"South Core Banks, looking up island -- before and after Hurricane Florence" by NPS Photo/Francesca Peay , public domain

Cape Lookout

National Seashore - North Carolina

Cape Lookout National Seashore preserves a 56-mile (90-km) long section of the Southern Outer Banks, or Crystal Coast, of North Carolina, USA, running from Ocracoke Inlet on the northeast to Beaufort Inlet on the southeast. Three undeveloped barrier islands make up the seashore - North and South Core Banks and Shackleford Banks. The seashore includes two historic villages on Core Banks, Shackleford's wild horses, and the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, which has a black-and-white diamond pattern. A visitors center for the seashore is located on Harkers Island.

maps

Official visitor map of Cape Lookout National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cape Lookout - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cape Lookout National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/calo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Lookout_National_Seashore Cape Lookout National Seashore preserves a 56-mile (90-km) long section of the Southern Outer Banks, or Crystal Coast, of North Carolina, USA, running from Ocracoke Inlet on the northeast to Beaufort Inlet on the southeast. Three undeveloped barrier islands make up the seashore - North and South Core Banks and Shackleford Banks. The seashore includes two historic villages on Core Banks, Shackleford's wild horses, and the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, which has a black-and-white diamond pattern. A visitors center for the seashore is located on Harkers Island. A boat ride three miles off-shore brings you to the barrier islands of Cape Lookout National Seashore. Horse watching, shelling, fishing, birding, camping, lighthouse climbing, and touring historic villages--there’s something for everyone at Cape Lookout. Be sure to bring all the food, water, and supplies you need (and carry your trash out of the park) when visiting these remote beaches. Only two areas of Cape Lookout National Seashore can be reached without taking a ferry: the Visitor Center on Harkers Island and the Visitor Information Center in Beaufort, NC. Please note: the park mailing address does not bring you to the Harkers Island Visitor Center parking lot. If you are using a GPS device - use the parking lot coordinates (34.68494, -74.52725) or the following "address" which approximates the location of the parking lot entrance: 1800 Island Rd, Harkers Island, NC 28531 Beaufort Visitor Information Center Available Facilities: Information, maps, restrooms & first aid, Programs and Amenities: Exhibits on island ecology and history, park map, park passport stamp. Free Jr Ranger and Jr Ranger Adventures activity guides. This visitor information center is located at 701 Front Street in Beaufort, NC, approximately 4.5 mi (7 km) east of Morehead City and 40 mi (60 km) south of the Cedar Island terminus of the North Carolina State Ferry route from Ocracoke Island to Cedar Island. This visitor center is one of two Ferry Gateways to the Cape Lookout Light Station and Shackleford Banks. Great Island Cabin Office Located at Great Island on South Core Banks, this area is only reached by either the park ferry or your personal boat. The vehicle ferry coming from Davis, NC lands here, dropping off 4-wheel drive vehicles and passengers. The Office is open seasonally from 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM daily. Available facilities: First Aid, park passport stamp, free Jr Ranger booklet, beach wheelchair (free rental), recreation permits The Great Island Cabin Camp can be reached by ferries leaving from the town of Davis, NC. These ferries can carry both passengers and four-wheel drive vehicles. Harkers Island Visitor Center Available Facilities: Restrooms, first aid, ferry ticket booth, picnic area, and a kayak launch site. Programs and Amenities: Exhibits on island history and ecology including the Shackleford Banks horses; interactive map of the park; Discovery Room with sounds of the seashore game, a touch table and other kid friendly activities; the park film is shown upon request; book store; Ranger programs and free Junior Ranger and Junior Ranger Adventures activity guides This visitor center is located on the eastern end of Harkers Island, approximately 20 mi (30 km) east of Beaufort, NC and 30 mi (50 km) south of the Cedar Island terminus of the North Carolina State Ferry route from Ocracoke Island to Cedar Island. This visitor center is one of two Ferry Gateways to the Cape Lookout Light Station and Shackleford Banks. Light Station Visitor Center Available Facilities: Restrooms, first aid, shade shelter, water fountain. Purchase tickets for climbing the lighthouse at the ticket window. Also available: park passport stamp station, free Jr Ranger & Jr Ranger Activity guides, bookstore, beach wheelchair (free rental) Located on South Core Banks near the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, this visitor center is reached only by the park ferry or private boat. Open from mid-March through October, 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM daily. Located on South Core Banks 3 miles offshore from the Harkers Island Visitor Center, the primary way to reach the Light Station Vistior Center is by the