive & experiential exhibits for children & adults. This area, called Gillespie Gap, was also significant in the American Revolution, where frontiersmen from the mountains known as the "Overmountain Men" crossed the Blue Ridge on their way to battle at Kings Mountain. The Mitchell County Chamber of Commerce has an information desk. The Mineral Museum (MP 331) is located at the junction of the Blue Ridge Parkway and NC-226, about 6 miles east of Spruce Pine and 15 miles west of Marion, NC. It is approximately an hour and a half north of Asheville via the Parkway, or and hour south of Blowing Rock, via the Parkway. Peaks of Otter Visitor Center Visitors of the Peaks of Otter gain a sense of both the history of community and tourism in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The long history of visiting the mountains for health and relaxation is told in the visitor center. An extensive trail system is available with the hike to Sharp Top being a long-standing tradition. Dining and lodging is available, along with fishing in Abbot Lake, camping, and picnicking. Rocky Knob Visitor Center The Rocky Knob area offers a visitor center, campground, and 15 miles of hiking trails, including the Rock Castle Gorge National Recreation Trail. Picturesque Mabry Mill is located just a few miles south of Rocky Knob. Rocky Knob Visitor Center is located on the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 169 Waterrock Knob Visitor Center Waterrock Knob is our highest elevation visitor center on the Parkway. Known for its beautiful long-range views of several major mountain chains in the Appalachians, Waterrock Knob is uniquely suited for viewing sunrises and sunsets. The small visitor center introduces visitors to the area's rugged terrain and tremendous scenic resources, including the Great Smoky Mountains that are visible from here. From Balsam Gap (MP 443), 7 miles south of Waynesville, NC or 12 miles north of Sylva, NC, on US-23/75, enter onto the Parkway, heading Parkway south, for about 8 miles. Turn right on the access road (MP 451). If you are coming from the south, near Maggie Valley or Cherokee, Waterrock Knob is about 4 miles north of Soco Gap (MP 455). Crabtree Falls Campground Crabtree Falls Campground is located in the highlands of western North Carolina. Hike to Crabtree Falls waterfall from your campsite. Crabtree Falls Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passes can be obtained at all campgrounds. Crabtree Falls A waterfall surrounded by green, forest vegetation Hike to Crabtree Falls while camping in the waterfall's namesake campground Doughton Park Campground This 7,000-acre park is a landscape of open meadows and pioneer cabins, a place to view wildlife and get a feel for the lives of those who lived here long ago. Doughton Park is one of the best places along the motor road to view white-tailed deer, raccoons, red and grey foxes, and bobcats, as well as spectacular shows of flame azalea and rhododendron in the late spring. Doughton Park Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passports can be obtained at all campgrounds. Doughton Park Wildflowers Purple, spiked liatris and yellow coreopsis wildflowers in a meadow on the edge of a forest In summer, wildflowers bloom in the fields around Doughton Park Julian Price Campground Located in North Carolina, the Julian Price Campground offers boating, hiking, fishing and more. The campground is adjacent to Price Lake. Canoe rentals are available at Price Lake, and other types of non-motorized boats are permitted. Fishing is also available at the lake, with a dock provided. Hiking trails accessed from the campground include Price Lake, Boone Fork, Green Knob, and Tanawha trails. Campers may see bears, grouse, turkeys, owls, hawks and more. Julian Price Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passports can be obtained at all campgrounds. Julian Price Campground A vacant campsite, surrounded by rhododendrons, in a forested campground Campsite in Julian Price Campground. Julian Price Campsite A vacant campsite in a forested campground Typical campsite in Julian Price Campground Linville Falls Campground Located in a dense pine canopy, within hiking distance of Linville Gorge and along the famous Blue Ridge Parkway, Linville Falls Campground is an ideal location for your next family camping excursion. Linville Falls Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passports can be obtained at all campgrounds. Linville Falls Campground A tent campsite at the edge of the forest Campsite at Linville Falls Campground Mount Pisgah Mount Pisgah Campground is located in the mountains of western North Carolina at an elevation of 4,980 feet, and offers moderate to cool temperatures during camping seasons. Mount Pisgah is part of the Appalachian Mountain Range, an area of the country with scenery that never disappoints, whether blanketed in wildflowers in the spring or a bursting with orange, yellow and red hues in the fall. Several popular hiking trails, ranging from moderate to difficult, are easily accessible from the campground. Mount Pisgah Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passes can be obtained at all campgrounds. Mount Pisgah Campground A narrow paved road runs through a forested campground Mount Pisgah Campground Mount Pisgah View From Near Campground A forest with early fall colors stretches to distant mountains, with white puffy clouds above Mount Pisgah Area Otter Creek As Otter Creek descends to the James River, the Blue Ridge Parkway dips to its lowest elevation, only 649 feet above sea level. This area's abundant water and warmer temperatures support plant and animal communities that are unlike those found at other areas on the Parkway. A