"Coastal view, Cabrillo National Monument, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Cabrillo

National Monument - California

Cabrillo National Monument is at the southern tip of the Point Loma Peninsula in San Diego, California. It commemorates the landing of Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo at San Diego Bay on September 28, 1542. This event marked the first time a European expedition had set foot on what later became the West Coast of the United States.

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maps

Area map of Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cabrillo - Area Map

Area map of Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cabrillo - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Vintage 1950 USGS 1:250000 map of San Diego in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - San Diego - 1950

Vintage 1950 USGS 1:250000 map of San Diego in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

brochures

Spring/Summer Visitor Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cabrillo - Guide Spring/Summer 2016

Spring/Summer Visitor Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Life in the Intertidal Zone at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Site Bulletins - Life in the Intertidal Zone

Brochure about Life in the Intertidal Zone at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Reptiles and Amphibians at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Site Bulletins - Reptiles

Brochure about Reptiles and Amphibians at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Checklist for Birds at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Site Bulletins - Birds

Checklist for Birds at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Shorebirds at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Site Bulletins - Shorebirds

Brochure about Shorebirds at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Spring Wildflowers at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Site Bulletins - Spring Wildflowers

Brochure about Spring Wildflowers at Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Intertidal Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Field Guides - Intertidal Guide

Intertidal Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Native Bird Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Field Guides - Native Bird Field Guide

Native Bird Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Native Plant Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Field Guides - Native Plant Field Guide

Native Plant Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Native Herptiles Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cabrillo - Native Herptiles Field Guide

Native Herptiles Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Terrestrial Mammals Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cabrillo - Terrestrial Mammals Field Guide

Terrestrial Mammals Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Geology Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cabrillo - Geology Field Guide

