by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Canyonlands

National Park - Utah

Canyonlands National Park in southeastern Utah is known for its dramatic desert landscape carved by the Colorado River. Island in the Sky is a huge, flat-topped mesa with panoramic overlooks. Other notable areas include the towering rock pinnacles known as the Needles, the remote canyons of the Maze and the Native American rock paintings in Horseshoe Canyon. Whitewater rapids flow through Cataract Canyon.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Canyonlands National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Canyonlands - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Canyonlands National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official trip planner map with mile markers of Canyonlands National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Canyonlands - Trip Planner With Mile Markers

Official trip planner map with mile markers of Canyonlands National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of The Heart of Canyonlands National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Canyonlands - The Heart of Canyonlands

Map of The Heart of Canyonlands National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Map (southern part) of the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Moab - Visitor Map - South

Visitor Map (southern part) of the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map 4 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County - Travel Plan - Map 4

Map 4 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.

Map 3 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County - Travel Plan - Map 3

Map 3 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.

Map 1 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County - Travel Plan - Map 1

Map 1 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.

Map of the San Juan County Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Travel Plan and Trail System. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - OHV Travel Plan and Trails

Map of the San Juan County Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Travel Plan and Trail System. Published by San Juan County.

brochures

The official newspaper of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Twelve pages of articles and visit recommendations. Includes maps of Island in the Sky and Needles. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Canyonlands Guides - Guide 2022

The official newspaper of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Twelve pages of articles and visit recommendations. Includes maps of Island in the Sky and Needles. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The official newspaper of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Twelve pages of articles and visit recommendations. Includes maps of Island in the Sky and Needles. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Canyonlands Guides - Guide 2021

The official newspaper of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Twelve pages of articles and visit recommendations. Includes maps of Island in the Sky and Needles. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Filled with fun activities, these 24-page booklets reveal the wonders of Canyonlands to kids and parents alike. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Canyonlands Guides - Junior Ranger Booklet

Filled with fun activities, these 24-page booklets reveal the wonders of Canyonlands to kids and parents alike. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads at Island in the Sky. Includes district map. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).District Maps and Guides - Island in the Sky Trails and Roads

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads at Island in the Sky. Includes district map. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads in The Maze. Includes district map. Also includes Orange Cliffs Unit of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Published by the U.S National Park Service (NPS).District Maps and Guides - The Maze Trails and Roads

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads in The Maze. Includes district map. Also includes Orange Cliffs Unit of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Published by the U.S National Park Service (NPS).

Introduction to the cultural history of Horseshoe Canyon. Includes map of access roads. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).District Maps and Guides - Horseshoe Canyon

Introduction to the cultural history of Horseshoe Canyon. Includes map of access roads. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads in The Needles. Includes district map. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).District Maps and Guides - The Needles Trails and Roads

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads in The Needles. Includes district map. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Trail guide of Roadside Ruin Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.Trail Guides - Roadside Ruin

Trail guide of Roadside Ruin Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.

Trail guide of Cave Spring Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.Trail Guides - Cave Spring

Trail guide of Cave Spring Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.

Trail guide of Pothole Point Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.Trail Guides - Pothole Point

Trail guide of Pothole Point Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.

Trail guide of Slickrock Foot Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.Trail Guides - Slickrock Foot

Trail guide of Slickrock Foot Trail in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park (NP). Published by Canyonlands Natural History Association.

