"Buffalo Springs, Chickasaw National Recreation Area, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Chickasaw

National Recreation Area - Oklahoma

Chickasaw National Recreation Area is situated in the foothills of the Arbuckle Mountains in south-central Oklahoma near Sulphur in Murray County. It includes the former Platt National Park and Arbuckle Recreation District. The area was established as Sulphur Springs Reservation on July 1, 1902; renamed and redesignated Platt National Park on June 29, 1906; combined with the Arbuckle Recreation Area and additional lands and renamed and redesignated on 17 March 1976. The park contains many fine examples of 1930's Civilian Conservation Corps architecture. CCC workers created pavilions, park buildings, and enclosures for the park's many natural springs.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area (NRA) in Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chickasaw - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area (NRA) in Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/chic/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chickasaw_National_Recreation_Area Chickasaw National Recreation Area is situated in the foothills of the Arbuckle Mountains in south-central Oklahoma near Sulphur in Murray County. It includes the former Platt National Park and Arbuckle Recreation District. The area was established as Sulphur Springs Reservation on July 1, 1902; renamed and redesignated Platt National Park on June 29, 1906; combined with the Arbuckle Recreation Area and additional lands and renamed and redesignated on 17 March 1976. The park contains many fine examples of 1930's Civilian Conservation Corps architecture. CCC workers created pavilions, park buildings, and enclosures for the park's many natural springs. Springs, streams, lakes - whatever its form, water is the attraction at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. From US I-35 drive through the towns of Davis and towards the town of Sulphur. There are a variety of destinations in the park to choose from. Travertine Nature Center A good starting place for visitors. It has brochures, exhibits, maps and helpful Rangers. Get information about lakes, camping, trails and special events. From I-35 drive through the towns of Davis and Sulphur to the intersection of State Highway 7 and 177. Drive south on Hwy. 177 and take the first left to the Travertine Nature Center. Buckhorn Campground Loop A Buckhorn Campground has four loops. Loop A is open seasonally on a first come, first served basis. There are no hookups for RVs on Loop A. Located next to Lake of the Arbuckles, Buckhorn Campground is also located near the Buckhorn Boat Launch and near the southern trailhead for the Rock Creek Multi-Use Trail. Buckhorn Non-Utility Sites 16.00 These site have no hookup. Water and restrooms are located nearby. Price is per night. Sites hold up to eight people. Buckhorn Campground Loop A map A map of Buckhorn Campground, Loop A, showing locations of campsites, restrooms, water, and more Loop A is first come, first served and is only open in summer months. Buckhorn Campground Loop B Buckhorn Campground has four loops. Loop B is open seasonally on a first come, first served basis. There are no hookups for RVs on Loop B. Located next to Lake of the Arbuckles, Buckhorn Campground is also located near the Buckhorn Boat Launch and near the southern trailhead for the Rock Creek Multi-Use Trail. Buckhorn Non-Utility Site 16.00 These sites have no electric hookups. Water is available at shared locations throughout the campground. Buckhorn Loop B Map A map of Buckhorn Loop B depicting the relative locations of the restrooms, campsites, and lakeshore Buckhorn Loop B Map Buckhorn Campground Loop C Buckhorn Campground has four loops. Loop C is open year round by reservation only. Located next to Lake of the Arbuckles, Buckhorn Campground is also located near the Buckhorn Boat Launch and near the southern trailhead for the Rock Creek Multi-Use Trail. Buckhorn Non-Utility Sites 16.00 These sites do not have electricity. Water is available at locations throughout the campground. Buckhorn Utility Sites 22.00 These sites have electric (30 amp) and water hookups for Rvs. Many also have 50 amp hookups. Detailed information for each site is available on recreation.gov Buckhorn Premium Utility Sites 24.00 These sites have electric (30 amp) and water hookups for RVs. Many also have 50 amp hookups. Find detailed information for each campsite at recreation.gov Buckhorn Loop C map A map of Buckhorn Loop C depicting the relative locations of the restrooms, campsites, and lakeshore Buckhorn Loop C Map Buckhorn Campground Loop D Buckhorn Campground has four loops. Loop D is open year round. Campsite on Loop D are first come, first served. Located next to Lake of the Arbuckles, Buckhorn Campground is also located near the Buckhorn Boat Launch and near the southern trailhead for the Rock Creek Multi-Use Trail. Buckhorn Non-Utility Site 16.00 These sites have no electricity. Water is available at locations throughout the campground. Buckhorn