"Capulin Volcano National Monument, New Mexico" by National Park Service , public domain

Capulin Volcano

National Monument - New Mexico

Capulin Volcano National Monument is a U.S. National Monument located in northeastern New Mexico which protects and interprets an extinct cinder cone volcano that is part of the Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field.

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Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - National Historic Trail

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Capulin Volcano National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Capulin Volcano - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Capulin Volcano National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/cavo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capulin_Volcano_National_Monument Capulin Volcano National Monument is a U.S. National Monument located in northeastern New Mexico which protects and interprets an extinct cinder cone volcano that is part of the Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field. Part of the 8,000 square mile Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field, Capulin Volcano showcases the volcanic geology of northeastern New Mexico. The views are spectacular day or night, with views of 4 different states from the volcanic rim and one of the darkest night skies in the country. Whether it's a quick stop or a day's trip, enjoy exploring the landscape of this unique volcano! Capulin Volcano National Monument is located in northeast New Mexico. The monument is located 33 miles east of Raton, NM, and 57 miles west of Clayton, NM on NM325 north of US64. No public transportation systems serve the park. Capulin Volcano Visitor Center The Visitor Center is at the base of Capulin Volcano and includes a fee and information station, exhibits, theater for the park film, restrooms, and a park bookstore. Hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m most of the year, except in the summer months (Memorial Day to Labor Day) when it is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Capulin Volcano National Monument is located in northeast New Mexico. The monument is located 33 miles east of Raton, NM, and 57 miles west of Clayton, NM. No public transportation systems serve the park. From US-64, turn on to NM-325 and head north for approximately 3 miles. The park entrance will be on the right. Follow the entrance road until you see the visitor center on the right. Capulin Volcano A cloud shrouded volcano rises behind a field of yellow flowers. Capulin Volcano in summer. Aerial View of Capulin Volcano View of cinder cone volcano and the road leading to the top of the volcano as seen from the air. Capulin Volcano is a classic example of a cinder cone. The crater is approximately 130 m (420 ft) deep and 440 m (1,450 ft) across. The base of the mountain is 6 km (4 mi) in circumference. Volcano Road spirals up the volcano, providing panoramic views. Nature Trail at Capulin Volcano A shaded bench on the side of a paved nature trail wending through juniper trees and grasses. A paved nature trail at Capulin Volcano NM. Volcano Road Layers of rock are visible in the steep hillside along a road. Layers of volcanic material can be seen in the Volcano Road that takes visitors to the top of Capulin Volcano. Capulin Volcano-Best Example of a Cinder Cone in North America View of a cinder cone volcano covered with grasses, small trees, and other plants. Although Capulin Mountain is considered no longer active, because its excellent condition, the cinder cone is considered one of the best and most accessible examples of a cinder cone in North America. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Capulin Volcano National Monument, New Mexico Capulin Volcano, which erupted 54,200 years ago within the easternmost young volcanic field in North America, is one of the most scenic and most accessible cinder cones on the continent. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. capulin volcano Air Quality Monitoring in the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert Networks Both the Clean Air Act and the National Park Service Organic Act protect air resources in national parks. Park resources affected by air quality include scenery and vistas, vegetation, water, and wildlife. Over the past three decades, the National Park Service has developed several internal and cooperative programs for monitoring various measures of air quality. Cactus and clear skies at Tonto National Monument Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Capulin Volcano Breeding Bird Inventory The first thorough survey for breeding birds at Capulin Volcano National Monument was conducted in 2002, by the New Mexico Natural Heritage Program. Mountain Chickadee Exotic Plants Monitoring in the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert National parks, like other publicly managed lands, are deluged by new exotic species arriving through predictable (e.g., road, trail, and riparian corridors), sudden (e.g., long distance dispersal through cargo containers and air freight), and unexpected anthropogenic pathways (e.g., weed seeds mixed in with restoration planting mixes). Landscape with a uniform, green foreground consisting of invasive kochia Capulin Goldenrod Capulin Volcano National Monument is located within a vegetative transitional zone between the Rocky Mountains and shortgrass prairie, resulting in a relatively high diversity of habitats for wildlife and plants not found elsewhere in the surrounding grasslands. Capulin goldenrod (<em>Solidago capulinensis</em>) is a rare plant found at the monument, and was first described and collected in 1936 by Cockerell and Andrews. Capulin goldenrod Capulin Alberta Arctic Butterfly The Capulin Alberta arctic butterfly was first found at Capulin Volcano National Monument’s crater rim in 1969 and was soon determined to be a new subspecies known only to the monument and some nearby areas. Capulin Alberta arctic butterfly specimen Pollinators - Hummingbirds Hummingbirds (family Trochilidae) are amazingly adapted pollinators, and they play an important role in pollination. A flying hummingbird hovers next to a red flower Pinyon-Juniper Habitat at Capulin Volcano National Monument Pinyon-juniper is one of the major habitat types found within Capulin Volcano National Monument and comprises approximately 59% of the monument’s total area. Pinyon-juniper and grasslands at Capulin Volcano National Monument Climate Change in the Southern Plains Network Climate change may have direct and/or indirect effects on many elements of Southern Plains network ecosystems, from streams and grasslands to fires and birds. Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) is an invasive plant that has invaded the Southern Plains Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Southwestern Plains The Plains of the Southwest include the southern Great Plains, the High Plains, Llano Estacado (Staked Plains), and Edwards Plateau. Sunset lights up the grass at Capulin Volcano National Monument Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Southern Plains Bird Inventories Birds are a highly visible component of many ecosystems and because they respond quickly to changes in resource conditions, birds are good indicators of environmental change. Bird inventories allow us to understand the current condition, or status, of bird populations and communities in parks. These data are important for managing birds and other resources and provide baseline information for monitoring changes over time. Violet-green swallow Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Women Who Were There No comprehensive data has been compiled about women government employees working in national parks before the NPS was founded on August 25, 1916. Their numbers are undoubtedly few but perhaps not as small as we might imagine. The four early NPS women featured here were exceptional in their own ways, but they are also proxies for the names we no longer remember and the stories we can no longer tell. Una Lee Roberts, 1933.(Courtesy of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, Gaylord-Pickens Museum)
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park News Newsletter The Capulin Title Chronicle Capulin Volcano Recipient of Three Grants from the National Park Foundation The National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, has been extremely generous to Capulin Volcano National Monument (CAVO) this year by awarding the park nearly $50,000 to enhance its educational offerings. Three grants were provided by the National Park Foundation, each for a specific purpose. “Climate change is a profound problem & the youth of America need to be at the forefront of the solution.” America’s Best Idea Grant Inspired by the critically acclaimed Ken Burns documentary The National Parks: America’s Best Idea, the America’s Best Idea grant program funds park projects designed to connect diverse, under-engaged populations throughout the United States with their national parks in innovative and meaningful ways. With these funds, CAVO created an outdoor classroom, greenhouse, and interactive student program to engage local and regional youth promoting stewardship, conservation, sense of place, and an understanding of both the National Park Service and the natural and cultural resources of the park. Parks Climate Challenge Grant The 2012 Parks Climate Challenge grant program uses national parks as classrooms to educate teachers and students about climate change. “Climate change is a profound problem and the youth of America need to be at the forefront of the solution,” said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation. “Parks Climate Challenge is just one of our programs that empowers our youth and strengthens our parks.” Now in its third year, the program first connects with teachers, giving them the tools to create engaging curriculum on the subject of climate change. The grant at CAVO gave 18 educators from four states the rare opportunity to work directly with USGS scientist Bruce Molnia, PhD., providing teachers the platform, information, and tools to develop hands-on service projects for their students incorporating national park experiences either within or outside the boundaries of a national park. Park Stewards Grant The Park Stewards grant program gives high school teachers and students the opportunity to explore the relevance of national parks to their lives, and encourages them to become civically engaged stewards of their national parks. The program places high school educators in national parks for immersive learning experiences during the summer months. As a result of their in-park experiences “These service-learning activities allow students to apply academic knowledge and critical thinking skills...” the teachers develop service-learning programs that are implemented by their students during the following school year. These service-learning activities allow students to apply academic knowledge and critical thinking skills (in addition to physical skills as appropriate) to address genuine needs of the park. Climate Challenge Grant Participants (from left front): Wendy Kendle (OK), Joe Curie (NM), Claudia Labeth (OK), Rick Peek (NM), Tonna Winford (CO), Ranger Lynn Cartmell, Suzanne Garcia (TX), Daniel Kendle (OK), Heidi Karr (NM), Christalina Donovan (NM), Michelle Brown (TX), Danny Kendle (OK), Keith Berry (CO), Gary Smith (OK), Jennifer Keeler (CO), Jason Allensworth (OK), Larry Arizmendez (TX), Chris Dobbins (OK), & Jeffrey Dilda (CO). The cial is newsletter CapulinLT Volcano Monument • labeled “Footer - date vol. no.”) • Issue number Volume 2, Issue This offi footer set in 8/10ofFrutiger Std 65 National Bold (or as the paragraph style goes here 2—Fall 2012 National Parks: Education for the Next Generation Since the creation of the National Park Service in 1916, visitors have been flocking to national parks to take in breathtaking scenery. Though our mission is to protect and preserve natural and cultural historical resources