"Birthplace of Booker T. Washington" by NPS Photo , public domain

Booker T. Washington

National Monument - Virginia

The Booker T. Washington National Monument is located near Hardy, Franklin County, Virginia. It preserves portions of the 207-acre (0.90 km²) tobacco farm on which educator and leader Booker T. Washington was born into slavery on April 5, 1856. It provides interpretation of Washington's life and achievements, as well as interpretation of 1850s slavery and farming through the use of buildings, gardens, crafts and animals.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Booker T Washington National Monument (NM) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Booker T Washington - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Booker T Washington National Monument (NM) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Blue Ridge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

3d map of Booker T Washington National Monument (NM) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Booker T Washington - 3d map

3d map of Booker T Washington National Monument (NM) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/bowa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booker_T._Washington_National_Monument The Booker T. Washington National Monument is located near Hardy, Franklin County, Virginia. It preserves portions of the 207-acre (0.90 km²) tobacco farm on which educator and leader Booker T. Washington was born into slavery on April 5, 1856. It provides interpretation of Washington's life and achievements, as well as interpretation of 1850s slavery and farming through the use of buildings, gardens, crafts and animals. Booker T. Washington was born a slave in April 1856 on the 207-acre farm of James Burroughs. After the Civil War, Washington became the first principal of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial School. Later as an adviser, author and orator, his past would influence his philosophies as the most influential African American of his era. Come explore his birthplace. The monument is located on AV 122 (Booker T. Washington Highway), 22 miles southeast of Roanoke, VA. From I-81 take I-581, then U.S. 220 south from Roanoke to VA 122. From the Blule Ridge Parkway take VA 43 south to VA 122. From Lynchburg take U.S. 460 west to VA 122. Booker T. Washington National Monument Visitor Center The visitor center is open daily from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., except for Thanksgiving, December 25, and January 1. Please call the park phone at 540-721-2094 to find out if the park is open or closed during inclement weather. The monument is located on VA 122 (Booker T. Washington Highway), 22 miles southeast of Roanoke, VA. From I-81 take I-581, then US 220 south from Roanoke to VA 122. From the Blue Ridge Parkway take VA 43 south to VA 122. From Lynchburg take US 460 west to VA 122. Tobacco, the cash crop Tobacco field being plowed by man with two draft horses The main crop on the plantation where Booker T. Washington was born was tobacco. This photograph shows a man with draft horses preparing to plow a field. The reconstructed kitchen cabin and smoke house in the snow Back side of kitchen cabin and smokehouse in snow with blue sky and trees The reconstructed kitchen cabin and smoke house on the farm where Booker T. Washington was born. Re-enactors in the reconstructed kitchen cabin at the Old Virginia Christmas Event Four people dressed as enslaved people in front of the fireplace in cabin Re-enactors portraying enslaved people in the reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born and lived for 9 years. Reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Kitchen cabin with child in green dress in front Visit the reconstructed kitchen cabin where Dr. Washington was born Reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Kitchen cabin with trail in front Visit the reconstructed kitchen cabin where Dr. Washington was born Jack-O-Lantern Branch Trail creek Creek on Jack-O-Lantern Branch Trail Take a hike on the Jack-O-Lantern Branch Trail next to the creek School tours at Booker T. Washington National Monument Re-enactor with school children at blacksmith shed looking over fence toward the kitchen cabin Take a tour of the park Horse barn Horse barn Horse barn on farm Reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Foggy morning reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Reconstructed kitchen cabin where Booker T. Washington was born Reconstructed kitchen cabin with herb garden Corn crib on farm corn crib on trail Corn crib on farm Sheep at barn on farm sheep coming out of barn Sheep coming out of barn An Old Virginia Christmas Two re-enactors portraying enslaved people sitting in front of fire inside kitchen cabin Two re-enactors portraying enslaved people sitting in front of fire inside kitchen cabin Visitor center Visitor Center Visitor Center Statue of Dr. Booker T. Washington at Visitor Center Statue of Dr. Booker T. Washington at Visitor Center Statue of Dr. Booker T. Washington at Visitor Center Exhibits on outside of visitor center bathrooms Exhibits on outside of visitor center bathrooms Exhibits on outside of