"A View From Massai Point" by NPS Photo / Katy Hooper , public domain

Chiricahua

National Monument - Arizona

Chiricahua National Monument is a unit of the National Park System located in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The monument was established on April 18, 1924, to protect its extensive hoodoos and balancing rocks.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Chiricahua National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chiricahua - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Chiricahua National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Douglas Ranger District in Coronado National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Coronado MVUM - Douglas 2015

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Douglas Ranger District in Coronado National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Cochise County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Cochise County

Cochise County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/chir/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiricahua_National_Monument Chiricahua National Monument is a unit of the National Park System located in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The monument was established on April 18, 1924, to protect its extensive hoodoos and balancing rocks. A "Wonderland of Rocks" is waiting for you to explore at Chiricahua National Monument. The 8-mile paved scenic drive and 17-miles of day-use hiking trails provide opportunities to discover the beauty, natural sounds, and inhabitants of this 12,025 acre site. Visit the Faraway Ranch Historic District to discover more about the people who have called this area home. Chiricahua National Monument is located 120 miles southeast of Tucson. Take I-10 east from Tucson to the first exit for Willcox. Travel 3 miles into town to the stoplight and turn right. You will follow Arizona State Highway 186 for 32 miles to the junction of Arizona State Highway 181. Turn left and 4 miles later you will be at the Chiricahua entrance station. Maximum vehicle length is 29 feet to drive beyond the visitor center. A hiking shuttle is available daily at 9 am from the visitor center. Chiricahua National Monument Visitor Center The visitor center is open from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Mountain Standard Time. Exhibits about the geology, natural history, archaeology and cultural history are housed in the visitor center, build by CCC stone masons in the late 1930s. A short video about the park is available as well. A bookstore offers a wide range of titles on topics ranging from Apache history to children's books about the regional flora and fauna. Chiricahua National Monument is located 120 miles southeast of Tucson. Take I-10 east from Tucson to the first exit for Willcox. Travel 3 miles into town to the stoplight and turn right. You will follow Arizona State Highway 186 for 32 miles to the junction of Arizona State Highway 181. Turn left and 4 miles later you will be at the Chiricahua entrance station. Bonita Canyon Campground Bonita Canyon Campground is located in a shady pine and oak grove near the riparian area of Bonita Canyon wash. It has 25 sites and with rest rooms (flush toilets), running water, picnic tables, and trash pickup. There is a group campground that can accommodate 9 to 24 people (8 tent max). Reserve campsites through Recreation.gov There are no hookups or showers. Vehicle length limit is 29 feet. Camping is limited to 14 days. Standard, non-electric campsite 20.00 Site Access: Drive-In Checkin Time: 12:00 pm Checkout Time: 11:00 am Type of Use: Overnight Min Num of People: 1 Max Num of People: 8 Pets Allowed: Domestic Max Num of Vehicles: 2 Driveway Grade: Slight Driveway Surface: Gravel Driveway Entry: Back-In Driveway Length: 24 Max Vehicle Length: 24 Shade: Partial Tent Pad Length: 12 Tent Pad Width: 12 Tent Pad: Y BBQ: Y Food Locker: Y Location Rating: Prime Picnic Table: Y Quiet Area: Y Group Campsite 20.00 Site Access: Drive-In Checkin Time: 12:00 pm Checkout Time: 11:00 am Type of Use: Overnight Min Num of People: 9 Max Num of People: 24 Pets Allowed: Domestic Max Num of Vehicles: 5 Driveway Grade: Slight Driveway Surface: Gravel Driveway Entry: Back-In Driveway Length: 40 Max Vehicle Length: 29 Shade: Partial Tent Pad Length: 12 Tent Pad Width: 12 Double Driveway: Y Tent Pad: Y BBQ: Y Campfire Allowed: Y Fire Pit: Y Food Locker: Y Location Rating: Prime Picnic Table: Y Quiet Area: Y Bonita Canyon Campground Tents set up under pine trees The shady pines in the campground cooler temperatures in the summer and protection for wind and the elements View from Massai Point Many rock pinnacles with a valley and mountain range in background Massai Point offers excellent views of the standing rocks at Chiricahua Faraway Ranch A ranch house in a green field surrounds by low mountains Faraway Ranch preserves the heritage of early European settlers in the Chiricahua Mountains Echo Canyon Grotto Children climb through rock archways The standing rocks at Chiricahua create natural nooks and crannies ready to be explored Bonita Canyon A narrow road winds between tall oaks and rock cliffs Bonita Canyon Scenic Drive winds through standing rocks and rhyolite cliffs, climbing to Massai Point at 6900 ft / 2100 m. Big Balanced Rock Large rock balanced on a small point Big Balanced Rock It’s Alive! Biological Soil Crusts of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts It might come as a surprise to learn that in the sublime expanses of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts, some of the most interesting life around can be found in the dirt right in front of your feet! Biological soil crusts form a living groundcover that is the foundation of desert plant life. Soil crust at White Sands National Monument Park Air Profiles - Chiricahua National Monument Air quality profile for Chiricahua National Monument. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Chiricahua NM as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Chiricahua NM. Sunset from Massai Point Arizona Homestead The story of Faraway Ranch begins with the arrival of Emma Peterson, an immigrant from Sweden, in the United States. Unlike many immigrants, Emma Peterson’s family was well-off, owned a comfortable home, and employed several servants. Emma did not get along well with her step-mother, however, and decided to follow her brother and sister, who already had emigrated to the United States. Emma Peterson Erickson NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. landscape with hoodoos Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils in the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert Networks Vegetation and soils are two of many natural resources monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Learning about vegetation dynamics helps us to better understand the integrity of ecological processes, productivity trends, and ecosystem interactions that can otherwise be difficult to monitor. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor vegetation and soils using the scientific protocol described here. Quadrat used for biological soil crust sampling Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Civilian Conservation Corps at Tumacácori The CCC is one of the most well-remembered and highly regarded programs of the New Deal. Camp NM-1-N, located at Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico, made important contributions to Tumacácori’s visitor center. men with truck and olive tree in courtyard garden Veterans Help Restore and Maintain Resilient Landscape at Chiricahua National Monument In October 2018, an Arizona Conservation Corps Veterans Fire Crew (VFC 348) helped restore and maintain a resilient landscape at Chiricahua National Monument by reducing the buildup of vegetation. Veteran Fire Crew Native Peoples of the Sonoran Desert: The Nde The Apache (Inde) people came from as far north as Canada. They split into groups and settled across the American southwest. Although frequently cast as villains due to their historically antagonistic relationship with Spanish and American settlements, Apache people have a rich and varied cultural tradition. four dancers, painted white, with black face-coverings, dance in front of a crowd Historic Designed Landscape The Historic Designed Landscape within Chiricahua National Monument is primarily a rustic landscape that was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. The buildings themselves are strong statements of the ‘Government Rustic’ style of architecture used in units of the National Park Service. Without the availability of CCC labor, Chiricahua National Monument would have likely remained substantially undeveloped. Chiricahua National Monument (NPS) The Faraway Ranch Landscape & Current Preservation Projects Historians often have depicted the tourism industry in the West as superseding productive relationships with the land. As the economy changed in the twentieth century, many communities that had started off in the mining, logging, or ranching industry looked to tourism as a way to survive. The Faraway Ranch complicates notions of the relationship between tourism and the environment. Modern photo of the corral at Faraway Ranch Introduction In 1957 a journalist from the Saturday Evening Post stayed at the Faraway Ranch for several days, curious about the stories of a blind woman, Lillian Riggs, who managed the ranch. In the subsequent article, he wrote admiringly of the “Lady Boss” of Faraway: “Lillian was certainly a unique person. And she ran that ranch, make no mistake about it, and she knew what was going on at all times.” Portrait of the Erickson family The Guest Ranch Business Like her mother, Lillian did not sit at home waiting to be married. With her siblings, she attended school in Galesburg, Illinois and in 1906 started teaching at local schools. Lillian returned to the area and began teaching again, but when Hildegard started boarding guests at the ranch on weekends that same year, Lillian quit teaching and started helping her sister. Six Faraway Ranch guests on horseback Chiricahua National Monument Guests at Faraway also enjoyed excursions into the area that Lillian called a “Wonderland of Rocks.” Here, spires and pinnacles of rock clustered together, forming fantastic geologic formations. Two visitors pose by a sign for Faraway Ranch advertising horseback rides to see Chiricahua NM Perseverance In the Postwar Era By the mid-1940s, Ed and Lillian started to consider leaving the business. Both were growing older, and Lillian, who had been steadily losing her hearing also lost her eyesight. Lillian Erickson Riggs standing between a dog and a horse at Faraway Ranch Conclusion & References Faraway Ranch would not have existed without the actions of the women in the Erickson family. By preserving their story, Faraway Ranch helps to tell the full history of women in the West. Aerial view of Faraway Ranch buildings at the base of a steep hillside Faraway During the Depression The late 1920s were some of the most successful years for the Faraway Ranch. The dude ranch industry in general was prospering, particularly in Arizona. Portrait of Ed Riggs in a shirt and tie, and wearing a brimmed hat Southern Basin and Range The Southern Basin and Range is an extension of the Basin and Range Province centered on Nevada and the Great Basin and extending from southern Oregon to western Texas, and into northwest Mexico. Mountains and Desert in Guadalupe Mountains National Park Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Tortillas