https://www.nps.gov/cany https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canyonlands_National_Park Canyonlands National Park in southeastern Utah is known for its dramatic desert landscape carved by the Colorado River. Island in the Sky is a huge, flat-topped mesa with panoramic overlooks. Other notable areas include the towering rock pinnacles known as the Needles, the remote canyons of the Maze and the Native American rock paintings in Horseshoe Canyon. Whitewater rapids flow through Cataract Canyon. Canyonlands invites you to explore a wilderness of countless canyons and fantastically formed buttes carved by the Colorado River and its tributaries. Rivers divide the park into four districts: Island in the Sky, The Needles, The Maze, and the rivers themselves. These areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, but each offers different opportunities for sightseeing and adventure. Canyonlands National Park is cut into three land districts by the Green and Colorado rivers. Island in the Sky, in the north of the park, is about 40 minutes from Moab, UT via UT 313. The Needles district is in the southeast corner of Canyonlands, about 90 minutes from Moab or an hour from Monticello, UT via UT 211. The Maze district, in the west of the park, is the most remote and challenging; its ranger station is down 46 miles of dirt road from UT 24. All roads in The Maze require high-clearance 4WD. Canyonlands Backcountry Office The central backcountry office is located at park administrative offices south of Moab. Rangers can answer questions about backcountry travel over phone or email and issue permits online. Canyonlands administrative offices are about five miles south of Moab on US 191. Hans Flat Ranger Station The remote Hans Flat (Maze) Ranger Station is normally open daily year-round. This ranger contact station has a picnic table and vault toilet, and a small selection of books and maps for sale. There are no services, food, gas, trash collection, electricity for visitor use, nor potable water in The Maze. The nearest communities with amenities are Hanksville (68 miles) and Green River (86 miles). Getting to the Maze requires four-wheel-drive and a lot of time. To reach Hans Flat Ranger Station, from I-70 take UT 24 south for 24 miles. A left turn just beyond the turnoff to Goblin Valley State Park will take you along an unpaved, two-wheel-drive dirt road, 46 miles to the ranger station. Blowing sand dunes or precipitation can degrade the road condition at any time. Roads beyond the ranger station require high clearance and four-wheel drive year-round. Island in the Sky Visitor Center Visitor center normally offers: exhibits, book & map sales, backcountry permits, general information, vault toilets, and park rangers on duty. You can get drinking water inside (during open hours) or outside (24 hours a day). Exhibits and orientation movie, "Wilderness of Rock," are not currently open to the public. On US 191, drive 10 miles north of Moab or 22 miles south of Interstate 70 (Crescent Junction), then take UT 313 southwest for 22 miles. Follow signs for Canyonlands National Park. Drive time from Moab is roughly 40 minutes to the visitor center. The Needles Visitor Center The Needles Visitor Center normally offers exhibits, book & map sales, backcountry permits, information, picnic area, and park rangers on duty. The park orientation movie (15 minutes) is not currently showing. Water is available year-round. When the visitor center is closed in winter, you must self-register for backcountry permits outside the visitor center entrance. On US 191, drive 40 miles south of Moab, Utah, or 14 miles north of Monticello, Utah, then take UT 211 roughly 35 miles west. Highway 211 ends in The Needles, and is the only paved road leading in and out of the area. Island in the Sky (Willow Flat) Campground Island in the Sky Campground (Willow Flat) has 12 sites, first-come, first-served. The campground is open year-round. The spectacular Green River Overlook is nearby. Nightly camping fee is $15 per site. Sites fill quickly spring through fall. There are toilets, picnic tables, and fire rings in the campground. There is no water at the campground. You can get drinking water outside the visitor center spring through fall. Camping Site 15.00 Nightly fee per site at Willow Flat Campground. Group size limit is 10 people and two vehicles. Pull-through Campsite a paved parking area with a juniper tree and a shade structure in the distance Campsites at Island in the Sky can fit vehicles up to 28 feet in length. Accessible Site an accessible campsite with paved surfaces surrounding the site Willow Flat has one accessible campsite. Toilets A small, beige building. Vault toilets are available at Island in the Sky Campground. There is no water. Registration Board two upright bulletin board cases with a short, metal box next to them Campsites are first-come, first-served. You can self-register at the campground. Campsite a paved driveway with a shade structure and two tents in the background Campsites have shade structures, picnic tables, and paved parking areas. Green River Overlook a vast view of canyons and buttes with a river winding through the center Green River Overlook is just down the road from the campground. The Needles Campground The Needles Campground has 26 individual sites, plus 3 group sites in different locations around The Needles district. Nightly camping fee for an individual site is $20. You can reserve some individual sites spring through fall. Other times of the year, individual sites are