short walk along the Trail of Trees or a hike along the clear, cool waters of Otter Creek will give ample proof that there is more to the Blue Ridge Parkway than mountain-top vistas. Otter Creek Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passports can be obtained at all campgrounds. Otter Creek Campground A view of several vacant campsite in a forested campground Otter Creek Campground Otter Creek Campground in Fall Three RVs parked at campsites in a colorful fall forest Otter Creek Campground in fall Peaks of Otter Campground The campground is nestled at the base of two mountains in the rolling hills of Virginia. Nearby Abbott Lake is well-stocked with small mouth bass and bluegill. A stream winds through the campground, creating a tranquil backdrop for your camping trip. Hikers may choose to climb a mountain or stroll on a flat, lakeside trail. Wildlife such as deer and wild turkey are spotted daily at the Peaks of Otter Campground. Peaks of Otter Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passports can be obtained at all campgrounds. Peaks of Otter Campground Two green pup tents sit in a golden, fall forest Peaks of Otter Campground Rocky Knob Campground Located in the Rocky Knob Recreation area, surrounded by 4,000 acres of forest, the campground is ideal for a traditional camping experience.The site offers easy access to the Rock Castle Gorge Trail--an 10.8-mile loop trail ranging in elevation from 1,700 to 3,572 feet. Rock Castle Gorge, a 1,500-foot ravine carved by the waters of Rock Castle Creek, is the focal point of this trail, offering hikers breathtaking scenery. Rocky Knob Campground Fee 20.00 Per night charge for campsites is posted in each campground and available at www.nps.gov/blri. Holders of the Interagency Senior, Access, Golden Age, or Golden Access passes are entitled to a 50% discount on campground fees. Passports can be obtained at all campgrounds. Rocky Knob Campground An open forest with early fall colors Rocky Knob Campground Rocky Knob Campsite A picnic table marks an empty campsite in a golden, fall forest Rocky Knob Campsite Evening on the Blue Ridge A long pine tree stands in front of distant mountain ridges beneath an orange sunset Evening on the Blue Ridge Parkway Mountain vista Mountain vista and clouds on the Blue Ridge Parkway Beautiful mountain in North Carolina draw visitors from around the world to the Blue Ridge Parkway Sunset from Cowee Mountain Overlook Storm clouds breaking over the mountains at sunset, with fog hugging the valleys Sunset from Cowee Mountain Overlook Linn Cove Viaduct A roadway on piers follows the curve of a mountainside, running toward distant mountains. Linn Cove Viaduct is one of the most iconic features of the Blue Ridge Parkway Black Bear Black Bear sitting on large rocks at the edge of a forest Black bears are among the many mammals found across the Blue Ridge Parkway. Mabry Mill Summer colors at Mabry Mill Located in Virginia's Plateau district, picturesque Mabry Mill is one of the most iconic features of the Blue Ridge Parkway Linville Falls water cascading into Linville Falls plunge basin The Linville Gorge offers visitors the opportunity to learn about fascinating geology and view magnificent waterfalls. 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Celebrate 50 years of the NPS Volunteer-in-Parks Program, and learn about the contributions of the volunteer recipients of the 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service, for work performed in fiscal year 2019. a volunteer wearing a red life vest walks towards you with a smile, lifting a canoe paddle 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Abbie Rowe's Work on the Blue Ridge Parkway NPS photographer, Abbie Rowe, captured images of visitors enjoying the Blue Ridge Parkway during the 1940s and early 1950s. A portrait of a man in a suit and tie holding a camera. Access to Historic Scenic Area Along the Blue Ridge Hampered by Maintenance Needs Built in an area that has lured travelers for hundreds of years, the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Peaks of Otter Campground is nestled between the bases of three mountains in the rolling hills of southwest Virginia. The campground is one of many projects in the NPS maintenance backlog and an example of “deferred maintenance,” which refers to maintenance and repairs of assets that were not performed when they should have been due to budget constraints and are delayed. A view from a mountaintop of a valley with a lake and several buildings. Bat Projects in Parks: Blue Ridge Parkway Work continues to understand the effects of white nose syndrome in Blue Ridge Parkway. A road leading into the Blue Ridge Parkway Driving Through Time “Driving Through Time” is an innovative website built in collaboration with academic partners that highlights multiple perspectives on the complicated, and often contentious, history of the Blue Ridge Parkway. Painting of a roadway winding through hills. National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. Parkway Land Use Maps: Visualizing the Character of the Blue Ridge Parkway The Mabry Mill on the Blue Ridge Parkway is a reflection of how the cultural history of the area was interpreted and incorporated into the parkway's development. The landscape contains features that illustrate the rural landscape character. A wooden mill structure with a water wheel on the edge of water. Fire Prevention Success--What’s Being Accomplished in the National Parks Saunders Family Saunders Farm was home to an African American family near the Peaks of Otter in Virginia. George and Bettie Saunders, with their nine children, grew and sold crops and raised livestock while living on the 22-acre property from the