Utility Sites 22.00 These sites have electricity (30 amp) and water hookups for RVs. Many also have 50 amp hookups. Buckhorn Premium Utility Sites 24.00 These sites have electric (30 amp) and water hookups for RVs. Many also have 50 amp hookups. Buckhorn Loop D Map A map of Buckhorn Loop D depicting the relative locations of the restrooms, campsites, and lakeshore Buckhorn Loop D Map Central Campground Central Campground consists of ten group sites. It is located near downtown Sulphur. Central Campground Group Sites 30.00 Each group site holds up to 30 people and must be booked via recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Restrooms and water are located nearby. Fees are per night. Central Campground Sign A brown entrance sign for Central Campground, stating that reservations are required. Central Campground sites are available by reservation only Central Campground Site 68 A grassy area with a a picnic table and a fire ring. A stone building is in the background. A typical campsite at Central Campground, with the restroom building in the distance. Central Campground map A map of Central Campground showing locations of campsites, restrooms, water, and more. Central Campground consists of ten group campsites. open only for the summer season. Cold Springs Campground Cold Springs Campground is open seasonally for the summer. It opens no later than Memorial Day Weekend and closes no earlier than Labor Day Weekend. Rebuilt in the 1930s to its current configuration, it does not accommodate most RVs, though small pop-up or teardrop trailers may fit in the parking spaces at some campsites. Cold Springs Campground Regular Sites 14.00 Site fees are per night. Each site can accomodate up to eight people. Cold Springs Group Sites 30.00 Each group site holds up to 30 people. Fee is per night. Cold Springs Campground Map A map of Cold Springs Campground showing locations of campsites, restrooms, water, and more. Cold Springs Campground is open for the summer season only. Most sites are first-come, first served. Groups sites are by reservation only. Guy Sandy Campground Guy Sandy Campground is open seasonally for the summer. It opens no later than Memorial Day Weekend and closes no earlier than Labor Day Weekend. It is located on the western shore of Lake of the Arbuckles. This primitive campground offers basic amenities only. RVs are permitted, but no hookups are available. Communal water spigots and pit toilets are available. Each campsite has a picnic table and fire ring with a grill. Guy Sandy Campsite Fee 14.00 cash only Guy Sandy sign A park entrance sign for the Guy Sandy area at Chickasaw National Recreation Area Entrance sign for Guy Sandy Rock Creek Campground Located along Rock Creek and near Veterans Lake, this wooded campground is open year round, though some sites within it close seasonally. Built with small travel trailers in mind, this campground is good for primitive camping. No hook ups are available. Rock Creek Campground Standard Sites 14.00 First come, first served sites can only be booked in person at the fee machine in the campground. Check out is 2pm. Check in is 2:30pm. Sites hold up to eight people each. Fee is per night. Restrooms and water are available nearby. Rock Creek Campground Group Site 30.00 Group site holds up to 30 people. Fee is per night. Site must be reserved at recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Restrooms and water located nearby. Rock Creek Campground sign A large, old style wood sign with white lettering states "Rock Creek Campground Entrance" Rock Creek Campground Entrance Sign Rock Creek Campground site 55 An empty campsite in the woods with a picnic table and a fire ring next to an asphalt road. A typical campsite at Rock Creek Campground Rock Creek Campground Map A map of Rock Creek Campground showing the relative location of campsites, restrooms, water and more The lower numbered sites are open year-round, while the higher numbered sites will only be opened up when demand is high. The Point Campground The Point Campground is open year round. It has a combination of sites with and without RV hook-ups. The Upper Loop is available by reservation only. The Lower Loop is first come, first served. Located near the shor of Lake of the Arbuckles and The Point Boat Launch. The Point Standard Sites 16.00 These site have no hookups. Water and restrooms are located nearby. The Point Utility Sites 22.00 These sites are designed for smaller RVs. You are not required to have an RV to stay in these sites, but you must pay the full rate. They have water hookups and both 30 and 50 amp service. A dump station is located near the campground entrance. The Point Premium Utility Sites 24.00 These sites are designed for larger RVs. You are not required to have an RV to stay in these sites, but you must pay the full rate. They have water hookups and both 30 and 50 amp service. A dump station is located near the campground entrance. The Point Site 17 An empty campsite with a picnic table and a fire ring with trees surrounding it. A walk-in site at The Point (no RV hook-ups) The