"Cushwa Basin and Cushwa Brick and Coal Bldg" by Steve Dean Photography , public domain

Chesapeake & Ohio Canal

National Historical Park - DC,MD,WV

The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park is located in the District of Columbia and the states of Maryland and West Virginia. The park preserve the remains of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and many of its original structures. The canal and towpath trail extends along the Potomac River from Georgetown, Washington, D.C., to Cumberland, Maryland, a distance of 184.5 miles (296.9 km).

maps

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/choh/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chesapeake_and_Ohio_Canal_National_Historical_Park The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park is located in the District of Columbia and the states of Maryland and West Virginia. The park preserve the remains of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and many of its original structures. The canal and towpath trail extends along the Potomac River from Georgetown, Washington, D.C., to Cumberland, Maryland, a distance of 184.5 miles (296.9 km). Preserving America's early transportation history, the C&O Canal began as a dream of passage to Western wealth. Operating for nearly 100 years the canal was a lifeline for communities along the Potomac River as coal, lumber, and agricultural products floated down the waterway to market. Today it endures as a pathway for discovering historical, natural, and recreational treasures. The park has numerous access points. There is no main entrance. In Washington, DC, the C&O Canal begins in Georgetown on 29th Street NW, south of M Street, and runs alongside Canal Road / Clara Barton Parkway out of DC to the west. The entrance to Great Falls is at Canal Road and MacArthur Blvd in Potomac, MD. Park Headquarters and the Williamsport Visitor Center are located off I-81 at exit 2. Cumberland Visitor Center is off I-68 at exit 43C. See the maps page for more. Brunswick Visitor Center The Brunswick Visitor Center shares the building with the Brunswick Heritage Museum. For over a century Brunswick has been a railroad town. This once bustling company town is now a quiet place since the decline of the railroads. The remains of the rail yard are still visible from the canal towpath. There is an admission charge for the Railroad section of the museum. From US-340 - Take the MD-17/Burkettsville Road exit toward Brunswick. Turn left onto MD-17/Burkettsville Road and pass through one roundabout. Turn right onto MD-17/MD-79/Petersville Road. At B Street, turn left. Take B Street to North Maryland Avenue and turn right. Turn left onto West Potomac Street and follow to visitor center. Cumberland Visitor Center Located in the Western Maryland Railway station, the visitor center features a spacious exhibit area full of interactive and educational displays about the history of the C&O Canal and Cumberland. Pass through a model of the Paw Paw Tunnel and step back into the hey day of the canal. Awaiting you is a life size section of a canal boat. View exhibits on the canal's construction, cargo, mules, locks, and crew. Take exit 43C off I-68. Follow Harrison to the Visitor Center in the Western Maryland Railway Museum. Georgetown Visitor Center Closed for construction. Great Falls Tavern Visitor Center The Great Falls of the Potomac have drawn people to the river's shore for centuries. To American Indians, a gathering place; to George Washington, an impediment to navigation; to thousands of visitors every year, an awe-inspiring site. Throughout the generations Great Falls Tavern continues a long tradition of hospitality. For more information please call 301-767-3714 From Washington DC: Take M Street to fork. Follow either MacArthur Blvd, the right fork or take Canal Road, the fork to the left. MacArthur Blvd.: Follow MacArthur until the entrance to the Great Falls section of the park, approximately 8 miles. Canal Road: Follow to Chain Bridge. At stop light continue straight. Canal Road changes into Clara Barton Parkway. Follow Clara Barton Parkway to the end. At the stop sign, turn left onto MacArthur Blvd., and follow it for 3.5 miles until it ends at the park. Hancock Visitor Center Nestled along the towpath at milepost 123 in Hancock, Maryland, the charming Bowles House has seen its share of American history. This house is open seasonally. Take I-70 to Hancock and take interstate exit 3 (MD-144 to Hancock). After the ramp bear right on E Main St. and make the first left hand turn. Park in the C&O Canal parking lot. The Hancock Visitor Center in the Historic Bowles House is to the right of the parking lot as you are driving in on the access road (note that the Hancock Maintenance yard at the opposite end of the parking lot is only accessible for official business). Williamsport Visitor Center Situated at the confluence of the Conococheague Creek and the Potomac River, Williamsport was first settled in 1740. Williamsport is the only