by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Bryce Canyon

National Park - Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park, a sprawling reserve in southern Utah, is known for crimson-colored hoodoos, which are spire-shaped rock formations. The park’s main road leads past the expansive Bryce Amphitheater, a hoodoo-filled depression lying below the Rim Trail hiking path. It has overlooks at Sunrise Point, Sunset Point, Inspiration Point and Bryce Point. Prime viewing times are around sunup and sundown.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Bryce Canyon National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Bryce Canyon - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Bryce Canyon National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official Visitor Map of Bryce Canyon National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Bryce Canyon - Detail

Detail of the official Visitor Map of Bryce Canyon National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map for Camping on the east Fork in Dixie National Forest (NF) west of Bryce Canyon National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Dixie - Camping on the East Fork

Map for Camping on the east Fork in Dixie National Forest (NF) west of Bryce Canyon National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Powell Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Dixie MVTM - Powell 2019

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Powell Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter for Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), Arizona Strip BLM Field Office area and Kanab BLM Field Office area in Utah and Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) - Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter

Map of the Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter for Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), Arizona Strip BLM Field Office area and Kanab BLM Field Office area in Utah and Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Powell Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,Dixie MVUM - Powell 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Powell Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

https://www.nps.gov/brca https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryce_Canyon_National_Park Bryce Canyon National Park, a sprawling reserve in southern Utah, is known for crimson-colored hoodoos, which are spire-shaped rock formations. The park’s main road leads past the expansive Bryce Amphitheater, a hoodoo-filled depression lying below the Rim Trail hiking path. It has overlooks at Sunrise Point, Sunset Point, Inspiration Point and Bryce Point. Prime viewing times are around sunup and sundown. Hoodoos (irregular columns of rock) exist on every continent, but here is the largest concentration found anywhere on Earth. Situated along a high plateau at the top of the Grand Staircase, the park's high elevations include numerous life communities, fantastic dark skies, and geological wonders that defy description. From the North: Take I-15 south to UT-20 (exit 95). Travel east on UT-20 to US-89. Follow US-89 south to UT-12. Travel east on UT-12 to UT-63. Take UT-63 south to Bryce Canyon NP. From the South through Zion National Park: Take I-15 north to UT-9 (exit 16). Follow UT-9 east through Zion National Park to US-89. Travel north on US-89 to UT-12. Go east on UT-12 to UT-63. Take UT-63 south to Bryce Canyon NP. From the East Travel west on UT-12 to UT-63. Take UT-63 south to Bryce Canyon NP. Bryce Canyon Visitor Center The Bryce Canyon Visitor Center might be one of your first stops when visiting Bryce Canyon National Park. Here you can obtain driving and hiking directions beyond those available on this website, weather forecasts, a current schedule of Park Ranger guided programs, Junior Ranger booklets, and information on area services including lodging, dining and other attractions. The Visitor Center is located approximately one mile south from the park entrance on UT-63. From the North: Take I-15 south to UT-20 (exit 95). Travel east on UT-20 to US-89. Follow US-89 south to UT-12. Travel east on UT-12 to UT-63. Take UT-63 south to Bryce Canyon National Park. From the South through Zion National Park: Take I-15 north to UT-9 (exit 16). Follow UT-9 east through Zion National Park to US-89. Travel north on US-89 to UT-12. Go east on UT-12 to UT-63. Take UT-63 south to the park. North Campground Located across the road from the Visitor Center and is comprised of 100 sites in 4 loops; A, B, C, D. Loops A & B are for RV campers. Loops C & D are for tent campers (tents are permitted in all loops). There are no sewer, water or electrical hook-ups available. A dump station is available in summer months near North Campground; use is included with campsite fee. Potable water is available near the dump station. North Campground is close to the Visitor Center, General Store, and Fairyland Loop/Rim Trail. Per Tent Site 20.00 Cost is per night. All sites are limited to 10 people with no more than 6 adults (16 and up); 3 tents; and 2 cars, or 4 motorcycles. Holders of the following passes (with valid ID) receive a 50% discount on their camping fees: Golden Age & Golden Access Passes; America the Beautiful Federal Lands Senior Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents 62 years and older); America the Beautiful Federal Lands Access Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents with a permanent disability). Per RV Site 30.00 Cost is per night. All sites are limited to 10 people with no more than 6 adults (16 and up); 3 tents; 2 cars, or 4 motorcycles, or 1 RV/trailer with 1 tow vehicle. Holders of the following passes (with valid ID) receive a 50% discount on their camping fees: Golden Age & Golden Access Passes; America the Beautiful Federal Lands Senior Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents 62 years and older); America the Beautiful Federal Lands Access Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents with a permanent disability). North Campground Campsite Camping chairs, a tent, and camper at a campsite. Both tents and RVs are welcome in North Campground Sunset Campground Located west of Sunset Point, approximately 1.5 miles south of the Bryce Canyon Visitor Center, and is comprised of 99 sites in 3 loops; Loop A is primarily for RVs; Loops B & C are tent-only. There are no