"Hog Rock Springtime View" by Volunteer John Zuke , public domain

Catoctin Mountain

Park - Maryland

Catoctin Mountain Park, located in north-central Maryland, is part of the forested Catoctin Mountain ridge−range that forms the northeastern rampart of the Blue Ridge Mountains, in the Appalachian Mountains System. The park features sparkling streams and panoramic vistas of the Monocacy Valley.

maps

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Catoctin Mountain Park in Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Catoctin Mountain - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Catoctin Mountain Park in Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/cato/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catoctin_Mountain_Park Catoctin Mountain Park, located in north-central Maryland, is part of the forested Catoctin Mountain ridge−range that forms the northeastern rampart of the Blue Ridge Mountains, in the Appalachian Mountains System. The park features sparkling streams and panoramic vistas of the Monocacy Valley. President Franklin D. Roosevelt created programs to give people a chance to rebuild their lives from the Great Depression. The Works Progress Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps gave this land a second opportunity and through re-growth, a new role as a recreation area. To reach the visitor center from the east, follow US Route 15 to MD Route 77 and go west about 3 miles. The visitor center is on the right side of the road. From the west, take I 70 to MD 66 at exit 35. Turn left onto MD 66 north and travel about 5 miles, passing through the roundabout. Turn right onto MD 64 and drive 1 mile. Turn right onto MD 77. Drive on MD 77 about 7.5 miles. The visitor center is on the left. Visitor Center The visitor center hosts new exhibits, installed in spring 2019. Learn about the history of Catoctin Mountain and the national park that was created here. American Indians, farmers, iron makers, the WPA, CCC, Jobs Corps and so many others played a role in making Catoctin Mountain Park the special place it is today. Discover how even your visit plays a part in the making of this park. Eastern National provides a small sales area with items to help you remember your visit. To reach the visitor center from the east, follow US Route 15 to MD Route 77 and go west about 3 miles. The visitor center is on the right side of the road. From the west, take I 70 to MD 66 at exit 35. Turn left onto MD 66 north and travel about 5 miles, passing through the roundabout. Turn right onto MD 64 and drive 1 mile. Turn right onto MD 77. Drive on MD 77 about 7.5 miles. The visitor center is on the left. Adirondack Shelters Reservations Required. No Walk Ins. There are two shelters that offer the bare minimum with regard to outdoor accommodation. Available year-round, the Adirondack Shelters located near the northern most point of the park, provide a destination for true nature immersion and an alternative to drive-up camping. A moderate three-mile uphill hike over rocky and gently rolling terrain starting at Camp Round Meadow will lead you to these three-sided shelters. Reservation Fee 10.00 A reservation fee is charged for use of the shelters. Adirondack Shelter Three-sided wooden shelter Two 3-sided shelters offer back-country solitude for hike-in campers. Camp Greentop Reservations Required. No Walk-Ins. Camp Greentop is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a Historic District. This cabin camp facility is a perfect location for organized groups to hold retreats and conferences. Camp Greentop is a cabin camp facility for large groups. The camp has space for 140 people to sleep on twin beds. Entire Facility, Per Night: Friday-Saturday 1000.00 Entire facility sleeps 140 people in cabins. The dining hall seats 140 people and features a commercial kitchen with electric ranges and ovens. The recreation hall is a large, open room equipped with a stage. It is suitable for meetings, receptions or a variety of other uses. These buildings are heated, but the fireplaces are not usable. The swimming pool is open Memorial Day to Labor Day and can be used if a lifeguard is present. Entire Facility, Per Night: Sunday-Thursday, 600.00 Entire facility sleeps 140 people in cabins. The dining hall seats 140 people and features a commercial kitchen with electric ranges and ovens. The recreation hall is a large, open room equipped with a stage. It is suitable for meetings, receptions or a variety of other uses. These buildings are heated, but the fireplaces are not usable. The swimming pool is open Memorial Day to Labor Day and can be used if a lifeguard is present. Good Luck Lodge #64 100.00 A cabin that sleeps 3 