first-come, first-served. You can also reserve group sites for nights between mid-March and mid-November. There are toilets, picnic tables, and fire rings in the campground. The Needles Campground Standard Site 20.00 Nightly fee for a standard Needles campsite. Group size limit is 10 people and 2 vehicles. If you are paying at the campsite, please pay within 30 minutes of occupying the site. Dutch Oven Group Site 11-20 Campers 90.00 Fee for one night at Dutch Oven Group Site for groups of 11-20 people. Dutch Oven Group Site 21-30 Campers 135.00 Fee for one night at Dutch Oven Group Site for groups of 21-30 people. Dutch Oven Group Site 31-40 Campers 180.00 Fee for one night at Dutch Oven Group Site for groups of 31-40 people. Dutch Oven Group Site 41-50 Campers 225.00 Fee for one night at Dutch Oven Group Site for groups of 41-50 people. Wooden Shoe Group Site 11-15 Campers 70.00 Fee for one night at Wooden Shoe Group Site for groups of 11-15 people. Wooden Shoe Group Site 16-20 Campers 90.00 Fee for one night at Wooden Shoe Group Site for groups of 16-20 people. Wooden Shoe Group Site 21-25 Campers 115.00 Fee for one night at Wooden Shoe Group Site for groups of 21-25 people. Split Top Group Site 11-15 Campers 70.00 Fee for one night at Split Top Group Site for groups of 11-15 people. Needles Campground a yellow tent nestled against a rock outcropping The Needles Flat Campground has shady sites against rock outcroppings. Needles Campground a campsite shaded by trees There are several options for shade at The Needles Campground Campsite a campsite with a gravel surface, fire ring, and picnic table Campsites include fire rings, tent pads, and picnic tables. Campsite a campsite parking area that is shaded by trees Most campsites have trees nearby. Accessible Site for People with Disabilities a campsite with a long paved driveway The Needles Campground has two accessible sites. One is always reserved for people with disabilities. Mesa Arch a broad stone arch with rock pinnacles in the distance Mesa Arch, at Island in the Sky, is a great spot for photographers. Pothole Point shallow pools with a double rainbow in the background Pothole Point Trail The Maze a rugged canyon The Maze is the most remote district of the park. Visiting requires four-wheel drive, self-reliance, and extra time. White Rim Road a long gravel road with cyclists on it The White Rim Road at Island in the Sky is a popular road for mountain bikers. The Needles in Chesler Park pinnacles of horizontally striped sandstone The Needles, pinnacles of Cedar Mesa Sandstone, are visible in many parts of the Needles District, including this view in Chesler Park. Boating on the Colorado River a person rowing a dory on the Colorado River Boating the Colorado and Green rivers is a popular activity at Canyonlands (permit required). Who Lives in the Park? Despite the harshness of the desert, wildlife is well adapted to living here. This virtual ranger activity will share some of the cool adaptations of Canyonlands National Park's wildlife. A bighorn sheep with large curling horns stands before a cliff wall. On the Edge: A Visit to Tower Ruin Read about a ranger's visit to Tower Ruin and her experience learning about the people who lived at the site. a stone structure in a rock alcove Searching For Treasure at Canyonlands National Park A series of roads, only one still distinct while the rest lie obscured by vegetation, reveal a human story: that of uranium miners exploring unfamiliar country with the hopes of becoming rich. By opening canyon county to travel, the miners blazed the trail for the establishment of Canyonlands National Park. mining equipment on a gravel road Veteran Story: John Schmitz John Schmitz served in the US Army and US Navy. Today he works in the facilities management division at Canyonlands National Park. He says, "I believe that serving in the NPS is an honor. Representing the NPS should not just be a job, but come as an opportunity to continue to serve our nation." a ranger in front of a sign reading NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Canyonlands National Park, Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. park scene canyons and mesas Lions Park: Moab’s Gateway to its Natural Wonders Once abandoned and unkempt, Lions Park in Moab, Utah, has been transformed into a bustling transit hub for millions of visitors each year. The National Park Service, in collaboration with the City of Moab and their partners, created a central place for visitors to arrive, acquaint themselves to the area, and access a state park and two national parks via active transportation routes. a park with trees, shade structure, and signs Desert Varnish Ever wondered what those dark lines were on the rock walls of canyon country? These black, brown, and red streaks are called desert varnish. streaks of black desert varnish on a red rock wall Ephemeral Pools Ephemeral pools are a vital source of water in a parched desert. grasses growing in a ephemeral pool filled with water Celebrating 50 Years of Partnership Canyonlands Natural History Association celebrated its 50th anniversary of partnering with public lands in southeast Utah. Since its founding in 1967, CNHA has donated over $12 million to Southeast Utah Group parks and its other federal partners—the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service. Superintendent Kate Cannon hands a plaque to CNHA Executive Director Roxanne Bierman Monsoon Season Late summer is monsoon season on the Colorado Plateau. Afternoon thunderstorms are common - flash floods and lightning are