early to mid-twentieth century. Saunders Farm log cabin Blue Ridge Parkway Web Scavenger Hunt The Blue Ridge Parkway is an AMAZING place! Find out what makes it special by exploring our website with the Blue Ridge Parkway scavenger hunt. A close up of a white-tailed deer sticking it's tongue out Draw A Bear Challenge Draw a bear and share your masterpiece with us! A black bear peering over boulders National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks Unwelcome Guests in Acadia The spread of non-native plants and animals is one of the biggest threats facing natural areas. Non-native species, especially those considered invasive, threaten rich communities of native plants and animals across the United States. In national parks, more than 2.6 million acres of park lands are affected by invasive plant species, and 234 National Park Service areas have invasive animals in need of management. Friends of Acadia volunteer helps remove invasive species. Mabry Mill: Ed and Lizzie Mabry Ed and Lizzie Mabry operated Mabry Mill for many decades. The picturesque mill, with its slowly turning water wheel is one of the Blue Ridge Parkway's most iconic scenes. A sepia toned historic photo of an unpainted, wooden mill building with a large, wooden water wheel I'm a Bark Ranger! I'm Bark Ranger Bandit! I love helping with search and rescues to find people who are lost. Let me tell you about myself and my human. A black and white dog looking at the camera. Apple Orchards at Cone Manor Moses Cone is best known as a wealthy, American industrialist, whose textile mills were the world’s leading producers of high-quality denim fabric in the early 1900s. But Moses Cone was also a farmer. The orchards on his Flat Top Manor estate produced award-winning fruit. Two pink apples flowers bloom on a tree branch Bluffs Coffee Shop and Service Station Cultural Landscape Construction of the Bluffs Coffee Shop and Service Station began in 1937, and all major features were in place by 1949. It is a significant part of the historic development of the Blue Ridge Parkway. Although the picnic site has since been abandoned, the property maintains its original association along the parkway as a place for travelers to eat and refuel. People and cars gather along a paved parking area in front of a low building. Doughton Park Campground Cultural Landscape Doughton Park Campground was one of the first developed areas to be designed and built along Blue Ridge Parkway. A component landscape of the Doughton Park cultural landscape, it contributes to the national significance of the parkway. Most construction took place during the first three periods of the park's development (1936-1955), showing the Rustic style of early development and the transitions in the following decades. It continues to be used as a campground for visitors. Two people, facing each other, stand at the roadside between a trailer and a 1940s-style car. Doughton Park Maintenance Area Cultural Landscape Doughton Park Maintenance Area is a component landscape of the Doughton Park landscape of the Blue Ridge Parkway. One of the first maintenance areas to be planned and built along the route, much of the construction was completed by CCC and WPA labor by the early 1940s. The structures are obscured from the parkway by a ravine and trees that were planted in the early 1940s. A large maintenance shed, smaller cabins, and rows of trucks are arranged across a slope. Bluffs Picnic Area Cultural Landscape Bluffs Picnic Area is a component landscape within Doughton Park, on the Blue Ridge Parkway of North Carolina. As one of the first picnic areas developed along the Parkway, it exhibits characteristics of the rustic style as well as aspects of the utilitarian style that became more common on the parkway during later years of development. The comfort station and trail building stand at a point of prominence on the hillside. Brinegar Cabin Cultural Landscape Brinegar Cabin, located in the Doughton Park developed area of the Blue Ridge Parkway, exemplifies both Blue Ridge Parkway design (1933-1987) and the vernacular architecture of nineteenth-century Appalachia (1875-1899). The homestead was established in the late 1800s. Many of its features were preserved or restored with the construction of the Parkway, when it became a pioneer farm exhibit for early motorists. The restored cabin has two stone chimneys, wooden siding, and a shingled roof. Bluffs Lodge Cultural Landscape The Bluffs Lodge landscape, part of the Doughton Park landscape on the Blue Ridge Parkway, was one of the first developed areas planned for the parkway. The entry road, overlook, and parking lot were built in the late 1930s, and the lodge was added ten years later. The overlook and lodge both exemplify the Rustic style. The lodge itself, however, also incorporates materials used after WWII and later trends in park development. Black and white image of Bluffs Lodge under construction, 1949. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Cultural Landscapes of Blue Ridge Parkway: Doughton Park Blue Ridge Parkway stretches 469 miles from Virginia's Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in western North Carolina. The parkway was planned with recreational and scenic opportunities for early motorists, and many of these original features continue to entice travelers. Two men stand beside a trailer type camper and a large car - historic photo, no date NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina and Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] scenic overlook with flowers and distant mountains Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Top 10 Things to Know Before You Go A concrete milepost marker, labeled '0', on the parkway.