Geology Field Guide for Cabrillo National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/cabr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabrillo_National_Monument Cabrillo National Monument is at the southern tip of the Point Loma Peninsula in San Diego, California. It commemorates the landing of Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo at San Diego Bay on September 28, 1542. This event marked the first time a European expedition had set foot on what later became the West Coast of the United States. Climbing out of his boat and onto shore in 1542, Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo stepped into history as the first European to set foot on what is now the West Coast of the United States. In addition to telling the story of 16th century exploration, the park is home to a wealth of cultural and natural resources. Join us and embark on your own Voyage of Exploration. FROM DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO Take Harbor Drive past the airport Turn left onto Rosecrans Street Turn right onto Canon Street Turn left onto Catalina Blvd. (also known as Cabrillo Memorial Drive) Follow Catalina Blvd. all the way to the end Visitor Center and View Building The Visitor Center at Cabrillo National Monument is the perfect place to get oriented to the park. Rangers and volunteers are always available to answer questions and provide suggestions on what to do. Here you can: • Find the day’s schedule of auditorium programs and ranger talks • Get your National Parks Passport book stamped • Chat with a ranger • Pick up a Junior Ranger activity for kids • Find out when low tide is • Visit the park store • Many other things! FROM DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO Take Harbor Drive past the airport Turn left onto Rosecrans Street Turn right onto Canon Street Turn left onto Catalina Blvd. (also known as Cabrillo Memorial Drive) Follow Catalina Blvd. all the way to the end Rocky Intertidal Zone Tidepools at Cabrillo Low Tide at the Tidepools Sunset at Cabrillo Sun setting over the Pacific Sunset at Cabrillo Dusk at the Old Point Loma Lighthouse Dusk at the Old Point Loma Lighthouse Dusk over the Old Point Loma Lighthouse Old Point Loma Lighthouse Spring flowers in front of Old Point Loma Lighthouse Spring flowers in front of Old Point Loma Lighthouse View from Cabrillo Looking out on San Diego from Cabrillo View looking over to Coronado from Cabrillo Pelican Point View of Pelican Point at Cabrillo Pelican Point at Cabrillo National Monument 2013 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service More than 200,000 volunteers provide invaluable time and energy to the National Park Service. Meet the people and groups being honored with a 2013 Hartzog Award. Group of cleanup volunteers with full trash bags NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Cabrillo National Monument, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] waves breaking on coastal bluffs Cabrillo Peregrine Pair Raises Four Chicks Starting each February, Cabrillo National Monument volunteers and natural resources staff eagerly await low or minus tides, but not for the excellent tidepooling as you might expect. Rather, it is the opportunity to hike out on otherwise submerged rocks for a view of the cliffs above. There, they can record sightings of a pair of the world’s fastest animals, peregrine falcons, which have nested on the cliff since 2014. One juvenile peregrine falcon preparing to land near one of its siblings at the top of a cliff Investigating Ocean Acidification in the Rocky Intertidal <em>July 21, 2016</em> - Cabrillo National Monument and Channel Islands National Park are concerned about the impact that ocean acidification will have on their intertidal communities and the ability of their visitors to enjoy a seascape rich in marine life. They already monitor key rocky intertidal species, but to understand the dynamics of ocean acidification in the rocky intertidal and how the monitored species are responding, a new type of monitoring has become necessary. A freshly collected interidal seawater sample. Recording Echolocation Calls to Learn About Bats in Cabrillo National Monument <em>March 15, 2017</em> - Cabrillo National Monument boasts a surprisingly high number of bat species for its small size. National Park Service and San Diego Natural History Museum biologists recently teamed up to monitor and inventory the area’s bat populations. By recording bat echolocation calls, biologists identified ten species, including a new species for the area. They also discovered a distinct seasonal peak in the number of bat calls. Segment of a bat call sonogram Shaw’s Agave – A Species on the Edge <em>March 15, 2017</em> - Shaw’s agave is a species of concern that is literally and figuratively on the edge along the Southern California coast. One of its northernmost populations occurs in the rare coastal sage scrub community near the boundaries of Cabrillo National Monument. Recruitment of new individuals to in the local population has declined to zero. Cabrillo and San Diego Natural History Museum biologists are now trying to find out why. Researcher hand pollinating a Shaw's agave flower The Guns of San Diego at Cabrillo National Monument Constructed during World War II, this concrete and steel fire control station was most important in Harbor Defenses of San Diego in that the battery commander of 16-inch-gun Battery Ashburn operated from the top level (BC3) directing the fire of his guns. The lower level (B1/3 S1/3) served as one of five base end stations for Ashburn. 16 inch gun emplacement at Cabrillo National Monument Other Colors at Cabrillo National Monument Winter rains have brought color to Cabrillo National Monument in more ways than one. Most of all, monument staff have been noticing bright spots of orange and red moving among the amazing display of flowers. Some of the spots are covered in black and white fuzz and organized in a long series of rows. Other dark orange spots appear at either end of a smooth, black, orange-lined body. Upon closer inspection, these bursts of color belong to two different kinds of caterpillars. Close-up of the orange head of a white-lined sphinx moth caterpillar A New Species for Cabrillo National Monument Each month on a Monday, a team of Cabrillo National Monument biologists and volunteers head out to the field to begin a week of pitfall trapping. Most often, they find common lizards and a lot of small mammals. Sometimes, a bucket will contain a snake or a salamander. This season, diversity has been particularly high. The team also found a species that had never been recorded in more than 20 years of pitfall trapping. Botta's pocket gopher peeking out of a plastic cup This Shrub is Not Getting Enough Fire. Humans and Hot Water are Helping. The wart-stem ceanothus is an evergreen shrub native only to San Diego County and Northern Baja California. As a species that requires fire to germinate, it is also