Point site 52 An empty campsite with a long driveway and electric and water hook-ups for an RV. Some sites at The Point have water and electric hook-ups for RVs. The Point Campground map A map of The Point Campground showing locations of campsites, water, restrooms, and more. The Point Campground is open year-round. Sites in the upper loop are by reservation only. Sites in the lower loop are first-come, first-served. Lincoln Bridge Lincoln Bridge with Travertine Creek flowing below Lincoln Bridge stands out as one of the oldest park structures Lake of the Arbuckles Lake boating on a summer day Lake of the Arbuckles attracts many boaters each summer for various recreational activities Family Fishing Fun Lake fishing with family Learning to Fish at Veterns Lake Park Bison Herd of bison The park has a herd of bison which are very popular Hiking to Buffalo Springs Two people hiking over a water feature Two people walk towards Buffalo Springs, one of the park's many fresh water springs Multiple Benefits of Prescribed Burning at Chickasaw National Recreation Area Chickasaw NRA has conducted a series of prescribed burns to help remove previously thinned eastern red cedar. This tree creates a wildfire hazard, takes over native tallgrass prairie, impairs local air quality by producing allergens, and can draw down the water table. Under natural conditions eastern red cedar is limited by periodic natural fires. The work helps meet the NPS goals of maintaining and restoring landscapes and creating fire-adapted human communities. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma Chickasaw National Recreation Area (NRA) preserves historic freshwater and mineral springs within a landscape of gently rolling hills and stream-cut ravines that are the erosional remnants of the Arkbuckle Mountains in Oklahoma. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. small waterfall Central Campground Cultural Landscape The 15-acre Central Campground is the smallest of the three campground developments within the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. Features of the campground include Travertine Creek, which winds through the landscape, as does the Perimeter Road of the park. Panther Falls is also located nearby. The area is used for camping and associated recreational activities, including bathing in Travertine Creek. Camping at Central Camp, circa 1933 (Central Campground: CLI, NPS, 2007) Streams Monitoring in the Sonoran Desert and Southern Plains Because of their importance, streams were chosen as a focus for monitoring in the National Park Service (NPS) Sonoran Desert and Southern Plains inventory and monitoring networks. Portions of several major river systems (or their tributaries) are found within many parks of both networks. Monitoring water quality from a boat Chickasaw Breeding Bird Inventory Prior to 2003, no formal or comprehensive inventory had been conducted for birds at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. However, the Oklahoma Natural Heritage Inventory conducted such an inventory in May-August 2003. Northern cardinal Exotic Plants Monitoring in the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert National parks, like other publicly managed lands, are deluged by new exotic species arriving through predictable (e.g., road, trail, and riparian corridors), sudden (e.g., long distance dispersal through cargo containers and air freight), and unexpected anthropogenic pathways (e.g., weed seeds mixed in with restoration planting mixes). Landscape with a uniform, green foreground consisting of invasive kochia Perimeter Road Cultural Landscape The Perimeter Road is significant for its relationship to the former Platt National Park (a National Historic Landmark District). Prior to 1933, the road system consisted of an east-west route crossed by a north-south route with a few spurs located off these main roads. This was drastically changed during the 1930s, when the Civilian Conservation Corps constructed a perimeter loop road encompassing the entire park. Section of Perimeter Road (K. Ruhnke, NPS) Little Niagara Falls/Travertine Island Cultural Landscape The Little Niagara Falls and Travertine Island area is located in the northeastern portion of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. The landscape features exhibit classic “rustic” style design characteristics. The buildings and landscape features constructed by the CCC are made of local stone and wood, emphasize the horizontal lines of the landscape, and merge with their surroundings. Little Niagara Falls (Cultural Landscapes Program, NPS, 2016) Pavilion Springs, Hillside Spring, HQ/Maint. Area Cultural Landscape The 48-acre Pavilion Springs, Hillside Springs, Headquarters, and Maintenance Area landscape is located in the central portion of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. The buildings of the Maintenance Area and the two spring complexes are both excellent examples of the CCC-era landscape design projects undertaken in Platt National Park. In addition, the Administration building reflects earlier park