de harina (Flour Tortillas) What exactly are tortillas? How big are they? Of what are they made? How should they be made? These are questions that can spark much discussion and debate, even among tortilla makers themselves. The important thing is that none of this really matters - they are good, as you will be able to assert for yourself when you eat one made fresh by a Tumacácori demonstrator or in your own kitchen. Tortilla demonstrator in front of Tumacácori mission church Sky Island Fire Ecology A history of three major fire regimes which have shaped the current landscape and vegetation of Chiricahua National Monument, as well as other sky island sites in the southwest. Fire in grass below a tree. National Park Getaway: Chiricahua National Monument Rocks. It’s all about the rocks here at Chiricahua National Monument! Come explore the “Wonderland of Rocks” in Arizona, learn the stories of the people who called this place home, and have the one-of-a-kind experience of being on a Sky Island.  Overview of numerous pinnacle geological formations in a desert Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: The New Deal at Tumacácori The grounds of Tumacácori protect a map of treasures made by men and women during the New Deal era of the 1930's. Will you find them all? black and white photo of young men and truck in walled courtyard garden Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Series: The Story of Faraway Ranch Lillian, her sister Hildegard, and her mother, Emma Erickson, all played a vital role in the creation and management of Faraway Ranch. Emma initiated the purchase of the original cabin and property. Hildegard started the guest ranching business, and Lillian oversaw the expansion of the business with her husband, Ed Riggs, and continued to manage the ranch by herself after her husband’s death. Faraway Ranch thus preserves an important, non-traditional narrative of women's lives in the West. Two visitors pose by a sign for Faraway Ranch advertising horseback rides to Chiricahua NM Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Series: Native Peoples of the Sonoran Desert Who were the original inhabitants of the Sonoran desert and how did they adapt to the world-changing arrival of Spanish colonists? folklórico dancers with a series of different flags including Arizona and Tohono O'odham The Heliograph: 2020 Edition The Heliograph is the official newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue features stories on how we adapted our operations to minimize field work lost to the covid-19 pandemic, vegetation mapping at Saguaro NP, and communication improvements and opportunities for network parks. We also probe the minds of our interns and celebrate a high honor for our program manager. heliograph The Heliograph: Summer 2021 The Heliograph is the official newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue shares predictive tools and planning processes that can help park managers make proactive decisions in the face of climate change. We also explore some explanations for this spring's highly unusual saguaro bloom, celebrate our staff members, and provide updates on our monitoring projects. heliograph Climate and Water Monitoring at Chiricahua National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, and Fort Bowie National Historic Site In the national parks of Southeast Arizona, desert plants, wildlife, and visitors all depend on reliable water sources. The Sonoran Desert Network monitors climate, springs, and streams at Chiricahua National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, and Fort Bowie National Historic Site. Understanding changes in these closely linked factors helps managers make informed decisions affecting natural resources. Learn about our recent findings. Green moss grows next to water flowing down a rock face Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Elise Dillingham Read about how Elise went from training to become a flight nurse for the US Air Force to engaging youth citizen scientists in Southwestern parks. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a young woman in the field. text reads: Elise Dillingham, biologist Volcanic Inverted Topography Inverted topography arises when lava flows that filled valleys at the time of their eruption later hold up mesas because their resistance to erosion is greater than most other rock types. photo of volcanic rock with petroglyphs and a distant mesa Older Caldera Complexes The presence of voluminous ash-flow tuffs are one of the main markers for the presence of older caldera complexes. Subsequent erosion and/or volcanic activity can make their caldera walls hard to find. Most of the older caldera complexes in or near national park sites are very large and were of the resurgent type. photo of hillside with layered rock outcrops Calderas Calderas are large collapse features that can be many miles in diameter. They form during especially large eruptions when the magma chamber is partially emptied, and the ground above it collapses into the momentary void. Crater Lake and Aniakchak Crater are calderas. photo of oblique aerial view of a volcanic caldera with snow and ice Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Explosive Calderas Explosive calderas result from violent eruptions of great quantities of silicic magmas. These eruptions produce massive eruption columns that extend into the stratosphere, and voluminous pyroclastic flows. Eruptions that produce explosive calderas generally range from 6 (Colossal) on the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) to 8 super eruptions (Apocalyptic). digital oblique aerial image of a volcanic caldera

nearby stays

Booking.com

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming
Yellowstone