place on the canal where examples of major canal structures can be viewed within a half-mile stretch. A half-mile rewatered section of canal leads through the turning basin, under the only Railroad Lift Bridge on the canal, and continues to Lock House 44 and the adjacent lock. The Conocheague Aqueduct is located across from the turning basin. From I-81, take exit 2 and merge onto Potomac Street/US 11 south. Follow straight to visitor center at bottom of hill (approximately 1.4 miles). Antietam Creek Campground Mile 69.4 - The campground has 20 single campsites each with a picnic table, fire ring and grill. Each campsite will accommodate up to eight campers. Protected pit toilets are located between campsite #6 and campsite #7 adjacent to the towpath. A second set of chemical toilets are available down the towpath. Potable water is along the towpath at pumps (may not be available during cold winter months). No vehicular traffic is allowed on the towpath and access to the campsites is by foot only. Tent Only Nonelectric (Peak Season) 20.00 April 15 - November 15 (Peak Season) Tent Only Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 10.00 November 16 - December 31 (Non-Peak Season) Antietam Creek Campground Grass covered campsite with a picknick table. Antietam Creek Campground Bald Eagle Island Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 50.3 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first serve sites Bald Eagle Campground A narrow trail leads to a small clearing. Bald Eagle Campground Big Woods Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 82.7 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Cacapon Junction Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 133.6 - No fee charged; this is a first-come first served walk in campsite. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-In, tent-only site 0.00 Each site is allowed 8 people maximum and 2 tents Cacapon Junction Hiker-Biker Campsite Campsite signs in front of a grassy area. Cacapon Junction Hiker-Biker Campsite Calico Rocks Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 47.6 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Chisel Branch Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 30.5 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Chisel Branch Campground A patch of green grass lined by trees. Chisel Branch Campground Cumberland Valley Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 95.2 - No fee charged; this is a first-come first served walk in campsite. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Cumberland Valley campsite A water pump is seen in the foreground of the open grassy campsite area. Cumberland Valley Campsite along the Potomac River, below Williamsport. Devil's Alley Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 144.5 - No fee charged; this is a first-come first served walk in campsite. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Evitts Creek Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 180.1 - No fee charged; this is a first-come first served walk in campsite. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-In Tent Only Site 0.00 First come, first served. Evitts Creek Hiker-Biker Campground A grass filled campsite Evitts Creek Hiker Biker Campground Fifteen Mile Creek Campground Mile 140 - The campground has nine single drive-in campsites. There is one group site available that does not have direct vehicle access. The group site can accommodate 30 people. Each single will accommodate up to eight people. Single campsites have a picnic table, fire ring and grill. Protected pit toilets are located between campsite #3 and campsite #4 along the dead end circle. Potable hand pump water is available from April 15 - October 31. No motor vehicle traffic is allowed on the towpath. Group Tent Only Area Nonelectric (Peak Season) 40.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Group Tent Only Area Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 20.00 November 16 - April 15 (Non-Peak Season) Standard Nonelectric (Peak Season) 20.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Standard Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 10.00 November 16 - April 15 (Non-Peak Season) Fifteen Mile Creek Campground A picnic table and camp stove lined by trees with the Potomac River in the background. Fifteen Mile Creek Campground Horsepen Branch Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 26.1 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Horseshoe Bend Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 79.2 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 Sleeps 8 people, 2 tents Horseshoe Bend Hiker-Biker Campsite A campsite in the trees surrounded by a fence. Horseshoe Bend Hiker-Biker Campsite Huckleberry Hill Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 62.0 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Indian Flats Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 42.5 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Indian Flats Hiker-Biker Campsite A small campsite tucked in the trees with a picnic table and firepit. Indian Flats Hiker-Biker Campsite Indigo Neck Hiker Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 139.2 - No fee charged. First come, first served. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Indigo Neck Hiker-Biker Campsite A trail leads to a grassy campsite in the trees. Indigo Neck Hiker-Biker Campsite Iron's Mountain Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 175.3 - No fee charged; this is a first-come first served walk in campsite. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Irons Mountain Hiker-Biker Campsite A grass covered campsite Irons Mountain Hiker-Biker Campsite Jordan Junction Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 101.2 - There is no driving access to this campsite. No fee charged. First come, first served. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Jordan Junction Hiker Biker Campsite Campground sign surrounded by fallen leaves. Hiker-Biker campsites are located every 5-7 miles along the towpath Killiansburg Cave Hiker Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 75.2 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Killiansburg Cave Hiker Biker Campsite The campsite parallels the towpath. Hiker-Biker Campsites are conveniently located directly along the towpath. Leopards Mill Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 129.9 - There is no driving access to this campsite. No fee charged. First come, first served. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 Each site is allowed 2 tents and up to 8 people. Leopards Mill Hiker-Biker Campsite A picnic table and grill sit in a grassy area. Leopards Mill Hiker-Biker Campsite Licking Creek Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 116.0 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Little Pool Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 120.4 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Little Pool Hiker-Biker Campsite A path leads to a grassy area in the trees. Little Pool Hiker-Biker Campsite Marble Quarry Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 38.2 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Marble Quarry Hiker Biker Campsite Campsite and Trash-free Park signage in front of open area. Each campsite provides directions to next nearest camping area as well as trash bags. Marsden Tract Group Campground Mile 11.5 - The campground has six group campsites; all will accommodate up to 30 campers at each site. Each campsite has a picnic table and a fire ring. Portable toilets and potable water are located a short walk up the towpath and across the footbridge (water may not be available during cold winter months). No vehicle traffic is allowed on the towpath and access to the campsites is by foot only. Carderock Recreation Area or Angler's Inn are the two closest parking areas. Group Tent Only Area Nonelectric (Peak Season) 40.00 April 15 - November 15 (Peak Season) Group Tent Only Area Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 20.00 November 16 - April 14 (Non-Peak Season) Hand Pump Water when in season Towpath near Marsden Tract Walkway from MacArthur Blvd Campsite with Picnic Tables Great Falls of the Potomac Lock 20 at Great Falls Tavern Entrance to Sites 4, 5, 6 Wood Shed Unloading walkway from MacArthur Blvd Great Falls of the Potomac Campsite 2 Unloading parking off of MacArthur Blvd Restrooms at Sites 1, 2, 3 Campsite 1 Campsite around fire pit with large tree stumps Entrance to Sites 1, 2, 3 Drinking Water across bridge Mccoys Ferry Campground Mile 110.4 - The campground has 12 single drive-in campsites. Each single will accommodate up to eight people. Single campsites have a picnic table, fire ring and grill. There is one group site available with space for two vehicles and a small trailer or support vehicle less than 20 ft. The group site can accommodate 30 people and has four picnic tables with grill and fire pit. Protected pit toilets and accessible portable toilets are available. Potable hand pump water is available April 15 - November 1. Group Standard Nonelectric (Peak Season) 40.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Group Standard Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 20.00 November 16 - December 15 (Non-Peak Season) Standard Nonelectric (Peak Season) 20.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Standard Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 10.00 November 16 - December 15 (Non-Peak Season) McCoys Ferry Campground A water pump sits next to the towpath. McCoys Ferry Campground North Mountain Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 110.0 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served North Mountain Hiker-Biker Campsite Campsite sign describing next nearest camping areas. Hiker-Biker campsites are easily located along the towpath. Opequon Junction Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 90.9 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Paw Paw Tunnel Campground Mile 156 - There are 10 single campsites, each has a picnic table, fire ring and grill. Each site can accommodate eight people. If there is a larger group, reserve two sites next to each other. Portable toilets are available. Hamp pump water is available from April 15-November 1. Tent Only Nonelectric (Peak Season) 20.