usage and early settlement of the area. Hillside Springs (Cultural Landscapes Program, NPS, 2016) Antelope and Buffalo Springs Cultural Landscape Antelope and Buffalo Springs are part of a historic, designed landscape located on the far eastern portion of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. The area is primarily used for passive recreation such as hiking, walking, and nature study. The creation of the Nature Center building and its site in the 1960s is significant for its association with Mission 66, a nationwide National Park Service effort to modernize its facilities. Antelope and Buffalo Springs (K. Ruhnke, NPS) Cold Springs Campground Cultural Landscape Cold Springs Campground is located in the central eastern section of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. It explicitly reflects the NPS principles of Rustic design and construction, in both overall layout and design. Particularly notable is the rustic design of the checking station, which is made of local stone and wood to blend into its surroundings in color, scale, and appearance. Comfort station (Cultural Landscapes Program, NPS, 2016) Walnut Grove Cultural Landscape Walnut Grove is located in the western half of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. Historically, the area was the site of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp 808 from 1934 to 1940. The area is significant for embodying the characteristics of the type, period, and methods of construction typical of the “Rustic style” of park design developed by the National Park Service between 1916-1942. Walnut Grove (NPS) Buffalo Pasture/Prairie Uplands Cultural Landscape The 392-acre Buffalo Pasture and Prairie Uplands landscape is located in the central portion of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. In general, the area is primarily a natural landscape, with few visitor facilities. Today, the area is still important as a repository of early park history, as exemplified by the buffalo herd, which has been a feature in the park since 1920. Grazing bison herd (NPS) Rock Creek Campground Cultural Landscape The Rock Creek Campground was designed in the 1940s and constructed in 1951. Of the 106 campsites in the campground, about half of these (57) were constructed according to the original (1943) design layout. Rock Creek Campground is unique as an early example of pull-through campsites, a design change implemented to accommodate new, larger camping vehicles such as RVs. Rock Creek Campground sign (Rock Creek Campground: CLI, NPS, 2007) Flower Park and Black Sulphur Springs Cultural Landscape The 35-acre Flower Park and Black Sulphur Springs landscape is located in the north central, western half of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. The Black Sulphur Springs area, with its crescent shaped, lake-like beach, has maintained its historic primary use as a place for sunbathing, wading, swimming and picnicking. The focal point of this area is a pre-CCC era, Neo-classically styled pavilion. Flower Park Stream (Cultural Landscapes Program, NPS, 2016) Bromide Springs/Bromide Hill Cultural Landscape The 59-acre Bromide Springs and Bromide Hill landscape is located in the western edge of the Platt National Park National Historic Landmark District. In addition to the springs, the landscape contains a large picnic area and entry landscape located on a flat terrace to the north of Rock Creek. Formerly used as a campground and gathering area, the area south of Rock Creek is a park-like landscape of grass and canopy trees, used primarily for picnicking. Bromide Pavilion (NPS) Climate Change in the Southern Plains Network Climate change may have direct and/or indirect effects on many elements of Southern Plains network ecosystems, from streams and grasslands to fires and birds. Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) is an invasive plant that has invaded the Southern Plains Southwestern Plains The Plains of the Southwest include the southern Great Plains, the High Plains, Llano Estacado (Staked Plains), and Edwards Plateau. Sunset lights up the grass at Capulin Volcano National Monument Series: Cultural Landscapes of Chickasaw National Recreation Area The park has been part of the National Park Service since 1916, first as Platt National Park and then Chickasaw National Recreational Area. Long valued for its springs and water features, the area has been popular for camping and picnicking for over a century. Many of the landscape features are associated with NPS park development. A Rustic style comfort station is made of heavy stone and wood construction. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Southern Plains Bird Inventories Birds are a highly visible component of many ecosystems and because they respond quickly to changes in resource conditions, birds are good indicators of environmental change. Bird inventories allow us to understand the current condition, or status, of bird populations and communities in parks. These data are important for managing birds and other resources and provide baseline information for monitoring changes over time. Violet-green swallow Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Silurian Period—443.8 to 419.2 MYA Excellent exposures and well-preserved fossils in Silurian rocks of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve provide clues to the timing of the assembly of Alaska’s assembly from a variety of continental fragments. fossil corals in a rock matrix Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Connie Rudd: Defining a Career Path Connie Rudd's career with the National Park Service began as a seasonal ranger in 1979. Her continual desire to learn propelled her to various sites and positions in interpretation, planning, and management until 2014, when she retired as Park Superintendent. In this Spotlight article, Rudd reflects on her career path, changes in interpretation, and being in upper management as a woman. Part of "Women’s Voices: Women in the National Park Service Oral History Project." Connie Rudd smiles for a portrait in an outdoor setting, wearing a NPS uniform and flathat Women Who Were There No comprehensive data has been compiled about women government employees working in national parks before the NPS was founded on August 25, 1916. Their numbers are undoubtedly few but perhaps not as small as we might imagine. The four early NPS women featured here were exceptional in their own ways, but they are also proxies for the names we no longer remember and the stories we can no longer tell. Una Lee Roberts, 1933.(Courtesy of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, Gaylord-Pickens Museum)
Chickasaw National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Chickasaw National Recreation Area The Civilian Conservation Corps Visitors to the Platt Historic District find a remarkable and inviting landscape of swimming holes, winding trails and roads, campgrounds, and rustic stone buildings that provide a quiet, intimate place to relax and explore the natural environment. These features reflect the hard work of young men whose lives were changed by an organization that lasted only nine years but left an indelible mark on the landscape of the United States. These “Men Who Built the Parks” left a legacy in parks and forests across the country, and decades later, millions of people still enjoy their work. A Troubled Economy Many people who had enjoyed the prosperity of the Roaring Twenties found themselves in soup lines and tattered clothes by the early 1930s. Sputtering Model Ts rumbled down dusty roads, carrying passengers and their few possessions toward dreams of a better tomorrow. The growing depression devastated the nation’s economy and left many in dire straits. By 1933, nearly ten thousand banks had failed and more than 16 million Americans were unemployed. Fifteen percent fewer children were born in 1933 than in 1929; a reflection of severely diminished expectations. Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) was elected president by a landslide in 1932 with his promise of a “New Deal” for the American people. Within days of his inauguration, FDR called Congress into special session to work on emergency legislation to aid the economy and the American people. Many new agencies and programs were created to provide relief and restore the economy. President Roosevelt kept his promise and the New Deal was born. Roosevelt’s “Tree Army” Probably the most popular New Deal program was the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Designed to reduce unemployment while also conserving natural resources, the CCC affected the lives of millions of Americans, and transformed the American landscape. Nicknamed “Roosevelt’s Tree Army,” the CCC was operated through the cooperative efforts of four departments. The Department of Labor oversaw the selection of enrollees, the Army ran the camps, and the Interior and Agriculture departments provided work projects. The work of the CCC initially focused on reforestation, but quickly evolved to include soil conservation and development of recreational park facilities. Initially, unmarried men between the ages of 18 and 25 whose families were on relief could apply. They enrolled for six months, with an option to reenlist for up to two years. Enrollees earned $30 a month, $25 of which was sent to their families. Eventually, “Local Experienced Men” and World War I veterans were allowed to enroll. African-Americans and American Indians also participated, generally in segregated CCC companies. From 1906 until 1976 the present-day Platt Historic District was known as Platt National Park. Established as Sulphur Springs Reservation in 1902 to protect mineral springs and water resources, the site evolved from a settlement and town site into a national park. This evolution required almost equal amounts of obliteration and construction of buildings, roads, and other features. The small size and humble resources of Platt National Park were somewhat atypical, when compared to the great landscape parks with their sublime scenery and monumental hotels. Yet visitors didn’t seem to notice; in 1914, Platt’s visitation