"Surrender Field" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Colonial

National Historical Park - Virginia

Colonial National Historical Park is located in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia and is operated by the National Park Service of the United States government. The park protects and interprets several sites relating to the Colony of Virginia and the history of the United States more broadly, ranging from the site of the first landing of the English settlers who would settle at Jamestown, to the battlefields of Yorktown where the British Army was finally defeated in the American Revolutionary War.

maps

Official visitor map of Colonial National Historic Park (NHP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Colonial - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Colonial National Historic Park (NHP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Jamestowne National Historical Park (NHP), part of Colonial National Historical Park (NHP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Jamestowne - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Jamestowne National Historical Park (NHP), part of Colonial National Historical Park (NHP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Jamestowne National Historical Park (NHP) in Virginia, part of Colonial National Historical Park (NHP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Jamestowne - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Jamestowne National Historical Park (NHP) in Virginia, part of Colonial National Historical Park (NHP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/colo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_National_Historical_Park Colonial National Historical Park is located in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia and is operated by the National Park Service of the United States government. The park protects and interprets several sites relating to the Colony of Virginia and the history of the United States more broadly, ranging from the site of the first landing of the English settlers who would settle at Jamestown, to the battlefields of Yorktown where the British Army was finally defeated in the American Revolutionary War. On May 13, 1607, Jamestown was established as the first permanent English settlement in North America. Three cultures came together – European, Virginia Indian and African–to create a new society that would eventually seek independence from Great Britain. On October 19, 1781, American and French troops defeated the British at Yorktown in the last major battle of the American Revolutionary War. For an internet map search or GPS, use the following: Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center, 1000 Colonial Parkway, Yorktown, Virginia 23690. Historic Jamestowne Visitor Center, 1368 Colonial Parkway, Jamestown, Virginia 23081. Historic Jamestowne The Historic Jamestowne Visitor Center is open for access to the Preservation Virginia Museum store and for fee collection. The theater and exhibit areas are currently closed. The Historic Jamestowne ENTRANCE GATE opens 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. daily. Historic Jamestowne Gift Shop is open 9 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. daily. Glasshouse is open 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. FROM INTERSTATE 64 (I-64) When traveling east or west on I-64 take exit 242A . To reach Historic Jamestowne from the east take Interstate 64 West to the intersection of Route 199 West, Exit 242A. Follow 199 West to the Colonial Parkway, then follow the signs to Historic Jamestowne. From the west: Take Interstate 64 East to Route 199 West, Exit 242A. Follow 199 West to the Colonial Parkway, then follow the signs to Historic Jamestowne. FROM WILLIAMSBURG Take Colonial Parkway 9 miles south to the Historic Jam Yorktown Battlefield Yorktown Battlefield Visitor center is open for access to the Eastern National Bookstore which is open 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Closed on Christmas Day and New Years Day. Theater is closed. Exhibit area is currently open. The Moore House, Nelson House, Cemetery Lodge, and Poor Potter are closed, but their grounds are open for visitation. Yorktown Battlefield is located a short distance from Interstate 64 (I-64). Eastbound from the Richmond area via I-64, exit 242B for Yorktown, to the Colonial Parkway. Follow the parkway to its end. West bound Interstate 64 from the Virginia Beach/Norfolk/Hampton area for Yorktown should take Route 105 East (Fort Eustis Boulevard east), exit 250B to Route 17 (George Washington Memorial Highway). Turn left (North) onto Route 17. Follow the signs to the Yorktown Battlefield. Yorktown Battlefield Yorktown Battlefield Reconstructed Revolutionary War Canon in Winter Bikers at Entrance to Historic Jamestowne Tour Road Bikers at Entrance to Historic Jamestowne Tour Road Weekend Biking Near Tour Road Historic Jamestowne Visitor Center Historic Jamestowne Visitor Center Volunteer Informing Visitors of Interpretive Programs Bacon's Rebellion Bacon's Rebellion Living History Program The Royal Artillery Living History Team Firing Yorktown Battlefield's 6 Pounder The Royal Artillery Living History Team Firing Yorktown Battlefield's 6 Pounder Living History Program Yorktown National Cemetery Yorktown National Cemetery This site was selected in 1866 as a good cemetery location in the general vicinity of various Civil War battlefields and scenes of action related particularly to the Peninsular Campaign of 1862 Colonial Parkway Colonial Parkway The Colonial Parkway is a twenty-three mile scenic roadway stretching from the York River at Yorktown to the James River at Jamestown Benedict Arnold, 1741 - 1801 It has been said that had Benedict Arnold died at the Battles of Saratoga, he would have been considered as one of America's greatest heroes. Instead, he died in England in June of 1801 as General Washington's most brilliant tactician and America's worst betrayer. Thomas Hart painting of Benedict Arnold. Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network Species Spotlight: Atlantic Sturgeon In the James and York Rivers surrounding Colonial National Historical Park, Atlantic sturgeon are an elusive species. But this was not always the case. The James River was teeming with sturgeon when the first English colonists arrived, but overfishing dealt a huge blow to sturgeon population numbers thereafter. Now protected, efforts at both the state and federal level continue to help bring the Atlantic sturgeon back from the brink of extinction. An Atlantic sturgeon jumps out of the James River, Virginia in 2014 NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] tall masonry monument on parklands National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house Eagles Have Peaceful Easy Feeling Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nesting on national park and associated lands in the Chesapeake Bay are doing well. A recent study shows their numbers, once crippled by the effects of the insecticide DDT and other pollutants, are now growing. And juvenile eagles screened for pollutants generally showed low and undetectable exposure levels. A fluffy black eaglet sit on a towel in the sun Underwater Survey at Colonial NHP When Captain John Smith observed the waters surrounding Jamestown Island four centuries ago, he was impressed by the sheer quantity of fish. Today archeologists are impressed by the quantity of archeological resources discovered between the waterline and as far as 1000 feet offshore. Careful scanning with sonar as well as diving in the murky water revealed at least 26 shipwrecks as well as landings, wharves, and piers along the shoreline. Archeologist swimming Veterans Make A Difference On National Public Lands Day Colonial National Historical Park concluded fiscal year 2017 on National Public Lands Day with the help of Team Rubicon and the Wounded Warrior Project. Check out the tasks these two groups of veterans took on and how it benefits the park and community. Group of volunteers after an event. Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network Species Spotlight: Bald Eagle The bald eagle, America's national symbol, has recovered from the brink of extinction after decades of pesticide poisoning diminishing their populations. Now, on the banks of the Chesapeake Bay, bald eagle populations have bounced back. Nesting at Colonial National Historical Park, the bald eagle population continues to be monitored by biologists from various organizations to ensure that the population remains healthy and thriving in the face of human development. A bald eagle prepares to land in it’s nest high atop a pine at Colonial National Historical Park Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail e-Newsletter Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail, WARO quarterly e-newsletter Colonial Parkway Reconstruction Fact Sheet Major rehabilitation and reconstruction are essential to preserve this scenic and historic 23 mile drive. Colonial Parkway Integrated Coastal Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment at Colonial National Historical Park With Colonial National Historical Park as the pilot, partners from the University of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center developed and tested a vulnerability assessment approach that considers a subset of climate drivers and potential associated vulnerabilities of natural resources, cultural resources and facilities. The resulting report, Integrated coastal climate change vulnerability assessment: Colonial National Historical Park, is available. Herbert Hoover's National Parks Herbert Hoover is not thought of as one of our better presidents, but he made lasting contributions in the national parks he established. During Herbert Hoover's presidency from 1929 to 1933, the land designated for new national parks and monuments increased by 40 percent. Sepia photo of Herbert Hoover standing at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Counting Fossils in Colonial Virginia During COVID-19 The first paleontological inventory of Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia, began in 2020. This historically notable area also hosts exposures of fossil-bearing rocks, and the fossils here have been collected since at least the 17th century. The execution of this project has had to face additional challenges imposed by the emergence of COVID-19. a large assortment of shells spread on a wood plank Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossils on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Series: The People of Fort Stanwix Many different people and people groups have traversed the Oneida Carry throughout its history; from natives of the Six Nations Confederacy, to armies, to families and politicians. Learn more about many of these noted individuals and groups in the following series. A statue of a man in Continental Soldier uniform. His hand on his hip hold a sword hilt. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network Species Spotlight Learn more about species that call national parks within the Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network (NCBN) home! a peregrine falcon takes flight from the beach at Assateague Island National Seashore. The 1st New York Regiment of the Continental Line 1776-1783 The regiment that came to be known as the 1st New York was actually authorized as the 2nd NY Regiment of the Continental Line on May 25, 1775. They were assigned to the Northern Department in Albany, NY with 10 companies from Albany, Tryon, Charlotte, and Cumberland Counties. After a year, Colonel Goose Van Schaick was designated as commander. Continental soldiers with packs on their backs that say "1NY" The 3rd New York Regiment of the Continental Line 1777-1781 The 3rd New York Regiment that defended Fort Schuyler (Stanwix) against the British in 1777 had been reorganized and established from other New York Regiments on January 26, 1777. Two Continental Soldiers stand holding their muskets with bayonets. Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Who Wears the Pants Around Here? After a promising start in the early 1920s, only a handful of women were hired as park rangers and naturalists in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Carlsbad Caverns National Park and the national monuments of the Southwest became the new hot spots for women in uniformed positions in the 1930s. Women in skirts and pants Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air.

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