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Tent Only Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 10.00 November 16 - April 15 Paw Paw Campground A grassy campsite sits with a lockhouse in the background. Paw Paw Campground Pigmans Ferry Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 169.1 - No fee charged. First come, first served. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Pigmans Ferry Hiker-Biker Campsite A water pump sits next to the towpath. Hiker-Biker campsites are located every 5-7 miles along the towpath. Potomac Forks Hiker Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 164.8 - No fee charged. First come, first served. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. Campground has a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Potomac Forks Hiker-Biker Campsite A picnic table and grill sit next to a tree. Potomac Forks Hiker-Biker Campsite Purslane Run Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 156.9 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Sorrel Ridge Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 154.1 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Sorrel Ridge Hiker-Biker Campground A dirt path cuts through the trees to a distant campsite. Sorrel Ridge Hiker-Biker Campground Spring Gap Campground Mile 173.3 - Spring Gap Campground offers 12 single drive-in campsites and two drive-in group sites. Campsites 1, 2, 8, 11 and 13 can fit a single vehicle (i.e., car/pickup/van). Campsites 3-7, 12, 14 can fit a small 20 ft. or less RV/trailer/pop-up. Single sites can accommodate up to eight people. Each single has a picnic table, fire pit and grill. Campsites 9 and 10 are group sites capable of holding 30 people each. The group site has room for two vehicles. Group Standard Nonelectric (Peak Season) 40.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Group Standard Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 20.00 November 16 - April 15 (Non-Peak Season) Standard Nonelectric (Peak Season) 20.00 April 16 - November 15 (Peak Season) Standard Nonelectric (Non-Peak Season) 10.00 November 16 - April 15 (Non-Peak Season) Spring Gap Campground A path leads to a green campsite. Spring Gap Hiker-Biker Campsite Stickpile Hill Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 149.4 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Swains Lock Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 16.6 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 No fee, first come, first served Town Creek Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 162.1 - No fee charged. Stay is limited to one night per site, per trip. All sites have a chemical toilet, water, a picnic table, and grill. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from November 15 to April 15 each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come, first served. Town Creek Hiker-Biker Campsite A grassy area with a picnic table, grill, and fire pit. Town Creek Hiker-Biker Campsite Turtle Run Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 34.4 - Hiker-biker campgrounds are located along the towpath approximately every 5-7 miles. No fee or reservation required. Overnight stays are limited to one night. All sites include a chemical toilet, picnic table, grill, and drinking water. Please Note: Potable water may not be available at each campsite. Water is treated with iodine. Please plan to have water purification tablets with you. Water is turned off from mid-November to mid-April each year. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First come, first served Turtle Run Hiker Biker Campsite Campsite sign in front of camping area. Each campsites offers directions to the next nearest camping area. White Rock Hiker-Biker Overnight (HBO) Campsite Mile 126.4 - There is no driving access to this campsite. There is no fee charged. First come, first served. Stay is limited to one site per night per trip. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 2 tents, 8 people max per site White Rock Hiker-Biker Campsite Hiker-Biker campsite sign in front of open camping area. Hiker-Biker campsites vary in size along the towpath. Great Falls of the Potomac The rushing river cascades over the rocks of the Potomac The area of Great Falls is one of the reasons for the C&O Canal needed to be built for boat traffic. Bike rider along the towpath A single bike rider on the towpath next to the widewater section of the canal. The towpath offers a serene bike riding experience. Lockhouse 16 along the Canal A whitewashed lockhouse sits above a stone lock with wooden crib. Lockhouse 16 sits atop a stone outcropping above the lock. Hancock Visitor Center (Bowles House) Park sign in front of the historic Bowles House One of seven Park visitor centers, the Bowles House sits along an empty canal bed in Hancock. Big Slackwater Fog over the Potomac River alongside the Canal towpath. Big Slackwater is a 3 mile stretch where canal boats entered the Potomac River to travel above Dam 4. Charles F. Mercer Replica Canal Boat A replica double decker canal boat is being pulled upstream by mules. Mule-drawn canal boat rides are offered at Great Falls Tavern, April through October. Stratified Prehistoric Archeological Sites in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal NHP Discovering deeply buried archeological sites requires careful planning and special techniques. Testing to a depth of 11 feet in selected areas along the floodplain of the Potomac River succeeded in finding 16 new sites in the C&O Canal National Historical Park. Archeologists selected two sites for further exploration and made exciting and significant discoveries. As with many archeological resources, erosion presents a serious threat to these endangered sites. [photo] Excavated embankment, with inset showing ancient tools found onsite. Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit Lichens and Air Quality Lichens are durable enough to grow on tree bark and bare rock, yet are sensitive to pollution and air quality. One species in particular was used to track levels of air-borne lead over a 100 year period! Pale green lichen growing on rock. 2015 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Six people and programs received the 2015 Harzog Award for their exceptional volunteer service. Check out their amazing contributions! Young volunteer giving a thumbs up sign Crossing Over The Confederate and the Union armies are coming to blows in Maryland Sketch of General McClellan riding through Frederick Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Assessing the relative vulnerability of sensitive karst habitats containing rare, threatened, and endangered species in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park The authors highlight the development of a vulnerability risk-impact matrix, a decision-support tool intended to help prioritize management needs related to karst features and associated at-risk species. A scientist studies a rock formation A Chance at Freedom The chance at freedom was on the minds of all enslaved people in the United States during the Civil War. Through efforts of Harriet Tubman, and others like her, those enslaved could escape to free lands. Also the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal was a route out of slavery and into freedom. Photograph of Henry Williams and Andrew Jenkins with a canal boat. Sustainability in Action: Reducing C&O Canal's Carbon Footprint American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. Amphibians in the Potomac Gorge The C&O Canal's Potomac Gorge area is rich with a wide variety of frogs and salamanders. From wood frogs and red-spotted newts to marbled salamanders and toads, these amphibians are part of what makes the Potomac Gorge (the area around Great Falls) a unique and treasured place. A spotted brown frog sits atop floating leaves in a shallow pool. C&O Trees in Uplands and Lowlands Flooding effects lots of things- including which tree species dominate the dry uplands and the flood-prone lowlands. Here's how to let the trees tell you where you are. A green, springtime forest landscape. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall 2017 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the national and regional winners of the 2017 Freeman Tilden Award; the National Park Service's highest award for excellence in interpretation. Portrait of Hollie Lynch The Border States The existence of divided populations in Border States had a profound impact on Union and Confederate strategy-both political and military. Each side undertook military and political measures--including brutal guerilla warfare-- in their attempts to control areas of divided loyalty and hostile moral and political views held by local civilians. Painting showing removal of Missouri civilians from their homes by Union troops The Fall of Harpers Ferry Description of the battle at Harpers Ferry Photograph of men of the 22nd New York State Militia near by Harper's Ferry NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Washington D.C., Maryland, and West Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] rock wall detail showing local stone types The Workers Who Built the C&O Canal The Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Canal is one of the most intact and impressive surviving examples of the American canal-building era. Construction began on July 4, 1828; on its completion in 1850, the canal stretched 185 miles from Washington, D.C. to Cumberland, Maryland. The untold stories of the lives of the workers that constructed the canal have the potential to add another dimension to the C&O Canal’s historical significance. Stonemason in costume with hammer and chisel. Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Industry and Economy during the Civil War Both North and South mobilized industry to an unprecedented degree. But the North, which already had a head start in nearly every realm of industrial and agricultural development, far outpaced the South during the war. Unhampered by the southern opposition in such areas as providing free land to farmers and subsidizing a transcontinental railroad before the war, Congress passed sweeping legislation to expand the economy. As the war dragged on, in part because many of the ba Lithograph showing industrial and technological advancements of the Civil War Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. Eastern Hemlocks in the National Capital Region Many evergreen, Eastern hemlock trees, typically found growing alongside forest streams, have succumbed to two insect pests. In the National Capital Region, we looked for surviving trees, and what other tree species are poised to replace hemlocks. An evergreen branch with white fuzzy nubs along the stems. Thomas Cresap and Maryland’s Colonial Frontier One of the most famous figures in the history of colonial Maryland is frontiersman Thomas Cresap. Cresap was a hired ruffian, an Indian trader, a land speculator, a farmer, and a soldier. During the French and Indian War his house was, for a time, the furthest westward point of British control in the Middle Atlantic region. Archeologists recently discovered the site of his home in the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park. Paste gemstone from Cresap's Fort. Conserving the C&O Canal National Historical Park's Cultural Landscape Spanning 184.5 miles and encompassing over 20,000 acres along the Potomac River, the C&O Canal conserves a rich cultural landscape containing over 1,000 historic structures. (November 2019) Conserving the Cultural Landscape Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Area parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Archeology at C & O Canal in Paw Paw Tunnel and Brickworks The 3,118-foot Paw Paw tunnel, has a compelling history, labored by over 400 immigrant workers, mainly Irish, who were fighting for work rights. Brick clamp excavation Through Their Eyes Children, who were not fighting on the front lines, were fighting their own battle at home. The unknown certainty of what war brings, especially in regards to loved ones off fighting but also how their daily lives changed. The war was affecting civilians, especially children, and not just the soldiers. Photograph of a young girl holding a picture of a family member that has gone to war Taking the Battle North Lee was on the move North and bringing the battle closer to Union homes Sketch of Confederate General Jackson's men crossing over into Maryland Amphibian Disease Risk in the National Capital Area Looking for disease, including ranaviruses and chytrid fungi, is an important part of amphibian monitoring done by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Learn more about the risks posed by these diseases and the biosecurity protocols field crews use to reduce the risk of accidental spread. Red-spotted newt on brown forest floor leaves. Black spots and eyes contrast with vivid orange skin. Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. Lifeblood of a Nation The blood of a nation - its life, its health, its wealth - is carried by arteries of railroads, rivers, roads and canals. During the Civil War, as the armies marched back and forth across the landscape and the blood of its citizens was spilled, these arteries became more important than ever. Photo of Monocacy Aqueduct along the C&O Canal American Chestnuts in the Capital Region In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in parks of the National Capital Region Green American chestnut tree leaves on a slender branch. Freshwater Sponges Freshwater sponges are found in lakes and streams growing on firm substrates like rocks and branches. They feed by filtering small particles from the water. Though little is known about these sponges in the Mid-Atlantic, they are usually a sign of good water quality. A freshwater sponges attached to a streambed rock. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Series: No Time for Games The Civil War affected more than the soldiers on the battlefield. An entire generation was shaped by their perception of events during this critical chapter of American history and the weight of war was borne on little shoulders as well as large. Whether they snuck into the army, served as drummer boys, helped tend the wounded, or faced every day as a struggle to stay alive, the perspectives of children offer unique insight into the effects of the Civil War. "The great objects in life were Photograph of a Union family at a military camp Series: Born of Earnest Struggle When the Civil War began in 1861, President Abraham Lincoln's primary concern was saving the Union and preventing the fracturing of the nation. After the failure of the Peninsula