for future generations to enjoy, there is an unspoken responsibility in our mission. We cannot properly protect and preserve these resources without ensuring their safety by educating the next generation of park stewards. National parks throughout the nation offer educational and service-learning projects to academic institutions. Over the course of the last year, Capulin Volcano hosted 1,076 students and offered 29 curriculum-based programs to students. The majority of these programs were to schools from New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. The park was also used by several colleges for geologic and natural resource studies. Two different universities, Oklahoma State University and Southwestern Oklahoma State University, held classes in the park during the month of May. These courses helped students gain valuable experience in resource management. With the volunteer work contributed by both schools, Capulin Volcano’s Natural Resource Team was able to accomplish several important exotic plant management projects. Stu
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park News Newsletter The Capulin Title Chronicle Park to Host Youth with Assistance from Rocky Mountain Youth Corps Capulin Volcano National Monument is teaming up with Rocky Mountain Youth Corps (RMYC) for the summer 2012 to revitalize the park’s visitor resources. Two crews of eight corpsmembers each are slated for the work at Capulin. One group will focus on rehabilitating the Lava Flow Trail between the Visitor Center and picnic area. The other crew will work to “Rocky Mountain Youth Corps inspires young adults to make a difference in themselves and their communities.” remove invasive plant species and reinstate native grasses as well as address the park’s fire hazards by removing woody debris and downed fuel. The completion of these projects will meet the needs of more people by creating a safer, more accessible and educational experience for visitors of all ages. “This is one small step to take Capulin Volcano to a full service park,” stated park superintendent Peter Armato. According to the organization’s mission statement, “Rocky Mountain Youth Corps inspires young adults to make a difference in themselves and their communities. Through training and team service, Rocky Mountain Youth Corps is a stepping stone to new opportunities.” Last year, RMYC employed over 100 young people across the state of New Mexico. For many, this was their first job and first time going Rocky Mountain Youth Corps crew members hard at work on a trails project in the summer of 2011. through the interview process. RMYC interviews each applicant to ensure that he or she gets that real world experience they will need when they join the work force after graduating. rehabilitate areas recently affected by wildfires and renovate trails while others assisted with afterschool and healthcare programs. RMYC seeks applicants who are “willing to learn, take direction, and work with others as part of a team,” said Field Program Director Ben Thomas. They look to recruit a diverse group for each crew because, “there is strength in diversity,” Thomas said. “This is one small step to take Capulin Volcano to a full service park.” The tasks these crews take on must have a long-term impact, be educational in nature, and/or meet a high priority need. This leads to a wide range of possible projects. In 2011, some crews worked to RMYC will begin recruiting for the Capulin crews in May with work starting in June. Positions are open to New Mexico residents ages 16-25 years old. All those interested in applying should contact Ben Thomas. He can be reached by calling (575) 751-1420 ext. 27 or via e-mail at ben@youthcorps.org. The cial is newsletter ofFrutiger CapulinLT Volcano Monument • labeled “Footer - date vol. no.”) • IssueVolume Issue 1—Spring 2012 This offi footer set in 8/10 Std 65 National Bold (or as the paragraph style number2,goes here Teacher-Ranger-Teacher Selections Made for Summer 2012 Imagine spending your summer in the outdoors, surrounded by nature, given the rare chance to serve in the national park system. For many people, working for the National Park Service is the opportunity of a lifetime. This summer, four teachers will leave their classrooms to join the green and grey for 8 weeks. Teacher-rangers selected to work at Capulin Volcano National Monument this summer include Gary Smith from Tulsa, Oklahoma; Claudia Labeth from Wilson, Oklahoma; Kelly Jones from Des Moines, New Mexico; and Suzanne Garcia from Amarillo, Texas. The Teacher-Ranger-Teacher program at Capulin has been in place since 2008 and strives to connect teachers from diverse schools to national parks. Priority is given to teachers whose students have little access to national parks, are underrepresented, or economically marginalized. Time spent in a national park helps teacher-rangers provide kids with a national park experience in their own classrooms. This, in turn, Teacher-Ranger-Teacher Claudia Labeth swearing in Junior Rangers after an interpretive program at the volcano rim. helps foster a sense of appreciation for our national parks in today’s youth. This summer at Capulin, teacher-rangers will lead interpretive programs, assist researchers in the field, and shadow park employees—all while wearing the national park uniform. They will develop lesson plans focusing upon the unique resources found at Capulin which they can then take back to their classrooms helping students to connect from afar. They will also be aiding the park in launching a new program called Students Teaching About Monumental Park Sites Meet Virginia Tavarez, Maintenance Work Supervisor Recently, Capulin Volcano hired a new Maintenance Work Supervisor, Virginia Tavarez. Virginia oversees the Capulin maintenance staff and is in charge of everything from janitorial duties to building renovation. Armed with lots of energy and enthusiasm, Virginia has promised “to do whatever it takes to maintain the park facilities for visitor use

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