exceeded that of both Yellowstone and Yosemite and was second only to the Hot Springs Reservation in Arkansas. The early appearance of Platt National Park was not what we imagine today when we think of national parks. Early park features included not only mineral springs, but flower beds, animal pens and a golf course. Because of its limited size and the unusually large number of visitors, portions of Platt were heavily impacted by camping, cars, and people. Balancing visitor needs while protecting park resources was a constant struggle in the early years of Platt National Park. The programs and federal dollars of the New Deal were seen as “a golden opportunity” by park staff. Company 808’s “Sapling Crew” A New Deal for Platt National Park Camp and Community Men of the 808 Improving Nature The community of Sulphur had some apprehension about a CCC camp, concerned over the possible presence of unruly young men. This attitude swiftly changed as the camp was established and work began. The city demonstrated their appreciation in 1935, by donating thirty gallons of paint to improve the appearance of the camp buildings. Enrollee Earl Pollard remembered, “Sulphur used to be a lively place. Very lively. The camp didn’t have any air conditioning, and we’d open the windows and doors at night, and the music from the honky tonk would put us to sleep every night.” Camp facilities included a headquarters building, day room, and a little canteen where enrollees could buy cigarettes, gum, and candy;
Chickasaw National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Chickasaw National Recreation Area The Lincoln Bridge Each day, hundreds of visitors pass through the park on highway 177; unnoticed by most of them, and hidden in the trees lining the banks of Travertine Creek is the Lincoln Bridge. Constructed in 1909, this stone bridge connects the Flower Park area and the city of Sulphur to the mineral springs south of Travertine Creek. The bridge is the first and oldest developed structure built in the park. For over one hundred years the Lincoln Bridge has been a park landmark and a treasured part of the landscape, bridging not only the creek, but the park’s past, present, and future. Turning a town into a park From 1906 until 1976, the present-day Platt Historic District was known as Platt National Park. Established as the Sulphur Springs Reservation in 1902 to protect mineral springs and water resources, the park evolved from a settlement and town site into a national park. Prior to the establishment of the park, the community of Sulphur was located around the mineral springs; following the park’s creation the town was forced to relocate to the north. This development required almost equal amounts of obliteration and construction of buildings, roads, and other features. The new town was connected to the springs in the new park by rickety wooden bridges and muddy fords. As additional visitors flocked to the mineral springs of Platt National Park, it soon became clear that a new way was needed to move people across Rock Creek and Travertine Creek to the site of Pavilion Springs. In the fall of 1908 Park Superintendent Albert Greene received permission from the Secretary of the Interior to solicit bids for a new foot bridge across Travertine Creek. It Will “Doubtless Stand for Ages” Superintendent Greene awarded the task of constructing the bridge in the end of November 1908 to the firm of Liberenz & Robinson. Work began immediately on the rock arch Gothic Revival structure and was nearly complete by the end of January 1909. Construction of the bridge was finished on February 11, 1909 and formally dedicated the next day. The Lincoln Bridge was the first permanent improvement in the park. The arch, capable of sustaining any weight, spanning the stream; the four turrets at the corners, with battlement summits, surmounted with metal flag-staffs; the eight electric lights along the parapets; the rugged construction of the stone work, without mark of hammer or stroke of trowel to embellish; the paved roadway leading on the one hand to a great highway congested with travel, and on the other by sodded slopes to shady retreats along the noisy brook, unite to form, in symmetrical proportions, a feature of utility and beauty that shall be an object lesson of the stability and dignity of the general government, forever stimulating patriotism and a pride of country. It is not a thing apart - it is as if it had grown there and been made when the rugged banks of the stream and the trees were made. Predicting that the bridge, “will doubtless stand for ages,” Superintendent Greene eloquently described the newly completed bridge in his monthly report to the Secretary of the Interior: Postcard image of the Lincoln Bridge, shortly after completion, 1909. As this is the first permanent improvement in the park, I may be permitted to refer briefly to its most prominent and picturesque features. E X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C A™ Dedicating a Park Landmark Postcard image of the Lincoln Bridge, circa 1920. Lincoln’s Legacy The dedication of the Lincoln Bridge took place on February 12, 1909, the centennial of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln. The ceremony was conducted with much fanfare. In a report to the Secretary of the Interior, Superintendent Greene reported: On February 12, 1909, the opening of the bridge was celebrated by a concourse of the citizens of Su1phur and visitors to the Park. The exercises consisted of the singing of patriotic airs, reading of Lincoln’s Gettysburg oration...addresses by Mayor Kendall for the Confederate veterans; In 1909, Sulphur, Oklahoma, and the new park honored President Abraham Lincoln’s contributions to our nation by naming the new bridge the “Lincoln Bridge.” Sulphur was not unique. Communities across the country remembered Lincoln’s contributions in 1909 and in the years since. Lincoln’s legacy can be found almost anywhere. He is remembered in music, poetry, sculpture. We see his face every day on coins and currency. Towns, roads, and schools bear his name. Rev. Clark on the life and times of Lincoln; and the Superintendent on personal reminiscences of Lincoln as a neighbor and friend...Mrs. Lucy M. Bennett wearing a dress of materials bought of Lincoln when a storekeeper in Salem, and patterned after the style of that period, climbed to the top of a turret and broke a wine bottle of medicinal water from the wall, christening the structure, “THE LINCOLN BRIDGE”. The
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Chickasaw National Recreation Area Hunting Map and Regulations We hope you have a safe and successful hunting season. A variety of game including quail, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, dove, ducks, geese, and deer may be found here. However, due to the small size of the area and heavy hunting pressure, success is limited. Trapping is prohibited. Hunting Regulations The current Oklahoma Hunting Regulations provides state hunting information and may provide special regulations for Chickasaw National Recreation Area Most state hunting regulations are applicable in Chickasaw National Recreation Area with the following exceptions or items of special emphasis, • The use of artificial light to view wildlife is prohibited. • Baiting of wildlife is prohibited. • Feral hogs may be taken year round in compliance with state regulations. • Damage to trees such as cutting limbs and using nails or screws is prohibited. • All tree stands must be portable. Tree stands unattended for more than 36 hours are considered to be abandoned property and subject to removal by the National Park Service. • Hunters must have a valid Oklahoma hunting license. Hunting licenses, special tags and waterfowl stamps are available from local businesses. • Displaying wildlife carcasses or remains is prohibited in campgrounds and developed areas. Firearms A new federal law allows people who can legally possess firearms under applicable federal, state, and local laws to legally possess firearms in the park. Federal regulations prohibit the discharge of firearms within the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, except in the lawful taking of game animals. All sighting in and target practice must be done before entering the recreation area, since there is no designated target practice area. Fully automatic weapons and prohibited. Federal law continues to prohibit the possession of firearms in designated ‘‘federal facilities’’ in national parks, for example, nature/visitor centers, offices, ranger stations or maintenance facilities/building, these places are marked with Firearms Prohibited signs. Boundaries Chickasaw National Recreation Area is surrounded by private lands. State law requires that permission of the landowner or the custodian he obtained before entry on public lands. Therefore, it is important that hunters he familiar with the recreation area boundaries. Not all of the recreation area is open to hunting. All developed areas are closed and some areas are restricted to archery and shot shells only. The color-coded map found on the other side of this brochure indicates which areas are closed or restricted. Camping and Vehicles Off-road travel is not permitted in the recreation area. Camping is available throughout the year in designated campsites. All vehicles are restricted to established roads. Safety Tips • • • • • • • • Never point a gun at anything you do not want to shoot. Treat every gun with respect due to a loaded gun. Always be sure that the barrel and action are clear of obstruction. Carry your gun so that you can control the direction of the muzzle. Keep safety on until you are ready to shoot. Never climb a tree, fence, or other obstacle with a loaded gun. Never shoot at a flat, hard surface, or the surface of the water. Unattended guns should be unloaded. In Case of Emergency Park personnel are on duty to make your visit safe and enjoyable. In case of an emergency, call 911. For ranger assistance call 580-622-2000. Chickasaw National Recreation Area Sulphur, OK EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior

also available

National Parks
USFS NW