"Snow Lays on the Mountain" by NPS Photo / Katy Hooper , public domain

Coronado

National Memorial - Arizona

Chiricahua National Monument is a unit of the National Park System located in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The monument was established on April 18, 1924, to protect its extensive hoodoos and balancing rocks.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Coronado National Memorial (NMEM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Coronado - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Coronado National Memorial (NMEM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Cochise County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Cochise County

Cochise County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/coro/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronado_National_Memorial Chiricahua National Monument is a unit of the National Park System located in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The monument was established on April 18, 1924, to protect its extensive hoodoos and balancing rocks. It was a journey of conquest filled with exploration, wonder - and cruelty. Inspired by tales of vast cities of gold, 339 European soldiers and hundreds of Aztec allies embarked on an epic journey through arid deserts and rugged mountains. They encountered rich traditions and brought new technologies. The resulting collision and combination of cultures reverberates today. From the city of Sierra Vista continue south on Hwy 92 about 20 miles and turn right onto S. Coronado Memorial Drive. Follow Coronado Memorial Drive (it will turn into E Montezuma Canyon Rd) 5 miles to the Visitor Center. Coronado National Memorial Visitor Center The visitor center includes in-depth exhibits on the Coronado Expedition of 1540-1542, as well as thorough information about the natural history of the park. There are hands-on displays of 16th century clothing and armor for visitors to try on, and interactive exhibits in English and Spanish. A 14-foot picture window provides visitors with a wonderful opportunity to view and photograph the flora and fauna in a relaxed atmosphere. From the city of Sierra Vista continue south on Hwy 92 about 20 miles and turn right onto S. Coronado Memorial Drive. Follow Coronado Memorial Drive (it will turn into E Montezuma Canyon Rd) 5 miles to the Visitor Center. Vermillion Flycatcher A brilliant red bird in a tree A great diversity of birds are found in and near Coronado National Memorial Sunset From Montezuma Pass Sun setting over the San Rafael Valley with a cane cholla in the foreground. Sunsets from Montezuma Pass provide a beautiful opportunity to gaze out into the Sky Islands. Cave formations of Coronado Cave Two cavers inspect a series of calcite cave formations Coronado Cave is a large limestone cavern with cave formations such as stalactites and stalagmites Wildflowers and Montezuma Peak Agave stalks and wildflowers with mountains in the distance A field of wildflowers blooms in the grasslands, one of the many life zones in the park Pink-throated morning glories in the grasslands Pink morning glories with mountain and grasslands Each year the pink-throated morning glories bloom during monsoon season in the grasslands It’s Alive! Biological Soil Crusts of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts It might come as a surprise to learn that in the sublime expanses of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts, some of the most interesting life around can be found in the dirt right in front of your feet! Biological soil crusts form a living groundcover that is the foundation of desert plant life. Soil crust at White Sands National Monument Fuels Treatments Help Save Homes and Park Buildings from Wildfire In June 2011, the Monument fire started in Coronado National Memorial, AZ. The fire was suppressed aggressively from time of discovery, but drought conditions made brush and grass extremely flammable. The fire escaped initial attack and spread rapidly. Over 2 weeks, it burned more than 30,000 acres and 84 structures. Fuel reduction treatments completed within the memorial helped save homes and other structures, creating a more fire-adapted community. Vegetation Mapping at Coronado National Memorial Vegetation maps tell park managers what’s growing where, and what kinds of habitat occur in a park. This helps them with many planning, resource, and interpretive activities. At Coronado National Memorial, the Sonoran Desert Network mapped 25 different vegetation associations, ranging from dense, non-native grasslands dominated by exotic Lehmann lovegrass to steep expanses of exposed bedrock dominated by mountain mahogany and evergreen sumac. Map of Coronado NMem with color fields indicating location of different vegetation types NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Coronado National Memorial, Arizona Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. park landscape 2017 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the national and regional winners of the 2017 Freeman Tilden Award; the National Park Service's highest award for excellence in interpretation. Portrait of Hollie Lynch Interdisciplinary Personnel Provide Value Support for Wildland Fire Efforts Nationwide Many of our interdisciplinary agency personnel Servicewide play a key role in supplementing agency fire staff and providing key skill sets for interagency wildland fire efforts nationwide. Personnel from all disciplines – fire management, resource management, visitor and resource protection, administration, facility management, even Superintendents – help support wildland fire activities throughout the year. Three firefighters standing in a field looking into the smoke and sun from a wildfire. Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils in the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert Networks Vegetation and soils are two of many natural resources monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Learning about vegetation dynamics helps us to better understand the integrity of ecological processes, productivity trends, and ecosystem interactions that can otherwise be difficult to monitor. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor vegetation and soils using the scientific protocol described here. Quadrat used for biological soil crust sampling Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. Survey of an endangered bat roost at Coronado National Memorial, Arizona After installation of bat-compatible steel gates at an abandoned mine, video camcorder surveys of lesser long-nosed bat activity provide valuable insight into management of this species on National Park Service lands. Lesser long-nosed bats roost in a mine adit alcove. (Credit: Gabrielle Diamond) Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Native Peoples of the Sonoran Desert: The Nde The Apache (Inde) people came from as far north as Canada. They split into groups and settled across the American southwest. Although frequently cast as villains due to their historically antagonistic relationship with Spanish and American settlements, Apache people have a rich and varied cultural tradition. four dancers, painted white, with black face-coverings, dance in front of a crowd Pollinators - Lesser Long-nose bat Get batty over Lesser Long-nose bats! With tongues as long as their bodies, lesser long-nosed bats (Leptonycteris yerbabuena) are unsung heroes in maintaining fragile desert ecosystems. A researcher's gloved hand holds a brown Lesser Long-nose bat Southwest River Environments In the arid Southwest, water means life, and prehistorically, rivers were the lifelines of the people. The Colorado River flowing through a canyon Southern Basin and Range The Southern Basin and Range is an extension of the Basin and Range Province centered on Nevada and the Great Basin and extending from southern Oregon to western Texas, and into northwest Mexico. Mountains and Desert in Guadalupe Mountains National Park National Park Getaway: Coronado National Memorial Have you ever wondered what it was like to be a Spanish conquistador? Craving an adventure underground? Be ready to learn and explore when you arrive at Coronado National Memorial. The memorial is situated in southeastern Arizona along the US–Mexico border to commemorate and interpret the influence of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado's expedition of 1540–1542. low mountains over a plain with taller, snowy mountains visible in the distance Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Tortillas de harina (Flour Tortillas) What exactly are tortillas? How big are they? Of what are they made? How should they be made? These are questions that can spark much discussion and debate, even among tortilla makers themselves. The important thing is that none of this really matters - they are good, as you will be able to assert for yourself when you eat one made fresh by a Tumacácori demonstrator or in your own kitchen. Tortilla demonstrator in front of Tumacácori mission church Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Native Peoples of the Sonoran Desert Who were the original inhabitants of the Sonoran desert and how did they adapt to the world-changing arrival of Spanish colonists? folklórico dancers with a series of different flags including Arizona and Tohono O'odham The Heliograph: 2020 Edition The Heliograph is the newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue features stories on how we adapted our operations to minimize field work lost to the covid-19 pandemic, vegetation mapping at Saguaro NP, and communication improvements and opportunities for network parks. We also probe the minds of our interns and celebrate a high honor for our program manager. Person wearing hat and face covering sits near a stream with a bucket and net. The Heliograph: Summer 2021 The Heliograph is the newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue shares predictive tools and planning processes that can help park managers make proactive decisions in the face of climate change. We also explore some explanations for this spring's highly unusual saguaro bloom, celebrate our staff members, and provide updates on our monitoring projects. Saguaro cactus with blooms all over its top Climate and Water Monitoring at Chiricahua National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, and Fort Bowie National Historic Site In the national parks of Southeast Arizona, desert plants, wildlife, and visitors all depend on reliable water sources. The Sonoran Desert Network monitors climate, springs, and streams at Chiricahua National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, and Fort Bowie National Historic Site. Understanding changes in these closely linked factors helps managers make informed decisions affecting natural resources. Learn about our recent findings. Green moss grows next to water flowing down a rock face Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Older Caldera Complexes The presence of voluminous ash-flow tuffs are one of the main markers for the presence of older caldera complexes. Subsequent erosion and/or volcanic activity can make their caldera walls hard to find. Most of the older caldera complexes in or near national park sites are very large and were of the resurgent type. photo of hillside with layered rock outcrops Calderas Calderas are large collapse features that can be many miles in diameter. They form during especially large eruptions when the magma chamber is partially emptied, and the ground above it collapses into the momentary void. Crater Lake and Aniakchak Crater are calderas. photo of oblique aerial view of a volcanic caldera with snow and ice Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Explosive Calderas Explosive calderas result from violent eruptions of great quantities of silicic magmas. These eruptions produce massive eruption columns that extend into the stratosphere, and voluminous pyroclastic flows. Eruptions that produce explosive calderas generally range from 6 (Colossal) on the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) to 8 super eruptions (Apocalyptic). digital oblique aerial image of a volcanic caldera Series: The Sonoran Desert Heliograph The Heliograph is the newsletter for the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. Learn about the latest developments in our natural resource inventory and monitoring projects in national parks of the Sonoran Desert and Apache Highlands. Line drawing of a tripod instrument with two mirrors used for signaling. Pyroclastic Flows and Ignimbrites, and Pyroclastic Surges Pyroclastic flows and surges are among the most awesome and most destructive of all volcanic phenomena. Pyroclastic flow deposits are found in at least 21 units of the National Park System. photo of a cloud of ash and dust moving down a mountain side. Monitoring Seeps, Springs, and Tinajas in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts Seeps, springs, and tinajas are critical surface water sources in the arid and semi-arid Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts. They are a primary interface between groundwater and surface water and serve as biodiversity hotspots, supporting obligate (and generally rare) aquatic species and providing access to water for wide-ranging terrerstrial animals. Birds fly over a pond eDNA Inventories to Reveal Species Use of Sonoran Desert Network Springs At nine southwestern parks, Sonoran Desert Network staff are performing environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling. By analyzing the genomes present in a water sample, eDNA sampling allows us to learn which species use a given area without the use of capture, hair snares, or cameras. The results of this inventory will help NPS staff to prioritize springs for monitoring and conservation. A large tinaja set within bedrock walls The Heliograph: Summer 2022 The Heliograph is the newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. In this issue, find out how eDNA inventories may change what we thought we knew about SODN springs. Learn about the new technology that will improve our streams monitoring, and the lasting contributions of our IVIPs to projects across multiple networks. Get caught up on our latest reports and the status of ongoing projects, and find out what’s happening at the DRLC. Two men at the edge of a marsh. One crouches. The other holds a long metal rod with a disc on top.

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