68 E di Blue Ridge Parkway www.blueridgeparkway.org DIRECTORY tio n TH TRAVEL PLANNER The Most Visited Unit Of The National Park Service Roanoke Star and Overlook Roanoke, VA Exit at Milepost 90 - 121 Grandfather Mountain Linville, NC Exit at Milepost 305.1 You’ll find opportunities for recreation, hiking, bicycling, picnicking, camping, wildlife viewing and much more. Biltmore Asheville, NC Exit at Milepost 388.8 Official Publication of the Blue Ridge Parkway Association T he 6 8 t h Ed i t i o n OFFICIAL PUBLICATION BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY ASSOCIATION, INC. P. O. BOX 2136, ASHEVILLE, NC 28802 (828) 670-1924 www.blueridgeparkway.org • info@blueridgeparkway.org COPYRIGHT 2017 NO PORTION OF THIS GUIDE OR ITS MAPS MAY BE REPRINTED WITHOUT PERMISSION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE USA. Some Parkway photographs by: Mike Booher, Vicki Dameron, Jeff Greenberg, Alex Armstrong, and Doug Tate © Blue Ridge Parkway Association Layout/Design: Imagewerks Productions: Flat Rock, NC Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park Follow us for more Blue Ridge Parkway information and resources: www.blueridgeparkway.org www.twitter.com/BRParkwayAssoc www.facebook.com/blueridgeparkwayassociation www.pinterest.com/blueridgepkwy Blue Ridge Parkway Travel Planner App “AMERICA’S FAVORITE DRIVE” AT YOUR FINGERTIPS... 469 miles of scenic places, historic sites, lodging, outdoor recommendations and more delivered directly to your smartphone. FREE DOWNLOAD HERE! 2 Planned and developed in cooperation with the Blue Ridge Parkway National Park Service. This free Directory & Travel Planner is published by the 500+ member Blue Ridge Parkway Association to help you more fully enjoy your Parkway area vacation. Members representing attractions, outdoor recreation, accommodations, restaurants, shops, and a variety of other services essential to the traveler are included in this publication. PROMOTING TOURISM FOR MORE THAN 65 YEARS When you visit their place of business, please let them know you found them in the Blue Ridge Parkway Directory & Travel Planner. This will help us ensure the availability of another Directory & Travel Planner for your next visit to the Parkway area. As an official partner agency of the Blue Ridge Parkway -National Park Service, our association is committed to providing trustworthy visitor information across print, web and mobile platforms in cooperation with an active membership of regional travel partners, local businesses and attractions along the scenic corridor of the Shenandoah National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the tri-state region of Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. Distribution of the Directory & Travel Planner does not imply endorsement by the National Park Service of the businesses or commercial services listed. Travel-related businesses in the region served by the Blue Ridge Parkway, Shenandoah National Park and Great Smoky Mountains National Park are eligible for membership. This includes hotels, motels, resorts, restaurants, chambers of commerce, merchants associations, banks, public utilities, manufacturers, retail and wholesale businesses, and travel attractions of all kinds. To join the Blue Ridge Parkway Association go to www.blueridgeparkway.org/join or email: info@blueridgeparkway.org or call (828) 670-1924 Certificate of Excellence Superintendent’s Message 2016 marked an important milestone for the National Park Service. Parks all over the country, including the Blue Ridge Parkway hosted special events, reached out into their communities in person and through social media and shouted from the roof tops to proclaim the excitement that surrounds a 100th birthday. Throughout the year of celebration, a common theme emerged from the visitors to and the communities surrounding the Parkway. PEOPLE LOVE THEIR PARKS. At the Parkway, we talked to thousands of people over the centennial year that shared stories of how parks had changed their lives. Stories of special milestone moments spent in parks, adventures taken and memories that will last a lifetime. These places are truly special, not just for park staff, but for millions of Americans. We also learned, not surprisingly, that people love the communities along the Parkway. With the help of the Blue Ridge Parkway Association we have a tremendous opportunity to not only promote “America’s Favorite Drive”, but also the wealth of diverse communities found along the route. A true Parkway experience is a “drive a little, stop a little” journey with time spent in the towns and cities found here. In many ways our destinies are intertwined. Welcome to In our second century, the National Park Service must recommit to the exemplary stewardship and public enjoyment of these places. We must promote the contributions that national parks and programs make to create jobs, strengthen local economies, and support ecosystem services. We must use the collective power of the parks, our hist

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