passenger ferry or taking your personal boat. Visitors with 4-wheel drive vehicles may take the vehicle ferry from Davis to the Great Island Cabin Camp on South Core Banks and drive the 10 miles down the beach to the entrance from the "backroad" between Ramp 40 & Ramp 41. Portsmouth Visitor Center Located in the historic Theodore & Annie Salter House (The first house on the right of the path from Haulover Dock) in Portsmouth Village on North Core Banks. Available Facilities: Restrooms, first aid, park passport stamp; Exhibits on maritime history and village life Portsmouth Village is located on the northern tip of North Core Banks adjacent to Ocracoke Inlet. Currently the only way to reach Portsmouth Village is by passenger ferry from Ocracoke, NC. This 30 minute ride across the 5 miles from Silver Lake Harbor on Ocracoke down to the ferry dock in the village is done by small, flat bottom boats. Great Island Cabin Camp Great Island Cabin Camp offers 23 rustic, wooden beachfront cabins with porches for individuals and families or small groups of up to 12 people. Cabins range in size from 288 to 960 sq ft., and Cabin 2 is accessible. All cabins are wired for generator use, needed to power electricity. Guests must provide their own generators, no larger than 5,500 watts or equipped with a GFI. 4-person cabins 80.00 Each cabin contains bunk beds and mattresses, a private bath with sink and shower stall, a hot water heater, a table and chairs. Small kitchens are equipped with cabinets and a propane oven/stove. There are no refrigerators. A grill is just outside each cabin. Campers must provide their own linens, bedding, cookware, food and food storage, coolers, first-aid supplies and anything else needed during their stay. If not using a generator - flashlights and camping lanterns for light inside the cabin. 6-person cabins 120.00 Each cabin contains bunk beds and mattresses, a private bath with sink and shower stall, a hot water heater, a table and chairs. Small kitchens are equipped with cabinets and a propane oven/stove. There are no refrigerators. A grill is just outside each cabin. Campers must provide their own linens, bedding, cookware, food and food storage, coolers, first-aid supplies and anything else needed during their stay. If not using a generator - flashlights and camping lanterns for light inside the cabin. 8-person cabins 155.00 Each cabin contains bunk beds and mattresses, a private bath with sink and shower stall, a hot water heater, a table and chairs. Small kitchens are equipped with cabinets and a propane oven/stove. There are no refrigerators. A grill is just outside each cabin. Campers must provide their own linens, bedding, cookware, food and food storage, coolers, first-aid supplies and anything else needed during their stay. If not using a generator - flashlights and camping lanterns for light inside the cabin. 12-person cabins 180.00 Each cabin contains bunk beds and mattresses, a private bath with sink and shower stall, a hot water heater, a table and chairs. Small kitchens are equipped with cabinets and a propane oven/stove. There are no refrigerators. A grill is just outside each cabin. Campers must provide their own linens, bedding, cookware, food and food storage, coolers, first-aid supplies and anything else needed during their stay. If not using a generator - flashlights and camping lanterns for light inside the cabin. ADA/Wheelchair accessible cabin (sleeps 6) 120.00 Each cabin contains bunk beds and mattresses, a private bath with sink and shower stall, a hot water heater, a table and chairs. Small kitchens are equipped with cabinets and a propane oven/stove. There are no refrigerators. A grill is just outside each cabin. Campers must provide their own linens, bedding, cookware, food and food storage, coolers, first-aid supplies and anything else needed during their stay. If not using a generator - flashlights and camping lanterns for light inside the cabin. Great Island Cabin 5 Cabin 5 in Great Island showing the screen porch The screen porches on the cabins are a favorite spot to catch the breeze Great Island Cabin -- sleeps 12 Rustic wooden cabin sitting in the dunes Cabins in the camp are various sizes -- this one sleeps up to 12 people Great Island Cabin interior Rustic cabin interior showing bunk beds, kitchenette and doorway to restroom Although plain, the interior of the cabin is comfortable for those staying here Great Island Cabin office Two wooden buildings sit side-by-side At the cabin office questions can be answered as well as ice and emergency gas are for sale. Next door sits the cabin for the Volunteer caretakers. Island Roads a sand trail on the island shows the tracks of vehicle use The only "road" on the island is the one we call the "back road" as it runs down the island behind the dunes. It is a single lane wide and is unpaved throughout its length. South Core Banks -- Beach camping Dispersed camping along the ocean beach of this 20 mile long barrier island -- this is backcountry-style camping -- all camping is done directly on the ocean beach, there are no camp sites. This area is reached only by ferry. Both tent camping and vehicle camping is allowed. Vehicles -- 4x4 highly recommended -- must be able to drive on the soft sand of the beach and the sand trail behind the dunes known as the "back road". There are no hard surfaces on the