people. Staff Quarters #58 120.00 A cabin that sleeps 4. Cabin #71 120.00 A cabin that sleeps 4. Infirmary #57 60.00 A cabin that sleeps 5 people. Camp Greentop A one story building with trees behind them and a totem poll in front. The Camp Greentop Office features a colorful totem poll. Greentop Cabin Wooden Cabin in the woods One of 16 cabins for lodging at Camp Greentop Greentop Cabin Interior The inside of a cabin shows bunk beds Guests sleep on vinyl matresses atop wooden beds Greentop Central Shower Brown wooden building Campers shower in one of the central shower buildings Camp Misty Mount Reservations Required. No Walk Ins. Camp Misty Mount is a cabin rental facility for individuals, families, or small groups. This historic cabin camp was completed in 1937 by the Works Progress Administration. The camp is surrounded by hardwood forests on the slopes of Catoctin Mountain Park. The region is part of the Blue Ridge Province and offers scenic mountain views and clear streams. Cabins for 3, 4 or 6 people 50.00 Cabins sleep 3,4 or 6 people on single beds with vinyl covered mattresses. Guests bring their own linens. There is overhead lighting but no electrical outlets, running water or heat. Central restrooms and showers are available. Lodges Sleep 8 People 100.00 Lodges sleep 8 people on single beds with vinyl covered mattresses. Guests bring their own linens. There is overhead lighting but no electrical outlets, running water, or heat. Central restrooms and showers are available. Cabin 16 Sleeps 6 140.00 Cabin 16 sleeps 6 people in 3 different bedrooms on single beds with vinyl covered mattresses. Guests bring their own bedding. There is a small bathroom with a flush toilet and hot shower. There is also a kitchenette with a small refrigerator, microwave and sink in the cabin. Dining Hall Friday - Saturday 360.00 Dining Hall available with minimum rental of 8 cabins. Contact park to reserve. Cost: Friday - Saturday $360 per night. Dining Hall Sunday - Thursday 110.00 Dining Hall available with minimum rental of 8 cabins. Contact park to reserve. Cost: Sunday - Thursday $110 per night A Cabin at Historic Camp Misty Mount Wooden cabin in the woods Enjoy a stay in one of the rustic cabins at Camp Misty Mount. Camp Round Meadow Reservations Required. No Walk-Ins. Camp Round Meadow is a group camp featuring 4 heated dorms that sleep 30 people each (total 120). Each dorm has bathrooms with flush toilets, hot showers, and electric outlets. Cots with vinyl mattresses are provided. Campers bring bedding, toiletries, toilet paper and towels, and cleaning supplies. Brooms and mops are provided. Additional facilities include a dining hall, gymnasium, classrooms, a conference room, and a small outdoor gazebo. Camp Round Meadow Friday - Saturday Rates 1000.00 Rental includes: 3 Dorms, Gymnasium with Classrooms, and Dining Hall Friday - Saturday Rate: $1000 per night Camp Round Meadow Sunday - Thursday Rates 600.00 Rental includes: 3 Dorms, Gymnasium with Classrooms, and Dining Hall Sunday - Thursday Rate: $600 per night Handicapped Accessible dorms are available. Use of alcohol is prohibited. Service Animals Only. Reservations Required. No Walk-Ins Camp Round Meadow Dorm Exterior One story brown wooden building Dormitories sleep up to 30 campers Wheel Chair Accessible Dorm One story brown wooden building with ramp One of the four Camp Round Meadow dorms has a ramp for wheelchair access. Round Meadow Campfire Circle Wooden benches surrounding a metal fire ring Groups can enjoy campfire activities Round Meadow Dorm Interior Sleeping cots inside a large room Campers sleep on single cots with vinyl matresses Round Meadow Dining Hall Open room with windows Campers can enjoy meals in the dining hall Owens Creek Campground Reservations Required. No Walk-Ins. Owens Creek Campground offers family camping in a wooded setting. There are 50 sites, 3 are ADA accessible. Maximum trailer length is 22 feet. One vehicle is permitted per site. A picnic table and fire ring are provided at each site. There are 2 comfort stations and hot showers, but there are no hook-ups. Firewood is available, with a donation suggested. Use of alcohol is prohibited. Pets allowed and must leashed and tended to at all time. Camping Fee 30.00 Fee provides for overnight camping. No hookups are available, but restrooms, hot showers, and potable water are available at no extra cost. Firewood is available for a small fee. Campground Entrance Sign Campground entrance sign The campground entrance is on Foxville Deerfield Road. Campsite at Owens Creek Red tent and camping gear on campsite One of 50 wooded campsites at Owens Creek Campground Popup Camper at Owens Creek Popup camper in wooded campground