sewer, water or electrical hook-ups available. A dump station is available in summer months near North Campground; use is included with campsite fee. Potable water is available near the dump station. Sunset Campground is close to Sunset Point and has a shuttle stop at its entrance. Tent Site 20.00 Cost is per night. All sites are limited to 10 people with no more than 6 adults (16 and up); 3 tents; and 2 cars, or 4 motorcycles. Holders of the following passes (with valid ID) receive a 50% discount on their camping fees: Golden Age & Golden Access Passes; America the Beautiful Federal Lands Senior Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents 62 years and older); America the Beautiful Federal Lands Access Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents with a permanent disability). RV Site 30.00 Cost is per night. All sites are limited to 10 people with no more than 6 adults (16 and up); 3 tents; 2 cars, or 4 motorcycles, or 1 RV/trailer with 1 tow vehicle. Holders of the following passes (with valid ID) receive a 50% discount on their camping fees: Golden Age & Golden Access Passes; America the Beautiful Federal Lands Senior Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents 62 years and older); America the Beautiful Federal Lands Access Pass (lifetime pass for U.S. residents with a permanent disability). RV site in Sunset Campground Two RVs parked at gravel campsites in Sunset Campground. Both RVs and Tent campers are welcome in Sunset Campground Bryce Amphitheater from Inspiration Point A red rock landscape and plateau forest glows with the morning sun Viewpoints of the iconic Bryce Amphitheater are located along the first 3 miles of the park road and are a popular destination at sunrise. Winter sunrise at Sunset Point Snow blankets a red rock landscape of tall rock spires beneath an early morning sky Here at 8,000' (2438 m) winter comes early and stays late. Snow transforms the landscape and requires seasonal closures in some areas and trails. Milky Way over the Hoodoos The center of the Milky Way galaxy is seen rising above a horizon of forest and red rock spires Bryce Canyon's clean air and dark night skies are some of its most precious and vulnerable resources. Full moon nights also provide a unique experience of seeing the park after dark. Queen's Garden Trail A lone white rock tower stands surrounded by red rock walls and forest along a trail More strenuous trails below the rim provide up-close views of the hoodoo rock spires, while easier walks along the rim give perspective from above. Bristlecone Loop trail near Yovimpa Point Red and white rock cliffs lightly dusted with snow with a forest atop them and a long view beyond The park's highest elevations at its southern end and backcountry areas provide views of over 100 miles (161 km) atop high steep cliffs. Old NPS Housing Historic District Cultural Landscape Old National Park Service (NPS) Housing Historic District is located in the heart of a visitor-focused area of Bryce Canyon National Park. The existing landscape and its Rustic style buildings reflect a period of development within the National Park Service, characterized by park planning principles that had been formalized by the National Park Service between the years of 1916-1942. Ranger station/residence, 1929 (Old NPS Housing Historic District: CLI, NPS, 2010) 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. Bryce Canyon Lodge/Deluxe Cabins Cultural Landscape The Bryce Canyon Lodge/Deluxe Cabins cultural landscape is a significant example of the role of landscape architecture in Rustic style of national park design and planning. A rustic lodge with a broad green roof is surrounded by a low stone wall and tall pine trees. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] park scene colorful rock hoodoos Park Sells Firewood from Thinning Project In the last two years, Bryce Canyon National Park has completed numerous fuels reduction projects to reduce the stand density of ponderosa pine and return the forest to a more natural state, while also reducing the risk to park infrastructure. Firewood being collected by local residents Bryce Canyon National Park Completes Fuels Reduction Project Bryce Canyon NP completed a major fuels reduction project around Bryce Canyon Lodge to reduce the fuel loading and return the forest to a more natural state. Ponderosa pine was thinned and limbed by chainsaw to eliminate the risks that a prescribed fire might have. The debris was burned in piles in winter, when there was less risk of escape. Some wood was sold as firewood. This work restored resilient landscapes and fire-adapted human communities. Landbird Monitoring in Northern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 2018 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2018. Small, bright-orange bird with yellowish underfeathers. Structure Assessments Conducted at Bryce Canyon National Park Wildland Fire Modules from Saguaro NP, Bandelier NM, and Zion NP participated in the annual Wildland Fire Module Conference in May 2012 at Bryce Canyon National Park. The modules coordinated on performing structure assessments. The information they collected will be available on an internal agency mapping website called “InsideMaps,” so fire personnel can look up hazard assessment information when responding to a fire in the area. Veteran Story: William Bouley Bill Bouley served in the US Army for 20 years. Today he continues in public service as a Safety Manager for several parks and monuments in southern Utah. Bill Bouley, in uniform, with a helicopter in the background Survival of the Southern Paiute The Paiutes have overcome insurmountable challenges and devastation as a people. Their long struggle to preserve the Paiute way and flourish continues. But they will not give up. Instead, they celebrate their achievements, promising that while “[t]he struggle is long and difficult… the Paiute will survive.” Native American man in ceremonial dress with orange cliffs in the background. California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. Rainbow Point Fuels Reduction Project at Bryce Canyon National Park This "Success Story" video highlights the Rainbow Point Fuels Reduction Project at Bryce Canyon National Park and the successful utilization of that treatment to stop the Riggs/Lonely Fires in 2018. Park Air Profiles - Bryce Canyon National Park Air quality profile for Bryce Canyon National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Bryce Canyon NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Bryce Canyon NP. Thor’s Hammer at sunrise The Sounds of Spring When the weather warms, national parks across the country rouse from winter’s sleep. The sounds you hear in parks reflect this seasonal change. They contribute to the unique soundscape of these special places, and are among the resources that the National Park Service protects. Sandhill cranes dance in a courtship ritual in flooded grasslands at Great Sand Dunes NP. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Northern Colorado Plateau Park Waters Pesticides, antibiotics, and personal care products are all being found in streams and rivers. But would you expect to find them in a national park? On the northern Colorado Plateau, scientists found that even in isolated areas, these "contaminants of emerging concern" are not uncommon. Find out what we found where--and how you can help. Ripples in cave water Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. 2020 WORLDFEST FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS In 2020 Harpers Ferry Center (HFC) won eight awards at WorldFest Houston. Many of these can be viewed over the summer through our upcoming film festival in celebration of HFC’s 50th Anniversary. (Note: The Special Jury REMI Award is given for a ranking of A+ and recognizes the top films in each category.) Green trees grow in red dirt canyons unde a cloudy sky. Hummingbird Monitoring in Southwestern National Parks Hummingbirds are beautiful and charismatic, but not as well studied as many other birds. Some hummingbird species in the U.S. might be in decline, so monitoring them to estimate their abundance and detect trends in their populations is an important step towards developing a conservation strategy. Releasing a hummingbird after banding. What We’re Learning and Why it Matters: Long-Term Monitoring on the Northern Colorado Plateau Knowing which key natural resources are found in the national parks, and whether they're stable or changing, helps decisionmakers make sound choices. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network is building that knowledge. After more than ten years of monitoring, we've learned a lot about park ecosystems, how they're changing, and what they may look like in the days to come. Find out what we’ve learned and how it’s being used to help managers plan for the future. Man stands in a stream, looking down at a handheld gauge. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2019 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2019. Bald eagle Water Quality in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network: Water Years 2016–2018 Once a month, ecologists collect water samples at dozens of monitoring sites in and near ten National Park Service units across Utah and Colorado. This consistent, long-term monitoring helps alert managers to existing and potential problems. Find out the results for 2016-2018 in this brief from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network. A monitoring crew of three samples a clear river flowing over brown rock and sand Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Ponderosa Canyon Viewpoint Repair For years, a few of the columns at Ponderosa Canyon have been tilting towards the canyon creating an unsafe area for visitors. Most parks have amazing maintenance crews that easily deal with day to day issues, but not all have crews that perform construction work that is typically contracted out to repair issues like this. A little over a year ago, Floyd Winder, formerly working at Zion National Park, arrived at Bryce and hit the ground running. A brown wooden sign labeled Ponderosa Point Elevation 8904 with stone barriers connected by logs Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2020 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2020. Small beige bird with black beak and feet, brown back. Monitoring From Space: Using Satellite Imagery to Measure Landscape Conditions on the Ground Scientists from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network travel thousands of miles each year to collect data on plants, soils, and water across network parks. But it would be impossible to cover every square inch of the Northern Colorado Plateau with boots on the ground. Instead, we simultaneously monitor the parks with boots in space—satellite data that provide information at a much broader scale. Satellite and Earth in space Localized Drought Impacts on Northern Colorado Plateau Landbirds Birds of the desert southwest, a climate-change hotspot, are among the most vulnerable groups in the US. To help park managers plan for those changes, scientists evaluated the influence of water deficit on landbird communities at 11 national parks in Utah and Colorado. The results will help land managers to focus conservation efforts on places where certain species are most vulnerable to projected climate changes. A man wearing a clipboard looks through binoculars at dawn in field of sagebrush Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background The Road to Rainbow: Snow Removal at Bryce Canyon National Park Every winter, Bryce Canyon's Roads and Trails crew is responsible for keeping the park accessible no matter the weather. From plowing the park's most popular viewpoints in the Bryce Amphitheater, to making sure staff can get to work, to finally clearing the Southern Scenic Drive to Rainbow Point, we invite you to ride along for a behind-the-scenes look. A small tractor uses a snow blower to remove snow from a parking lot. Water Resources on the Colorado Plateau Describes the origin, uses, threats to, and conservation of water on the Colorado Plateau. Dark green body of water winding through red rock formations with brilliant sun overhead. Pauline Mead Pauline "Polly" Mead fell in love with the Grand Canyon as a botany student. Her knowledge of the plants at the canyon, together with a connection to National Park Service (NPS) Director Stephen T. Mather, got her a job as the first woman ranger-naturalist at Grand Canyon National Park in 1930. Mead's formal NPS career was short because she married the park's assistant superintendent in 1931. As a "park wife" she continued to live and research in parks for another 25 years. Polly Mead in her NPS uniform examining a plant.

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming