"Oakland Plantation Bottle Garden" by NPS/Photo , public domain

Cane River Creole

National Historical Park - Louisiana

The Cane River Creole National Historical Park serves to preserve the resources and cultural landscapes of the Cane River region in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. Located along the Cane River Lake, the pak includes two French Creole cotton plantations, Oakland and Magnolia. Both plantations are complete in their historic settings, including landscapes, outbuildings, structures, furnishings, and artifacts; and they are the most intact French Creole cotton plantations in the United States. In total, 65 historic structures and over a million artifacts enhance the National Park Service mission as it strives to tell the story of the evolution of plantation agriculture through the perspective of the land owners, enslaved workers, overseers, skilled workers, and tenant farmers who resided along the Cane River for over two hundred years.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/cari/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cane_River_Creole_National_Historical_Park The Cane River Creole National Historical Park serves to preserve the resources and cultural landscapes of the Cane River region in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. Located along the Cane River Lake, the pak includes two French Creole cotton plantations, Oakland and Magnolia. Both plantations are complete in their historic settings, including landscapes, outbuildings, structures, furnishings, and artifacts; and they are the most intact French Creole cotton plantations in the United States. In total, 65 historic structures and over a million artifacts enhance the National Park Service mission as it strives to tell the story of the evolution of plantation agriculture through the perspective of the land owners, enslaved workers, overseers, skilled workers, and tenant farmers who resided along the Cane River for over two hundred years. The Cane River region is home to a unique culture; the Creoles. Generations of the same families of owners and workers, enslaved and tenant, lived on these lands for over 200 years. The park tells their stories and preserves the cultural landscape of Oakland and Magnolia Plantations, two of the most intact Creole cotton plantations in the United States. To reach Oakland Plantation, take I-49 to Exit 127, Flora/Cypress. Head east on LA Highway 120 toward Cypress. Cross over LA Highway 1 onto LA Highway 494. The parking lot and entrance pavilion for Oakland is 4.5 miles east of Highway 1 on the left. To reach the grounds of Magnolia Plantation, take I-49 to Exit 119, Derry. Head east on LA Highway 119. Cross over LA Highway 1 and proceed for 1.1 miles. The parking area of Magnolia Plantation is on the right just before the road closure. Magnolia Plantation Store The park does not have a visitor center, though the Magnolia Plantation Store serves as a seasonal visitor contact station as staffing allows. The store houses visitor restrooms, passport stamps, and informational brochures. Visitor restrooms are open daily even if the Store is not staffed. Oakland Plantation Store The park does not have a visitor center, though the Oakland Plantation Store is the park's main visitor contact station. Inside the store you'll find historic exhibits, NPS passport stamps, Junior Ranger books, and a gift shop. To reach Oakland Plantation, take I-49 to Exit 127, Flora/Cypress. Head east on LA Highway 120 toward Cypress. Cross over LA Highway 1 onto LA Highway 494. The parking lot and entrance pavilion for Oakland is 4.5 miles east of Highway 1 on the left. To reach the grounds of Magnolia Plantation, take I-49 to Exit 119, Derry. Head east on LA Highway 119. Cross over LA Highway 1 and proceed for 1.1 miles. The parking area of Magnolia Plantation is on the right just before the road closure. Oakland Plantation Quarters A small cabin sits beneath the branches of a Live Oak in the Oakland Plantation Quarters. One of two remaining cabins built for enslaved workers on Oakland Plantation. The cabin was lived in by sharecroppers into the 1960s. Magnolia Plantation Overseer's House A raised Creole cottage surrounded by oak trees. Originally built as a hospital for the enslaved workers on Magnolia Plantation, this raised Creole cottage also served as home to the plantation Overseer. Live Oak Trees The sunrise shines through Live Oak trees at Oakland Plantation. Live Oak trees at sunrise on Oakland Plantation. Cabins in the Magnolia Plantation Quarters Brick cabins built to house enslaved workers, served as homes for tenant farmers into the 1960s. These brick cabins were built in the 1840s to house enslaved workers on Magnolia Plantation. Following Emancipation the cabins served as homes for tenant farmers. Oak Allee Two rows of Live Oak trees stretch from the Cane River to the Oakland Plantation Main House. The Oak Allee, planted in the mid-1820s, stretches from the Cane River to the Oakland Plantation Main House. Magnolia Plantation Cotton Gin and Press Barn This wood screw cotton press was used at Magnolia Plantation to form cotton into bales for market. The Magnolia Plantation Gin Barn houses this rare wood screw cotton press. Cane River Music Festival The annual Cane River Music Festival celebrates the tradition of live music on the landscape of Cane River Creole National Historical Park. It began with early "juré singing" without instrumentation, evolved into a style that incorporated rhythm and blues with accordion, saxophone, and washboard. Today, contemporary musicians play Creole music inspired by tradition and newer influences. Creole culture was and continues to be a blend of continuity and change. A musician holds a round-bodied cheesebox guitar in both hands at the 2012 music festival. Reconstruction During Reconstruction, the Federal government pursued a program of political, social, and economic restructuring across the South-including an attempt to accord legal equality and political power to former slaves. Reconstruction became a struggle over the meaning of freedom, with former slaves, former slaveholders and Northerners adopting divergent definitions. Faced with increasing opposition by white Southerners and some Northerners, however, the government abandoned effor Picture depictsing former slaves and free blacks voting following the passage of the 15th amendment Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house Slavery on the Magnolia Plantation Learn about the lives of the enslaved on the Magnolia Plantation, one of the South's most complete plantation complexes, with buildings and landscape features spanning its entire 250-year history. These building include slave/tenant cabins. a ranger walks with a small family in front of brick quarters Code Noir The Code Noir initially took shape in Louis XIV’s edict of 1685. Although subsequent decrees modified a few of the code’s provisions, this first document established the main lines for the policing of slavery right up to 1789. The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg The Civil War in American Memory America's cultural memories of the Civil War are inseparably intertwined with that most "peculiar institution" of American history - racial slavery. But in the struggle over Civil War memory which began as soon as the war was over and continues to this day, rival cultural memories of reconciliation and white supremacy have often prevailed. Therein lies the challenge as the National Park Service - a public agency - seeks to "provide understanding" of the Civil War era's lasting impact upon the development of our nation. Elderly Union and Confederate veterans shake hands at the fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Limewash: An Old Practice and a Good One Historically, plantation landscapes were limewashed or “whitewashed.” The reasons behind this centuries old practice are both aesthetic and practical. Limewashed structures brighten up the surroundings and look great because it glows due to innumerable small crystals. But did you know that limewash is a fire retardant, antiseptic, antifungal, odorless and non-allergic paint? Creole Architecture Article on Creole Architecture along Cane River in the Natchitoches, Louisiana region. Southern Live Oak at Oakland Plantation A double row of live oak trees, known as an allée, is a character-defining feature of historic plantations in the southern United States. Based on their size and family tradition, the live oak allée at Oakland Plantation was likely planted in the 1820s during the time that Emanuel Prud’homme owned and operated the plantation. The allée was designed to create a dramatic entrance to the house and an appearance of order and prosperity. Light filters through the leaves on long, curving branches of two rows of live oak trees, over turf.

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