Trailers up to 22 feet can be accommodated. No hookups are available. Poplar Grove Youth Group Tent Campground Reservations Required. No Walk-Ins. Poplar Grove is open to adult supervised organized youth groups whose members are under age 18. There are 3 sites within Poplar Grove. Each site accommodates up to 25 persons. Groups share pit toilets, water and a pavilion. Each site has picnic tables, grills and a fire circle. Camping Fee 35.00 The fee is for $35 per night. Each site accommodates up to 25 people per site. Groups share pit toilets, water and a pavilion. Poplar Grove Tent Area Site A Numerous tents set up under forest canopy Poplar Grove Tent Area Site A Poplar Grove Covered Pavilion Area Poplar Grove Covered Pavilion Area Poplar Grove Covered Pavilion Area Poplar Grove Water Spigot Cooking pot hanging on water spigot Poplar Grove Water Spigot Chimney Rock Vista Rock formation with mountains in the background A challenging hike leads to Chimney Rock, the most popular vista in the park. Visitor Center A stone and wood building with plants and flowers in front First time visitors should begin their park experience at the visitor center. Eastern Mud Salamander A slender-bodied, red salamander with black spots across its body. Life is abundant at Catoctin Mountain Park, and habitat is plentiful for many salamander species. Big Hunting Creek A fast flowing stream cutting through a green forest. Winding its way through the ridge, Big Hunting Creek is a popular fly fishing destination. Historic Camp Misty Mount A log cabin in the woods Visitors can stay overnight in one of the historic Misty Mount cabins. Wolf Rock A large angular boulder that resembles the shape of a wolf. At the end of a boulder field the size of a football field, stands Wolf Rock. Do you see the wolf? Blue Ridge Summit A rocky outcrop nestled amongst trees overlooking a valley. Blue Ridge Summit offers hikers a view northward into Pennsylvania. Sun Rays Through the Forest at Misty Mount Multiple bright sun rays shining through a forest with log cabins. Natural beauty envelopes the mountainside throughout the day. The Horse Trail Two riders, on horseback, walking through a forested trail. The west side of the park is a popular trail riding destination. Chimney Rock in the Fall A large rocky outcropping overlooking a mountainside with fall foliage. Chimney Rock provides an excellent view of the mountain's fall foliage. Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit Lichens and Air Quality Lichens are durable enough to grow on tree bark and bare rock, yet are sensitive to pollution and air quality. One species in particular was used to track levels of air-borne lead over a 100 year period! Pale green lichen growing on rock. 2013 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service More than 200,000 volunteers provide invaluable time and energy to the National Park Service. Meet the people and groups being honored with a 2013 Hartzog Award. Group of cleanup volunteers with full trash bags Instructing for Dangerous Missions Creating the training process was a big challenge. To prepare spies, saboteurs, guerrilla leaders, radio operators, psychological warfare specialists and commando teams for their clandestine missions, the Office of Strategic Services had to obtain instructors, prepare a curriculum, develop courses, and devise practical exercises. Daily Life in Camp Park and Town During the recruiting process, the Office of Strategic Services was looking for a combination of intelligence, imagination, courage and, if necessary, ruthlessness. Most of the young recruits, that volunteered for possible hazardous duty, craved the excitement and challenge of a special overseas assignment. Bark Ranger Trail Stewards at Catcoctin Mountain Park We are looking for for friendly canines and their human companions to be a BARK Ranger Trail. Morale, Welfare and Recreation in WWII National Parks Wartime NPS Director Newton Drury wrote 'In wartime, the best function of these areas is to prove a place to which members of the armed forces and civilians may retire to restore shattered nerves and to recuperate physically and mentally for the war tasks still ahead of them.' During World War II, parks across the United States supported the morale of troops and sought to become places of healing for those returning from war. B&W; soldiers post in front of large tree A Wartime Organization for Unconventional Warfare With the onset of World War II, the OSS's secret operations—espionage, counter-intelligence, disinformation, and guerrilla leadership—expanded. Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. Catoctin and Prince William Parks Join the War Effort The decision to establish its first U.S. training camps at Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland, and Prince William Forest Park, Virginia, had been based on their’ rural, isolated location yet comparative proximity to the nation’s capital. American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall 2011 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Discover the innovative and exciting programs of the recipients of the national and regional 2011 Freeman Tilden Awards for excellence in interpretation. LIza Stearns 2015 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the recipients of the 2015 Freeman Tilden Awards, the highest National Park Service honor for interpretation, and learn more about their exciting programs. Ernie Price Converting Catoctin Mountain Park into Military Camps OSS men began to arrive on 1 April 1942, and started to convert their part of the park into a basic paramilitary training school. OSS in Action The Mediterranean and European Theaters In war it is the results that count, and the saboteurs and guerrilla leaders in Special Operations and the Operational Groups, the spies in Secret Intelligence, and the radio operators in Communications did produce some impressive results. Sustainability in Action: Reducing Catoctin Mountain Park’s Carbon Footprint NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] park view from high rock outcrop Preserving Natural Treasures: Removing Graffiti from Wolf Rock at Catoctin Mountain Park As early as the 1870s, the area along the Catoctin ridge was a popular hiking location to take in spectacular views from Wolf Rock and nearby Chimney Rock, and by the late 1930s nearly 30 miles of foot trails led to these places of scenic and geologic interest. Until recently, graffiti on Wolf Rock altered the views of this iconic feature. In April of 2018, the Mid-Atlantic Climbers organization teamed with the park to access and remove graffiti from the surface of Wolf Rock. A climber wearing a helmet, harness, and gloves uses a brush and bucket to remove paint from a rock. Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Disability History: The NPS and Accessibility The National Park Service strives to make its parks, monuments, and historic sites available to all. Programs, services, and products, such as Braille alternatives of print material, sign language interpretation of tours, accessible camping sites and trails, ramps and elevators make parks more accessible. These are essential to allowing the public to fully enjoy NPS resources. exterior of a log cabin Postwar Period: End of the OSS and Return to the Park Service The OSS may have won its battles in the field, but it lost its final campaign—in Washington. It was better prepared to fight armed enemies overseas than bureaucratic enemies in the nation’s capital. Summary and Conclusion The OSS training camps closed in 1945. The valuable contributions to the Allied victory made by those facilities and by Donovan’s organization itself are an important part of the history of World War II. OSS in Action The Pacific and the Far East Although the most publicized achievements of the OSS occurred in Europe and North Africa, Donovan’s organization also contributed to the war against Japan in the Far East. "Wild Bill" Donovan and the Origins of the OSS When World War II broke out in Europe in 1939, U.S. intelligence operations were splintered among nearly a dozen federal agencies. Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. Eastern Hemlocks in the National Capital Region Many evergreen, Eastern hemlock trees, typically found growing alongside forest streams, have succumbed to two insect pests. In the National Capital Region, we looked for surviving trees, and what other tree species are poised to replace hemlocks. An evergreen branch with white fuzzy nubs along the stems. DOI Region 1, National Capital Area Utilizes Prescribed Fire as a Management Tool Resource and facility managers in the National Capital Area (NCA) are relying more frequently on prescribed burning as a tool to protect, restore, enhance and maintain historic Civil War sites. Fire in grasses burn near a Civil War cannon. Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Catoctin Mountain Park Cultural Landscape Catoctin Mountain Park is a 5,770-acre park in the NW corner of Frederick County, MD managed by the NPS for public recreation and nature conservation. From (1770-1903) the landscape was utilized by the nearby iron furnace, an example of the nation’s early iron industry. From (1934-1942), a portion of the mountain landscape was recast for recreation and conservation when the federal government developed it as a recreational demonstration area (RDA). Catoctin Mountain Park (Catoctin Mountain Park: Cultural Landscapes Inventory, NPS, 2002) Camp Misty Mount Cultural Landscape Camp Misty Mount was known as Organized Group Camp 1-C when it was first developed in the 1930s. One of three camps in the Catoctin Recreational Demonstration Area, the development was part of the response by the Roosevelt Administration to the social and economic pressures of the Great Depression, specifically in connection with agricultural reform. The Rustic style summer camp opened in 1937. A row of Girl Scouts of the 1950s raise the American flag in front of a cabin. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Area parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo Office of Strategic Services The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was an intelligence gathering service from 1942-1945. Its espionage and sabotage operations were pioneered by an eclectic team that combined some of America's brightest minds with burglars and con men. Their work in World War II contributed to Allied victory. When the OSS was disbanded after the war in 1945, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) rose from its ashes. OSS spear logo Amphibian Disease Risk in the National Capital Area Looking for disease, including ranaviruses and chytrid fungi, is an important part of amphibian monitoring done by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Learn more about the risks posed by these diseases and the biosecurity protocols field crews use to reduce the risk of accidental spread. Red-spotted newt on brown forest floor leaves. Black spots and eyes contrast with vivid orange skin. Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. American Chestnuts in the Capital Region In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in parks of the National Capital Region Green American chestnut tree leaves on a slender branch. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Series: Disability History The Disability History series brings attention to some of the many disability stories interwoven across the National Park Service’s 400+ units and its programs. “Disability stories” refer to the array of experiences by, from, and about people with disabilities represented across our nation. People with disabilities are the largest minority in the United States, but their stories often remain untold. Statue of FDR in his wheelchair Series: OSS Training in the National Parks and Service Abroad in World War II Before there was the CIA, there was the OSS. The places where they trained for their dangerous mission are now national parks. William Donovan Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch Prescribed fire in the national capital area Learn how the National Park Service uses prescribed fire in the National Capital Area. Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling Cultural Resources and Climate Change Cultural resources are sites, structures, objects, and even landscapes that show the history of human activity and/or hold significance to a group of people traditionally associated with it. Climate change, however, is making it harder to preserve these cultural resources for future generations. Changing weather patterns, increased pests, and pollution all amplify the deterioration of our cultural and historical resources. Jefferson Memorial view from above with visitors on the steps Wildlife and Climate Change Climate change has produced a number of threats to wildlife throughout our parks. Rising temperatures lower many species survival rates due to changes that lead to less food, less successful reproduction, and interfering with the environment for native wildlife. These detrimental changes are already apparent in our National Capital Area parks. Great blue heron in a wetlands pond September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air. The Youth Conservation Corps at Catoctin Mountain Park In 1971, Catoctin Mountain Park became one of the first pilot residential program sites to host a group of young people as part of the Youth Conservation Corps. YCC participants and a park ranger stand in a stream with nets and waders in a freshwater stream African American Community Engagement in the 1960s: Summer in the Parks and the DC Environmental Outdoor Laboratory at Camp Round Meadow From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Catoctin Mountain Park managed two programs that provided African American youths from the Washington, D.C. metro area with opportunities for outdoor recreation and education through the Summer in the Parks program (1968–1976) and the DC Environmental Outdoor Laboratory (1970–1975).

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