threatened in San Diego County by fire suppression, as well as by urbanization. As a result, Cabrillo National Monument is taking steps to help. A view of the flower clusters on the branches of the wart-stem ceanothus. City Nature Challenge at Cabrillo National Monument – A Celebration of Science for the Entire Community With the growing popularity of citizen science National Park Service scientists are employing the power of the people to help them solve the problems they face. Read on to learn about one such project that just concluded at Cabrillo National Monument. A mother uses iNaturalist to take a photo of a tidepool organism as her two children explore Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. What the Beeps Tell Us: Tracking Rattlesnakes at Cabrillo National Monument A Masters student in the Department of Biology at San Diego State University, Roman Nava works in the lab of Population Ecologist Dr. Rulon Clark. One of the main goals of this lab group is to understand how animal populations are connected and restructured as an effect of human habitat fragmentation. In Roman’s case he focuses on one of Cabrillo National Monument’ s top predators – the Southern Pacific rattlesnake. Researcher on a hillside holding a metal antenna Microplastics on National Park Beaches Every beachgoer has probably noticed plastic trash littering their favorite beaches, however remote. A new study of microplastic distribution on national park beaches indicates that whichever one you visit, there is probably also some amount of plastic that is harder to see, mixed in with the sand between your toes. Microplastic piece and organic matter Field Season Beginning for Mediterranean Coast Plant Monitoring Teams <em>March 15, 2017</em> - Even for drought tolerant southern California plant communities, four dry years in a row was a lot to handle. Annual vegetation monitoring at each of the three parks in the Mediterranean Coast Inventory and Monitoring Network recorded significant dieback in some places. This year, however, rainfall has been well above average throughout the region. Monitoring teams are excited to survey in a much more brightly colored landscape. Shooting stars decorated in water droplets Local Students Join Restoration Efforts at Cabrillo National Monument In an effort to preserve and protect vulnerable park resources, Cabrillo National Monument partnered with students from High Tech High Media Arts (HTHMA) in a large-scale native plant propagation and restoration effort. Night Sky Darkness in Coastal Southern California National Parks The velvet black of a dark night sky offers many values. People seek darkness for stargazing. Birds navigate by starlight. Prey hides from predator in the dark. But light pollution from human development—streetlights, buildings and other sources of artificial light—is spilling over into natural areas and taking an ecological toll. In Southern California, the National Park Service monitors the night sky of its parks and applies best practices to improve night sky darkness. Portion of the Milky Way visible over mountaintops in the Santa Monica Mountains. Cabrillo Hosts Cutting-Edge Genetics Research The rare Shaw's agave grows only in coastal southern California and northern Mexico. It has declined because of human activities and natural erosion. Managing this species—including a population in the park that was established in the 1970s with transplants from unknown sources—depends on knowing how genetically variable are the plants and soil microbes that provide nutrients, and how populations are related to each other. Rubber-gloved fingers drop a small, freshly clipped piece of agave into a plastic vial. Shaw's Agave: A Cross-border Botanical Gem Shaw’s agave is a rare and unique succulent plant endemic to a narrow, 200 mile, stretch along the southwestern California and northern Baja California coastline. South of the border, it is commonly found along the undeveloped portions of the western coast of Baja California. North of the border, however, the species has been reduced to just two small and isolated populations, one of which consists of a single genetic individual. Large Shaw's agave plants, in black and white. Cabrillo Intertidal Bioblitz 2016: The Maiden Voyage On March 6th, 2016, Cabrillo National Monument was proud to successfully host one of the first National Park Bioblitz events of the year in our rocky intertidal zone. This BioBlitz is part of a larger effort coordinated by the National Park Service (NPS) to celebrate the NPS Centennial. This event and others like it are great opportunities to learn more about the biodiversity of a park and contribute to our greater understanding of the biodiversity of the nation. Pollinators - Hummingbirds Hummingbirds (family Trochilidae) are amazingly adapted pollinators, and they play an important role in pollination. A flying hummingbird hovers next to a red flower 2016 Urban Island Bioblitz Results On May 21-22, 2016, Cabrillo National Monument and several other park units hosted a Centennial Bioblitz event. Utilizing the biodiversity observation application, iNaturalist, explorers of all ages made their way to Cabrillo to discover biodiversity in their National Park. Thanks to an incredible team of over 157 scientists, exhibitors, and volunteers, over 1706 observations spanning 427 species were documented throughout the 24-hour Bioblitz period landing us in 3rd place. MiniBlitz- Connecting Students to Science In preparation for the 2016 National Parks Centennial Bioblitzes occurring around the country this week (May 16-22nd, 2016), the science education staff at Cabrillo National Monument hosted a “MiniBlitz” in our local community. Staff members were excited to collaborate with four – 4th and 5th grade classrooms at the local elementary schools, High Tech Elementary and Explorer Elementary. iNaturalist: Become a Citizen Scientist at Cabrillo At Cabrillo National Monument, we created a “how-to” instructional video to guide students and visitors in creating and using their iNaturalist account. Available in both English and Spanish, these videos will help support explorers in creating observations and taking notes about local flora and fauna. National Parks Defend America's Coast During World War II Many national park sites joined the war effort in World War II by erecting Aircraft Warning, radio and radar stations. Some historic forts came to life with coastal defenses ready to defend the nation. color photo of explosion atop a fort wall, ocean beyond Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal The Giant Owl Limpet: Keystone of the Intertidal A "keystone species" is defined as one so critical to an ecosystem that without it, the system would change dramatically. These are the species that hold a biome together. Their presence or absence has a disproportionate impact on the other organisms within the system and on the system at large. It is always tempting to imagine these incredibly important organisms as proportional in size to their huge role in the ecosystem; however, that is not always the case. Two large marine snails on a boulder as the sun sets on the tidepools beyond. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Cabrillo National Monument Visitor Center Historic District Cultural Landscape The Cabrillo National Monument Visitor Center Historic District, constructed in 1963-1967, offers commanding views of the San Diego coast as well as interpretive exhibits and programs. NPS A paved trail leading to a building on a hill. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Plan Like a Park Ranger - Top 10 Tips for Visiting Cabrillo National Monument Plan Like a Park Ranger at Cabrillo National Monument, the only National Park in San Diego, California. A white lighthouse on a bluff with a pine tree on the left and blue sky. West Coast National Parks Work with NOAA to Better Understand Ocean Acidification in the Rocky Intertidal and Beyond Ocean acidification (OA) is a huge threat to marine life. But it is hard to track remotely on a large scale. So this summer, seven West Coast national parks are teaming up with the 2021 NOAA West Coast Ocean Acidification Cruise. They’ll collect water samples in-person to check several OA indicators. Their data will help paint the most detailed picture yet of OA conditions up and down the coast, from parks’ rocky intertidal zones to dozens of miles offshore. Collage of different rocky intertidal creatures photographed against a white background. Latino Conservation Week at Cabrillo National Monument A person’s cultural background and identity shapes the lens with which they view the world. This is particularly apparent at Cabrillo National Monument, as the history of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo illustrates the complexities of identity through history. Originally thought to be Portuguese, recent historical research has revealed that he said he was from Spain. An Ocean on the Edge Along the northwestern tip of the continental United States, large rocky stacks rise like sentinels from the mist. Shrouded in beauty and wonder, the expansive coastline of Olympic National Park sets a dramatic stage for the convergence of several unique ecosystems. Pristine, glacier-capped mountains painted in lush rainforests descend swiftly into the crashing waves where land meets sea. This is where our story begins. Black-and-white photo of impressive rocky stacks rising up above an expansive coastline. 2020 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Each year nearly 300,000 volunteers across the National Park Service (NPS) donate more than 6.5 million hours of service, for a value of more than $185 million. Through their extraordinary work and dedication, these volunteers make an exceptional contribution to their parks and communities. We are pleased to congratulate the national recipients of the 2020 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. Photo of Tom and Karen Hartley dressed in period clothing standing and smiling outdoors. POET Newsletter September 2014 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from September 2014. Articles include: Sea Star Wasting Disease; Corallivore: Crown of Thorns Starfish Wreak Havoc in American Samoa — The NPS Responds; Seafloor in 3D; and Coral Bleaching Monitoring on Guam. A large, red-colored sunflower sea star that appears to be melting or disintegrating. Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline. POET Newsletter February 2014 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from February 2014. Articles include: A Beacon of Light for the Channel Islands; A Challenging Place; Isolation within Isolation; Destruction Island Lighthouse A black and white historic photo of the Destruction Island lighthouse tower on a bluff top. Event Recap - Stories of Service: Empowering Youth and Young Adults to Be the Future Face of Volunteering in National Parks The National Park Service Youth Programs Division co-hosted a virtual event, “Stories of Service: Empowering Youth and Young Adults to Be the Future Face of Volunteering in National Parks” on November 10, 2021 with the National Park Service Volunteers-In-Parks Program (VIP) in partnership with the National Park Foundation (NPF). A diverse panel shared their stories of volunteering in parks and the impacts these experiences have had on them. Screenshot of speakers and panelists from Nov. 10 Volunteers Event Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Dr. Linh Anh Cat Meet Dr. Linh Anh Cat, the Chief of Resources Management and Science at Cabrillo. She had no examples of what path she should take, but she always trusted her instincts on what was right and now works on increasing our understanding of fog in the context of climate change. This article is part of Dare to Imagine, a National Park Foundation grant-funded project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. a graphic of woman on rocky coast. Text Reads Dr. Linh Anh Cat Chief of Resources Management Dare to Imagine: Samantha Wynns Read about Samantha's STEM summer program for underrepresented girls and how taking one day, one application, one new job at a time helped her overcome her fears. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. blue graphic with young woman's photo. text reads: Samantha Wynns Conservation Biologist Maria Arcadia Israel María Arcadia Alipás Israel’s experiences embody the nature of the work at the old Point Loma Lighthouse during the initial decades of California statehood. She lived and worked in the lighthouse for 18 years, for a time as assistant lighthouse keeper, and her presence is still evident at the site today through displays of her craftwork. Round shell artwork with flowers wrapped around a view of buildings and a grassy field The EcoLogik Project The world is changing at a prodigious rate. Climate change is accelerating and ecosystems across the globe are on the brink of collapse. In order to solve these significant global issues, we need everyone’s efforts—every voice at the table. Unfortunately, not everyone is welcome or feels welcome at the table—there is a disconnect of women and female identifying representation in science fields. Out of this disconnect, the EcoLogik Project was created. Young female student participant engages with a snake ambassador. The Great Bee Quest In September 2020, Cabrillo National Monument—San Diego’s only national park—participated in the 2020 Parks for Pollinators BioBlitz organized by the National Recreation and Park Association. It was during this month-long, concentrated, species documentation effort that park naturalist Patricia Simpson made the original discovery of a red-and-black bee with which she was unfamiliar. This observation spurred a community-wide effort to locate and identify the elusive red bee. The sun shines over a rocky ridge with bunches of bright yellow flowers in the foreground.

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