island. Practice Leave No Trace principles. No Fee Camping 0.00 There is no fee charged for camping South Core Banks -- beach camping area Open beach with dunes on the right and ocean on the left Pick your camping spot -- primitive style dispersed camping is allowed on the beach, seaward of the dunes South Core Banks -- open beach for camping wide beach with dunes on right and ocean waves on left Where would you like to camp? This wide beach allows for dispersed camping seaward of the dunes along its length. South Core Banks -- wide beach for camping Sandy ocean beach with dunes on left and ocean waves on right The wide beaches of South Core Banks allow for dispersed camping directly on the beach. Choose your spot on the beach, seaward of the dunes, and relax. South Core Banks -- camping area wide sandy beach with dunes on left side and ocean waves on the right Picked your camping spot yet? The wide beaches of South Core Banks allow for dispersed camping between the dunes and the high tide line Cape Lookout Lighthouse : Black & white patterned tower of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse stands against a blue & white cloud f The Cape Lookout Lighthouse is still an active aid-to-navigation, warning ships of the nearby shoals. Climbing to up to see the view from the gallery level, 14 stories above the ground, is also a popular activity by visitors during the summer. Sea Oats Mature sea oat plant seed heads gracefully drooping in the sun In late summer, Sea Oats are the most conspicuous plant growing on the sand dunes with their graceful, drooping seed heads. Sanderlings small sandpipers poke their bills in the sand while waves break in the background Small sandpipers, called Sanderlings, are common sights on the ocean beach as they search for food in the sand between waves Relaxing by the Ocean 2 ladies sit in beach chairs on the sand with their feet in the water Watching the waves, feeling the cool sea breeze and the warmth of the sun make for a relaxing day. Surf fishing A surf fisherman stands in the water holding his surf rod and watching the waves Surf fishing is a popular pastime at the beach NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. aerial view of inlet Shark Awareness Before heading into the ocean, review some safety information to further minimize the chances of a shark encounter. Shark and fish in the blue ocean waters Southeast Coast Network News July 2018 Southeast Coast Inventory and Monitoring Network newsletter for July 2018. 2012 Cape Lookout National Seashore (CALO) Excavations Excavating a sand dune Excavating a sand dune 2014 Colonial Waterbirds Annual Report Cape Hatteras 2014 annual report on colonial waterbird monitoring at Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Black skimmers in their nesting colony 2014 Sea Turtle Annual Report Cape Hatteras 2014 annual report on sea turtle monitoring at Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Green sea turtle returning to sea after laying her eggs. 2014 Wilson's Plover Annual Report Cape Hatteras 2014 annual report on Wilson's plover monitoring from Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Wilson's Plover showing US Life-Saving Service The United States Life-Saving Service (USLSS), the predecessor to the United States Coast Guard, formed in 1878. The story of the USLSS dates to almost 100 years before the service became an official agency, to the noble efforts of the Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a group of affluent individuals seeking to prevent needless deaths from shipwrecks. A black and white photo of seven men wearing uniforms and standing in front of a boat house. SEAC Zooarcheologists Combine Sciences to Study the Past Diagram of great auk skeleton Diagram of great auk skeleton Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Fixed Station Monitoring Estuaries are the convergence of freshwater, delivered by rivers, to the ocean's salty sea water. The result is a delicate ecosystem providing existence for a multitude of fish and wildlife species. we have created the story map to help you learn more about how these estuaries formed, the potential issues they face, and the process of monitoring the water quality utilizing fixed station monitoring. Waterbirds congregate in an estuary at sunset. Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Park-wide Assessments Estuaries located in national parks provide recreational experiences such as fishing and boating for park visitors. Therefore, knowing what's in the water can assist the park in its mission of managing such a critcal resource. The Southeast Coast Network monitors water quality through fixed station monitoring and park-wide assessments. While the former is conducted on a monthly basis, park-wide assessments are completed every five years. Learn more with this story map. Dock stretching out into an estuary as the sun sets over the water. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains A Whole New World Does your family use olive oil? Many things that we use in our homes today have their origins in the Old World. When Spanish explorers and colonists came to the New World, they brought many things from their homes, and ways of using those things. Artist's painting of a ceramic olive oil jar and a glass jar of olive oil

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