Campaign in the summer of 1862, Union morale was low. The northern economy was shaky, optimism for victory had faded, and Lincoln's Cabinet feared growing Confederate strength would encourage foreign intervention. Lincoln began to see freeing the slaves, not as a constitutional dilemma or a moral choice, but as a way of Photograph of unnamed Union African American troops Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: The Lost Orders As Lee invaded the north he hoped to rally the support of the people of Maryland, resupply his exhausted army, and draw the Union army far beyond its supply depots and fortifications, where they might be dealt a more decisive blow. On September 9 he ordered his Chief of Staff to write and distribute Special Orders 191, which laid out his plans for splitting the army and the movements for the next three days. A lost copy of the order was left behind in a field near Frederick, MD wrapped in an env Photograph of Robert E. Lee Series: A Savage Continual Thunder In September 1862 Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee changed the course of the Civil War. By crossing the Potomac River he moved from defending the south and its people to invading northern territory. He hoped that a major victory on Union soil would encourage European recognition of the Confederacy, crush northern morale, and force President Lincoln to sue for peace. As the Union Army of the Potomac scrambled to meet the Southern threat, President Lincoln hoped that Lee's invasion would lead to a U Lithograph of Battle of Antietam Four Locks Cultural Landscape The Four Locks is a component landscape of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. The inventory unit is about 950 acres and is located southwest of Clear Springs, Maryland. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is listed on the National Register under Criteria A and C for its architecture, engineering, commerce, transportation, conservation and military history. Its period of significance is listed as 1828–1924. Four Locks cultural landscape (Four Locks: CLI, NPS, 2008) Great Falls Tavern Cultural Landscape The Great Falls Tavern component landscape is located on the east bank of the Potomac River approximately fifteen miles northwest of Washington, D.C. The site landscape is defined by its periods of development, which began in the early eighteenth century. The landscape was primarily industrial and commercial until the closing of the canal in 1924, when recreational uses came to the fore. The Tavern seen from the hillside to the east, 2000 (Great Falls Tavern: CLI, NPS, 2004) Seneca Lock Cultural Landscape Seneca Lock is a component landscape of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. It consists of about 30 acres and is located at the mouth of Seneca Creek in Montgomery County, Maryland. Its significant contribution to the broad patterns of history reflects the ascent of canal-based transportation and its ultimate decline in 19th-century. Lock 24 and Seneca Aqueduct (CHOH Photo Files) Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks Silurian Period—443.8 to 419.2 MYA Excellent exposures and well-preserved fossils in Silurian rocks of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve provide clues to the timing of the assembly of Alaska’s assembly from a variety of continental fragments. fossil corals in a rock matrix Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch Prescribed fire in the national capital area Learn how the National Park Service uses prescribed fire in the National Capital Area. Stewardship in Art This activity of the Virtual Junior Ranger: Canal Stewards program highlights the role art plays in preserving National Parks. Can art help save scenic views? You will use your imagination, creativity, and outdoor explorer skills to find out how art can start a conservation movement. No drawing skills required! Monocacy Aqueduct and its reflection on the Potomac River. Stewardship in History Fossils found deep underground, monuments of national leaders, or even very old lockhouses: reminders of our history help us appreciate the challenges of our past and make better decisions for our future. Take the Canal Preservation challenge! This activity of the Virtual Junior Ranger: Canal Stewards program highlights the role NPS plays in preserving history and culture. Colored painting of scenic view near Lock 7 in Glen Echo, Maryland. Stewardship in STEM Science, technology, engineering, and math (aka STEM) helps reinforce stewardship principles. This activity of the Virtual Junior Ranger: Canal Stewards program highlights the various STEM jobs at NPS that make protecting and conserving critical habitats, precious wildlife, and scenic views possible. Youth in canoe scooping algae with nets in the Cushwa Basin. Stewardship in Recreation Stewardship helps ensure park visitors can have enjoy the Canal today, and in the future! Try Leave No Trace charades, learn how to photograph wildlife safely, play a new Trail Game, and more. This activity of the Virtual Junior Ranger: Canal Stewards program highlights recreational opportunities and ways to #RecreateResponsibly in your National Parks. Youth group learning about mules from a Park Ranger. Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Top 10 Tips for Visiting C&O Canal Learn how to best plan your visit to C&O Canal with tips from rangers. The arch of the Conocheague Aqueduct spans over head as we look at a bridge in the distance. Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Virtual Junior Ranger Summer Camp: Day 1—Kick Start to Summer Learn about the popular Passport to Your National Parks and TRACK Trails programs at the C&O Canal National Historical Park then plan your next outdoor adventure with Day 1 of your Kick Start to Summer Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Park Ranger with youth observing nature beyond the boardwalk. Virtual Junior Ranger Summer Camp: Day 2—Kick Start to Summer Play some Outdoor Olympics and invite some friendly competition with these fun games! Day 2 activities encourage getting outdoors, getting active, and lots of PLAY. Invite a neighborhood pal, family member, or friend to join you in your summer camp adventure! Youth playing in a grassy field. Virtual Junior Ranger Summer Camp: Day 4—Kick Start to Summer Let's get outdoors! Let's go garden! Surrounding yourself with nature and beauty is a wonderful way to spend an afternoon. In this activity you will be invited to explore some natural splendor and then participate in an activity to grow your own flowers. Interns planting at the C&O Canal. Virtual Junior Ranger Summer Camp: Day 3—Kick Start to Summer Got plastic water bottles, newspaper, or cereal boxes collecting in your recycling bin? Flex your creativity skills and repurpose items lying around your house with these fun activities. Your imagination is the only limit! Youth participating in a creative activity. Virtual Junior Ranger Summer Camp: Day 5—Kick Start to Summer The C&O Canal is filled with scenic views, natural beauty, wildlife, and picturesque examples of 1800s engineering. Learn how to sustainably take pictures in the Park, how art has inspired conservation, and even view artwork from youth inspired by nature across the National Park Service. Youth sitting atop rocks at the Great Falls location of the C&O Canal. Virtual Junior Ranger Summer Camp: Kick Start to Summer Now that your summer vacation has officially begun, it's time that time of year—Kick Start to Summer! With this Virtual Junior Ranger (VJR) Summer Camp series (try saying that 5 times fast) you will get 5-days worth of activities you can do at your C&O Canal National Historical Park or even in your own backyard. Youth playing tug-of-war at the C&O Canal. The Power of Water: Transportation The C&O Canal was used largely to transport goods up, all the way near West Virginia and Western Maryland, all the way down to the former port city of Georgetown, Washington, DC, bordering of Virginia. In this article you'll learn about a key function of the Chesapeake & Ohio (C&O) Canal during its peak operation: transportation. You will also learn what a canal is, how it works, and where it got its name from. Historical black and white photo of men, women, and children aboard a canal boat. The Power of Water: Creating Energy Water is all around us! Water is in our homes, comes rushing down when it rains, and even a major part of our National Parks. Together, let's learn how water creates energy. In this NPS article series, you will answer the following questions: How does water create energy? How does the Potomac River create energy? Where are examples of water creating energy throughout the C&O Canal? Scenic view of the rushing waters and geological wonders of the Potomac Gorge at Great Falls. The Power of Water: Supporting Life Water has the power to support a plethora of living organisms. From plants, animals, fungi, algae, large, small, and everything in between, water supports life in a wide range of ways. In this NPS article, you'll learn about the plants and animals that call the Potomac River home along, what natural events and human actions can impact water quality, and finally, what you can do to do your part! Up close image of a gray, yellow, and black sunbreast fish. The Power of Water: Shaping Communities Waterways have the power to bring people together, boost economies, and drive development. In this NPS article, you'll learn how the Potomac River and the C&O Canal helped shape communities and Canal Towns. Historical black and white photo of men, women, and children gathered on a canal boat. Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background. Camping Is for Everyone What does camping mean to you? For Latino Conservation Week 2021 (LCW 2021), our partner Hispanic Access Foundation (HAF) brought their staff, Fellows, and alumni on a traditional camping trip over one weekend from July 24-25, 2021. Group photo near the Potomac River

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