possible. Learn more about this special time of year and how to plan for it. rainstorm over Canyonlands Upheaval Dome Canyonlands is a place of relative geologic order. Layers of sedimentary deposits systematically record chapters in the park's past. Upheaval Dome is quite a different story. In an area approximately three miles (5 km) across, rock layers are dramatically deformed. In the center, the rocks are pushed up into a circular structure called a dome, or an anticline. Surrounding this dome is a downwarp in the rock layers called a syncline. What caused these folds at Upheaval Dome? red and white folded rock formations in the center of a large crater Veteran Story: Mark Olson Mark Olson served in the US Army as an infantryman from 2005-2011. Today he continues in public service as a backcountry reservations specialist at Canyonlands National Park, helping people safely enjoy the park's extensive backcountry. a ranger stands in a forest with a waterfall in the background Landbird Monitoring in Northern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 2018 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2018. Small, bright-orange bird with yellowish underfeathers. PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Volunteer Story: Two Volunteers Named Ted A father/son team of Sierra Club volunteers take a break to chat about why they serve. two smiling men in safety vests with paint brushes Needles In the southeast corner of Canyonlands, spires of Cedar Mesa Sandstone rise hundreds of feet above a network of canyons and grasslands know as "The Needles." shallow stone pools in front of rock spires with red and white striping Surviving in the Desert In this arid land, plants and animals must adapt to constantly changing water availability. red blooms on cluster of claret cup cactus The Grabens The Grabens in The Needles district of Canyonlands is a system of linear collapsed valleys caused by the movement of underlying salt layers toward the Colorado River canyon. The grabens begin near the Confluence of the Green and Colorado rivers and run roughly parallel to Cataract Canyon for 25 km, veering slightly westward before they end. an aerial view of two valleys with a ridge between them Solar Power at The Maze Since November of 1995, solar power has provided electricity for the facilities at Hans Flat. The system was installed through a partnership between the National Park Service and the Utah Office of Energy and Resource Planning. solar panels in a grassy field Veteran Story: William Bouley Bill Bouley served in the US Army for 20 years. Today he continues in public service as a Safety Manager for several parks and monuments in southern Utah. Bill Bouley, in uniform, with a helicopter in the background Veteran Story: Michael Frederick Michael served as an embassy guard in Luxembourg and Cyprus. He also served two deployments on board the USS Saratoga. Today he works as a lead park guide at Canyonlands National Park. He helps people connect with and enjoy the scenery and adventure that can be found during a visit to Canyonlands. a ranger in uniform with flat, straw hat Preserving the Past in Salt Creek Archeologists spent several weeks preserving structures and features in Salt Creek Archeological District in Canyonlands National Park. These sites were constructed by the ancestral Puebloan and Fremont people. a stone structure with green plants at the base Using Screens for Grassland Restoration Staff at Canyonlands and Arches national parks are installing connectivity modifiers or "ConMods" to create a protected environment for native grasses to take root. The focus is to use the ConMods to restore grasslands that had been degraded following decades of concentrated cattle grazing. a field with x-shaped screens standing in the soil Analysis and Dating of the Great Gallery Tool and Food Bag In 2005, visitors to the Great Gallery discovered a leather bag eroding from eolian sand. Fearing unlawful removal of the bag, a park ranger recovered the item on the day of its discovery. The authors, from the Navajo Nation Archeology Department obtained the bag and its contents on loan from the National Park Service to conduct the analysis reported here. two leather pouches Park Air Profiles - Canyonlands National Park Air quality profile for Canyonlands National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Canyonlands NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Canyonlands NP. Fort Bottom ruin, the Colorado River, and Canyonlands The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument Traits, Tradeoffs, and Pivot Points: How Climate, Plant, and Soil Properties Affect Vegetation Growth on the Northern Colorado Plateau As the northern Colorado Plateau heads into a hotter, drier future, there will be ecological winners and losers. Figuring out how different vegetation communities will fare is tricky. A recent study aimed to identify which vegetation communities might come out ahead, which might lag behind, and what might make the difference. Desert grassland in red rock setting. Pink wildflowers grow in foreground as storm brews in the sky. Studying the Fate of Arches Park staff and scientists study geological change in the natural arches of Utah. Monitoring devices, like the crackmeter, measure vibration and expansion in arches that are actively eroding. The data collected could determine potential safety risks in the future. a park ranger looks at a computer with two large arches in the background Students Explore Parks through the Arts As part of their school curriculum, third and fourth grade students in Moab explore national parks through the arts. The students create artwork in the parks and share their creations through an annual art show. The "Look Where We Live" program began in 2013 as a collaborative project between HMK Elementary School, Arches and Canyonlands national parks, Beverly Taylor Sorensen Arts Learning Program, and Friends of Arches and Canyonland National Parks. students hold up artwork beneath a massive stone arch Gnats In the late spring and early summer, swarms of tiny biting gnats often greet visitors to Utah national parks. These miniscule pests thrive in the scattered pinyon-juniper forests of southeast Utah. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Northern Colorado Plateau Park Waters Pesticides, antibiotics, and personal care products are all being found in streams and rivers. But would you expect to find them in a national park? On the northern Colorado Plateau, scientists found that even in isolated areas, these "contaminants of emerging concern" are not uncommon. Find out what we found where--and how you can help. Ripples in cave water Reading Rock Markings If you travel the canyons of the American Southwest, you are sure to see figures carved or painted on rock faces. These include abstractions like spirals, dots and geometric patterns, or more recognizable forms like animals, humans, and handprints. They served to communicate among American Indian tribes throughout the centuries, and they continue to communicate today. depictions of bighorn sheep and riders on horseback pecked into a rock wall Studying River Deposits at Hardscrabble Bottom Researchers dug a trench at Hardscrabble Bottom to expose deposits of river sediment. The researchers can then date by various methods including counting of growth rings in buried stems of tamarisk. a deep trench with people standing in it Douglas Fir in the Desert - A Relict Population Ranger Tim shares insight into a relict population of Douglas fir in Canyonlands National Park with a beautiful video and a virtual ranger activity. Tall Douglas fir coniferous trees tower before a sandstone alcove Animal-Transmitted Diseases in Southeast Utah Some diseases can be passed from animals to humans. Never approach wildlife and learn other ways to protect yourself from animal-transmitted diseases in Southeast Utah parks. Small brown and tan rodent standing up on hind legs, with soil and green vegetation around it. Biological Soil Crust of Southeast Utah Be careful where you step because the dirt is alive! This bumpy, lumpy, crust black soil is called biological soil crust and is made up of living organisms. bumpy black soil crust with lichen Lichens of Southeast Utah Those bright colors you may see on sandstone and biological soil crust are alive! Lichens grow in every size, shape, and color in Southeast Utah. scaly gray lichen growing on dark soil crust Plant Salvage Partnership Volunteers from a local Federal cleanup site joined park staff in a mutually beneficial partnership to rescue and relocate some native plants. two volunteers in neon vests carefully lift bunchgrass for transplanting House Rules for Visiting Archeological Sites in Southeast Utah Visiting a Southeast Utah park? These parks contain sacred areas and ancestral homeland of over 30 traditionally associated Native American Tribes. Learn how to be a respectful guest at cultural sites with these house rules. Two people stand and look at a circular tower constructed out of rocks. The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand The Names of Canyonlands Scavenger Hunt Can you find some of the special places within Canyonlands National Park with the park map? This activity will test your ability to read a map while also sharing some of the stories behind the names that fill this landscape. Two rivers meet in a deep canyon What We’re Learning and Why it Matters: Long-Term Monitoring on the Northern Colorado Plateau Knowing which key natural resources are found in the national parks, and whether they're stable or changing, helps decisionmakers make sound choices. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network is building that knowledge. After more than ten years of monitoring, we've learned a lot about park ecosystems, how they're changing, and what they may look like in the days to come. Find out what we’ve learned and how it’s being used to help managers plan for the future. Man stands in a stream, looking down at a handheld gauge. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2019 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2019. Bald eagle National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Seeing Rock Markings in a New Way In 2007, a volunteer used special photography techniques and equipment to "see" various layers of rock art panels in Arches and Canyonlands national parks. This enabled us to see how much more complex these ancient rock paintings and peckings are than originally thought. a black and white photo of various human-like figures painted on a rock wall Water Quality in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network: Water Years 2016–2018 Once a month, ecologists collect water samples at dozens of monitoring sites in and near ten National Park Service units across Utah and Colorado. This consistent, long-term monitoring helps alert managers to existing and potential problems. Find out the results for 2016-2018 in this brief from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network. A monitoring crew of three samples a clear river flowing over brown rock and