"Floating the River" by Shari Quinn , public domain

Bluestone

National Scenic River - West Virginia

The Bluestone National Scenic River protects a 10.5-mile (16.9 km) section of the Bluestone River in Summers and Mercer counties of southern West Virginia. A section of Bluestone NSR is also protected by the West Virginia State Park System within Pipestem Resort State Park. The remaining portion is within a West Virginia Wildlife Management Area.

maps

Official visitor map of New River Gorge National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).New River Gorge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of New River Gorge National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/blue/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluestone_National_Scenic_River The Bluestone National Scenic River protects a 10.5-mile (16.9 km) section of the Bluestone River in Summers and Mercer counties of southern West Virginia. A section of Bluestone NSR is also protected by the West Virginia State Park System within Pipestem Resort State Park. The remaining portion is within a West Virginia Wildlife Management Area. The Bluestone River and the rugged and ancient gorge it has carved is a richly diverse and scenic area of the southern Appalachians. Bluestone National Scenic River is preserved as a living landscape that provides an unspoiled experience for visitors and a haven for a variety of plants and animals. The park protects a 10.5-mile section of the Bluestone River in southern West Virginia. Bluestone National Scenic River is most easily accessed via Bluestone State Park and Pipestem Resort State Park. A narrow, graveled park road provides access to the Bluestone Turnpike Trail at the former Lilly town site at the confluence of the Little Bluestone River. To reach these parks from I-64, take exit 139, then south on Rt. 20. From I-77 take exit 14 to Rt.20 north. Either direction, Bluestone State Park is 15 miles and Pipestem is 22 miles. Sandstone Visitor Center Sandstone Visitor Center is located in New River Gorge National River near Sandstone, WV, and is the primary National Park Service information site for Bluestone National Scenic River. Information can also be obtained at Bluestone State Park and Pipestem State Park, both which border Bluestone National Scenic River. Sandstone Visitor Center is located just north of the I-64 and State Route 20 interchange (Exit 139). GPS coordinates are: 37.78320 N, 80.89778 W The Turnpike Trail Turnpike Trail The ten mile Turnpike Trail parallels the Bluestone, connecting Pipestem Resort State Park and Bluestone State Park. Leading a hike Hiking the Turnpike Trail Ranger Richard leads a guided walk on the Turnpike Trail Enjoying the day Youngster enjoying the Bluestone A young hiker makes his own connection with Bluestone National Scenic River. Bluestone River Bluestone River Bluestone National Scenic River offers a quiet getaway. Bluestone Turnpike Trail Ranger giving information to park visitor NPS Ranger Richard Altaire provides an overview of the park map to a visitor to the Bluestone NSR. National Park Getaway: Bluestone National Scenic River Find quiet solitude and outdoor adventures along one of the most scenic and isolated river gorges in southern West Virginia. Cutting a gorge 1,000 feet deep through the Appalachian Mountains, the lower 10.5 miles of the Bluestone River has created one of the most diverse ecosystems in the southern Appalachians. In 1988 this wild and primitive river gorge was designated as Bluestone National Scenic River. Flat river water surrounded by trees. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Bluestone National Scenic River, West Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] rock outcrop and trees The Future of Our Oak Forests: Can Fire and Fences Sustain Oak Forests for the Future? Oak-dominated forests are an important resource in the Appalachian Mountains, covering vast areas of the dry ridgetops and mesic hillsides. However, the future of these forests is uncertain due to the lack of regeneration that would form the future oak trees. Person crouched beside a forest health monitoring plot, recording data Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Monitoring Program Yields Insights into Forest Health in Bluestone, Gauley River, and New River Gorge Within the New River Gorge National River, Gauley River National Recreation Area, and Bluestone National Scenic River, understanding the current condition of park forests and how the forests are changing is critical to long-term management of park ecosystems. One reason that monitoring forest health is so important—the forests are constantly changing. Storms, pests, pathogens, drought, and new species all play a role in shaping the forest. Forests lining the slopes and ridgetops in New River Gorge 2019 Weather In Review: Bluestone National Scenic River In all, 2019 was very warm and wet with temperatures and precipitation both well above normal. The year ended as the 6th warmest and 35th wettest since 1895. A bend in the Bluestone River as it curves into the distance through some trees. Forest Health in a Regional Context Eight Inventory and Monitoring networks have been collaborating on forest health monitoring since 2005. Participants include 61 national parks in the eastern United States. As a result of this collaboration, vegetation data are collected in similar ways, which allows us to compare various parks across the region. One person on the forest floor collecting data, while another records the data So Many Mushrooms! It started as a personal project. Biological technician Sarah Daugherty would be out collecting data for the Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network’s forest health monitoring program, and notice so many cool mushrooms. She started taking photos and jotting down what she saw. Soon, she noticed that many of the species she was finding weren't on park species lists. Discussing her discoveries with her colleagues, everyone agreed that a more formal fungi inventory was in order. Mushrooms of different colors, shapes, and sizes, laid out next to each other on a floor Silent Witnesses, Old Trees are Hiding in Our Midst An article about old trees in Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network (ERMN) parks. ERMN scientists have collected cores from two "average" looking canopy trees adjacent to every permanent long-term forest health monitoring plot in network parks. Of the 700 trees cored, over 60 of them hovered near 200 years old. A woman uses an increment borer to take a core sample from a tree. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains 2020 Weather In Review: Bluestone National Scenic River In total, the year 2020 was warm and extremely wet at Bluestone National Scenic River. The year ended as the 18th warmest and 3rd wettest on record. Trees silhouetted by a sunset. All Hope is Not Lost – Parks plan strategically to treat invasive plants Managing invasive plant species can seem like an endless and insurmountable challenge, but parks are using a new strategic collaborative tool to protect their most valuable resources. Four photos show invasive plants spreading over an area during 12 years

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