visitor center bathrooms Smokehouse on farm in historic area Smokehouse on farm in historic area Smokehouse on farm in historic area Dinner bell in historic area Dinner bell in historic area Dinner bell in historic area Trail leading to tobacco barn Trail leading to tobacco barn Trail leading to tobacco barn Tobacco barn with wagon Tobacco barn with wagon Tobacco barn with wagon Booker T. Washington Elementary School (Park Headquarters) Booker T. Washington Elementary School (Park Headquarters) Booker T. Washington Elementary School (Park Headquarters) Fence leading down trail from visitor center to historic area Snake/Worm fence leading down trail from visitor center to historic area Fence leading down the trail from the visitor center to the historic area Grapevine arbor Gravevine arbor Grapevine arbor Historic Red Cedar Tree (Juniper) in historic area near Big House outline Historic Red Cedar Tree (Juniper) in historic area near Big House outline Historic Red Cedar Tree (Juniper) in historic area near Big House outline Picnic Area Picnic table in picnic area Picnic Area Picnic Area Handicapped accessible table Picnic Area Handicapped accessible table Picnic Area Handicapped accessible table Outline of Big House where owner's family lived Outline of Big House on ground marking where owner's family lived Outline of Big House where owner's family lived Blacksmith shed Blacksmith shed with kitchen cabin and smokehouse uphill in back ground Blacksmith shed Burroughs' Cemetery Burroughs' Cemetery Burroughs' Cemetery Fence around heirloom garden Fence around heirloom garden with cedar tree in foreground Fence around heirloom garden Park trail and part of pasture Park trail and part of pasture Park trail and part of pasture Horse in barn Horse in barn Horse in barn Horse peeping over fence with other horse in pasture Horse peeping over fence with other horse in pasture Horse peeping over fence with other horse in pasture Sheep in the field Sheep in the field Sheep in the field Gardener in giving garden Gardener in giving garden Gardener in giving garden Juneteenth Re-enactment Juneteenth Re-enactment Juneteenth Re-enactment View of Historic Area from Visitor Center Back Porch View of Historic Area from Visitor Center Back Porch View of Historic Area from Visitor Center Back Porch Harvest Time Festival Wagon Ride Wagon coming up trail to farm with people Harvest Time Festival Wagon Ride Bat Population Monitoring at Booker T. Washington National Monument. Despite its small size of 204 acres, recent research indicates that Booker T. Washington National Monument may support a reproducing population of state endangered little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus). White-nose syndrome has dramatically reduced many bat populations across the region, and to better protect bats and their habitats, the park has been working to learn more about its bat communities. A biologist examining a bat. Women Amidst War The extreme demands of wartime industry and the loss of traditional family breadwinners to military service caused hardship, but also presented opportunities to women for employment, volunteerism, and activism that previously had been unavailable to them. While many of these gains would be temporary, the Civil War nonetheless represents an important step forward in American society's view of the role of women. Women were increasingly seen (and saw themselves) as the foundat Photo of women at a house on the Cedar Mountain battlefield A Time of Reckoning Though the end of the Civil War brought the 13th Amendment, ending slavery and providing emancipation for more than four milllion enslaved people, the Reconstruction era during which Booker T. Washington came of age witnessed legislation that attempted to limit African Americans' new found freedoms. Photo of Booker T. Washington speaking in Louisiana Reconstruction During Reconstruction, the Federal government pursued a program of political, social, and economic restructuring across the South-including an attempt to accord legal equality and political power to former slaves. Reconstruction became a struggle over the meaning of freedom, with former slaves, former slaveholders and Northerners adopting divergent definitions. Faced with increasing opposition by white Southerners and some Northerners, however, the government abandoned effor Picture depictsing former slaves and free blacks voting following the passage of the 15th amendment Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house A Record Crowd of 1300 Attends Juneteenth Event at Booker T. Washington National Monument More than 1,300 people visited Booker T. Washington National Monument on Saturday, June 15, 2019 for the park’s annual celebration of freedom! Families began the day listening to the sounds of gospel music and smelling foods prepared by several vendors including white fish, hot dogs, hamburgers and barbecue. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Booker T Washington National Monument, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. field with cabins National Park Getaway: Booker T. Washington National Monument Booker T. Washington National Monument is the birthplace of noted educator, orator, and presidential adviser, Dr. Booker T. Washington. Washington rose “Up From Slavery” to become one of the most influential African American leaders at the turn of the 20th century. Dr. Washington’s life began as an enslaved person on a farm in these foothills. Log cabin with a stone chimney surrounded by green grass with a blue sky. Geophysical Survey at Booker T. Washington National Monument In 2013, a team of archeologists, cultural resource specialists, park staff, and volunteers conducted a five day geophysical survey at Booker T. Washington National Monument. Using a coordinate grid system, the team used ground penetrating radar, a resistivity meter, and a gradiometer/magnetometer to collect data that will provide insight into the physical layout of the former Burroughs’ Plantation. Survey flags are evenly spaced across the grass surrounding a cabin The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg 2020 Weather In Review: Booker T. Washington National Monument In 2020, Booker T. Washington National Monument experienced the wettest year ever recorded for Franklin County (since 1895). It was also the 7th warmest year on record. A view of farmland on a rainy day. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains An introduction to the benthic macroinvertebrate community at Booker T. Washington National Monument Benthic macroinvertebrates are an important part of stream ecosystems in Booker T. Washington National Monument. NPS scientists are studying these organisms in order to better understand and protect park natural resources. NPS staff examining a net for benthic macroinvertebrates. Breeding bird monitoring at Booker T. Washington National Monument: 2019 status and trends To help inform natural resource management at Booker T. Washington National Monument, National Park Service scientists collect data about breeding bird populations. See what they learned from this data in 2019. Red-headed woodpecker on a branch. 2021 Weather In Review: Booker T. Washington National Monument In 2021, Booker T. Washington National Monument experienced a year that was much drier and warmer than average. Purple sunrise with black silhouetted trees. Resilient Forests Initiative - Managing Invasive Plants & Pests Park forests are threatened by invasive plants and pests. Strategically tackling invasive plants to protect park’s highest priority natural resources and planning around forest pests and pathogens are important actions in managing resilient forests. Forest Regeneration I&M Networks Support Resilient Forest Management NPS Inventory and Monitoring Networks have been tracking forest health in eastern national parks since 2006. This monitoring information can guide resilient forest management and support parks in adapting to changing conditions through the actions described below. Forest health monitoring Ajena Cason Rogers: Amplifying Voices of African American Women While Ajena Rogers has had a variety of roles with the NPS, she became recognized for her expertise as a living history interpreter, portraying the lives of African American women at historic sites. In a 2020 oral history interview with the Park History Program, Rogers speaks of the privilege and burden of this first-person technique, experiencing racial dynamics of both past and present, and the family history that she carries forward. Ajena Rogers in character, in bonnet and apron with a mixing bowl and gazing out a kitchen window. Series: Managing Resilient Forests Initiative for Eastern National Parks Forests in the northeastern U.S. are in peril. Over-abundant deer, invasive plants, and insect pests are impacting park forests, threatening to degrade the scenic vistas and forested landscapes that parks are renowned for. With regional collaboration, parks can manage these impacts and help forests be resilient. This article series explores tools available to park managers to achieve their goals. Healthy forests have many native seedlings and saplings. Geraldine M. Bell When Geraldine Bell first joined the National Park Service (NPS) in 1967 she only planned to stay for three months. She came back in time to play an important role during the celebrations for the bicentennial of the Declaration of Independence. Just three years later she made history as the first Black woman superintendent. Geraldine Bell poses in her NPS uniform, with a badge on her shirt. Managing Resilient Forests. A Regional Initiative Forests cover tens of thousands of acres in eastern national parks and these critical resources face a range of interacting stressors: over-abundant white-tailed deer populations, invasive plant dominance, novel pests and pathogens, among other threats. The Resilient Forests Initiative will help parks address these issue collectively. Forest health monitoring Resilient Forests Initiative - Forest Complexity Much of the forest in the eastern United States is around the same age, regrowing after widespread land clearing that peaked between the 1880's and 1920's. Throughout the twentieth century, forests began to regenerate, eventually spreading onto abandoned agricultural lands. Canopy gap

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming
Yellowstone