sand A Closer Look at When Grasses Need a Drink: Soils, Precipitation, and Desert Grasses The results of a recent study may help land managers to prioritize grassland conservation and restoration efforts. Park managers can’t do much about climate, but with the right information, they can make choices based on how different grassland communities behave in different soil types. In this study, cool-season grasses showed more resilience to drought than warm-season grasses. A field crew member takes measurements on a grassland transect. The Science of Conserving Native Fish: Mitigating Potential Effects of Flow Experiments along the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument On the Green River, scientists are helping ensure that solving one problem doesn’t cause another for native fish. Analyzing long-term monitoring data collected in Dinosaur National Monument allowed them to suggest modifications to proposed experimental flows from Flaming Gorge Dam. The modifications may provide long-term benefits to Colorado pikeminnow. River camp and canyon wall Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Triassic Period—251.9 to 201.3 MYA The brightly colored Triassic rocks of Petrified Forest National Park yield not only the petrified trees but many other plant and animal fossils. fossil footprint on stone Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Round-up Donations Add Up to Big Support If you tell our bookstore partner to "keep the change," those pennies lead to big support for park programs. A clerk ringing up a customer at Arches' bookstore Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2020 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2020. Small beige bird with black beak and feet, brown back. Keeping Up with the Contaminants: Monitoring the Impact of Improved Wastewater Technology on the Colorado River Near Arches and Canyonlands National Parks In Moab, Utah, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network is helping to determine if improved methods of wastewater treatment can help reduce the presence of unregulated contaminants in effluent. The results have important implications for water quality in some of our nation’s most treasured rivers—and the news is good. A brownish river runs through rugged canyon walls Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Canyonlands Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for visiting Canyonlands National Park Climate Smart Conservation Planning for the National Parks In response to climate change, park managers are having to rethink how they plan for the future. Climate Smart Conservation is a process that can help managers achieve goals in the face of coming changes. Under this framework, scientists and managers use their collective knowledge to anticipate problems and be proactive, rather than reactive. Pika with a mouthful of grass Monitoring From Space: Using Satellite Imagery to Measure Landscape Conditions on the Ground Scientists from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network travel thousands of miles each year to collect data on plants, soils, and water across network parks. But it would be impossible to cover every square inch of the Northern Colorado Plateau with boots on the ground. Instead, we simultaneously monitor the parks with boots in space—satellite data that provide information at a much broader scale. Satellite and Earth in space Responding to Climate Change in the Southeast Utah Parks This paper describes how the Southeast Utah Group of parks is responding to climate change. The paper summarizes expected future climate conditions compared with a 20th Century baseline. It describes the foundation of our work within the Climate Smart Conservation framework adopted at our initial workshop in December 2018. A photograph of a grassland, containing some shrubs. Localized Drought Impacts on Northern Colorado Plateau Landbirds Birds of the desert southwest, a climate-change hotspot, are among the most vulnerable groups in the US. To help park managers plan for those changes, scientists evaluated the influence of water deficit on landbird communities at 11 national parks in Utah and Colorado. The results will help land managers to focus conservation efforts on places where certain species are most vulnerable to projected climate changes. A man wearing a clipboard looks through binoculars at dawn in field of sagebrush Series: Intermountain Park Science 2021 Integrating Research and Resource Management in Intermountain National Parks Group of National Park Service staff and volunteers standing in front of a desert canyon. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Water Resources on the Colorado Plateau Describes the origin, uses, threats to, and conservation of water on the Colorado Plateau. Dark green body of water winding through red rock formations with brilliant sun overhead. A 20-year Partnership between the Utah Geological Survey and the National Park Service to Inventory and Monitor Fossil Resources in Utah's National Parks The Utah Geological Survey has worked in partnership with the National Park Service to document the fossils of Utah’s national parks for 20 years, helping to bring to light and protect a wide variety of fossils. photo of a person pointing at trace fossils in rock above on an over hanging rock Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 1, Spring 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> photo of 2 people kneeling in shallow water at the base of a steep slope

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