"Winter Panoramic" by National Park Service , public domain

Crater Lake

National Park - Oregon

Crater Lake National Park is in the Cascade Mountains of southern Oregon. It’s known for its namesake Crater Lake, formed by the now-collapsed volcano, Mount Mazama. Wizard Island is a cinder cone near the western edge of the lake. The Rim Drive, a road surrounding the lake, offers views of the park’s volcanic formations. The park’s numerous trails include Sun Notch, with views of the Phantom Ship, a small island.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of North Green Diamond Resource Co. Travel Management Area (TMA) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Green Diamond Resource Co. MVTM - North 2021

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of North Green Diamond Resource Co. Travel Management Area (TMA) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Central Green Diamond Resource Co. Travel Management Area (TMA) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Green Diamond Resource Co. MVTM - Central 2021

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Central Green Diamond Resource Co. Travel Management Area (TMA) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the Eastern part of the Douglas Forest Protection Association area in Oregon. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Douglas Forest Protection Association - East 2020

Map of the Eastern part of the Douglas Forest Protection Association area in Oregon. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of Sand Creek in the Klamath-Lake Protection District in Oregon. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Klamath-Lake - Sand Creek 2014

Map of Sand Creek in the Klamath-Lake Protection District in Oregon. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern part of Tiller Ranger District (RD) in Umpqua National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Umpqua MVUM - Tiller East 2016

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern part of Tiller Ranger District (RD) in Umpqua National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern part of Diamond Lake Ranger District (RD) in Umpqua National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Umpqua MVUM - Diamond Lake East 2016

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern part of Diamond Lake Ranger District (RD) in Umpqua National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Western part of Diamond Lake Ranger District (RD) in Umpqua National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Umpqua MVUM - Diamond Lake West 2016

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Western part of Diamond Lake Ranger District (RD) in Umpqua National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Winter/Spring Visitor Guide to Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guide - Winter/Spring 2021/2022

Winter/Spring Visitor Guide to Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Summer/Fall Visitor Guide to Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guide - Summer/Fall 2021

Summer/Fall Visitor Guide to Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Bicycling at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Bicycling

Brochure for Bicycling at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Fishing at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Fishing

Brochure for Fishing at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Birds at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Birds

Brochure about Birds at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Mammals at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Mammals

Brochure about Mammals at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Reptiles and Amphibians at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Reptiles and Amphibians

Brochure about Reptiles and Amphibians at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Trees at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Trees

Brochure about Trees at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Introduction to Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Introduction

Introduction to Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about the National Park System regarding Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - National Park System

Brochure about the National Park System regarding Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about the Crater Lake Lodge at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Crater Lake Lodge

Brochure about the Crater Lake Lodge at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

History brochure for Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - History

History brochure for Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Geology brochure for Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Geology

Geology brochure for Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about the World's Deepest Lakes, including Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - The World's Deepest Lakes

Brochure about the World's Deepest Lakes, including Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Climate Change at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Crater Lake - Climate Change

Brochure about Climate Change at Crater Lake National Park (NP) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/crla https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater_Lake_National_Park Crater Lake National Park is in the Cascade Mountains of southern Oregon. It’s known for its namesake Crater Lake, formed by the now-collapsed volcano, Mount Mazama. Wizard Island is a cinder cone near the western edge of the lake. The Rim Drive, a road surrounding the lake, offers views of the park’s volcanic formations. The park’s numerous trails include Sun Notch, with views of the Phantom Ship, a small island. Crater Lake inspires awe. Native Americans witnessed its formation 7,700 years ago, when a violent eruption triggered the collapse of a tall peak. Scientists marvel at its purity: fed by rain and snow, it’s the deepest lake in the USA and one of the most pristine on earth. Artists, photographers, and sightseers gaze in wonder at its blue water and stunning setting atop the Cascade Mountain Range. From the west (Medford) - Take Hwy 62 to the West Entrance. Open year-round. From the south (Klamath Falls) - Take Hwy 97 north to Hwy 62 to the South Entrance. Open year-round. The North Entrance is on Hwy 138 and is accessed from Interstate 5 east at Roseburg or Hwy 97 south from Bend and Chemult. Winter travelers from Roseburg take Route 138 east to Route 230 south to Route 62 east to the park's west entrance. Travelers from Bend take Route 97 south to Route 62 to the park's south entrance. Rim Visitor Center Only open in summer, but due to COVID-19 this visitor center was closed in 2020 and 2021. Hours for 2022 will be announced in June. Views of the lake are prominent and accessible from Rim Visitor Center. It is located at the historic Kiser Studio in Rim Village. Outdoor exhibits at the near-by Sinnott Memorial Overlook are likely open until mid-October. Get your passport stamp at the US Post Office located at headquarters, 9am to12pm and 1pm to 3pm. Rim Visitor Center* is in Rim Village, 7 miles north of Highway 62 from Annie Springs Entrance Station or 14 miles south of the North Entrance** via West Rim Drive. Angle-in parking with additional parking in the picnic area. Large vehicles use the dedicated parking area at the entrance to Rim Village or near-by pullouts. *There is no physical address for the Rim Visitor Center. **North Entrance Road and West Rim Drive are closed from November 1 or the first significant snowfall to generally mid-June. Steel Visitor Center Steel Visitor Center is closed through 2022 for a major structural renovation to stabilize the building against seismic and excessive snow load forces. The historic integrity of this former ranger dormitory, now known as the Steel Visitor Center, will remain while accessibility and safety will be increased for all visitors and staff. The building will get new electric wiring, IT cabling, plumbing, heating, and an updated interior building layout. More visitor services info will be added as it is available. Steel Visitor Center is located at park headquarters, 4 miles north of Highway 62 and 3 miles south of Rim Village on Munson Valley Road (sometimes shown on maps as Volcanic Scenic Byway). Turn into park headquarters at the only blinking 3-way stop sign in the park. During summer, there are two accessible parking spaces in front of the flagpole, and drop-off space next to the winter-access snow tunnel on the right side of the visitor center. Lost Creek Campground, elevation is 6,000 feet (1,829 meters) CLOSED 2021 Lost Creek Campground is managed by the National Park Service. It usually opens in early July and closes in mid-October, depending on weather and other factors. It is for tent campers only--NO RVs, buses, trailers, or vans and truck with toilets. Registration is self-serve on the day of arrival. No advance registration is available. The campground fills by mid-afternoon. The only means of knowing site availability is upon arrival at the campground. Tent Only 5.00 All sites are tent-only and are $5 per night. Payment is due the day of arrival when you self-register for a site. Payment is by cash (exact change only) or a check made out to the National Park Service. Credit cards are not accepted. Senior Pass and Access Pass holders are entitled to a 50% discount. Maximum number of people per campsite is 8 with and a maximum of 2 vehicles. Lost Creek Campground is limited to 30 days each calendar year with no more than 14 consecutive days in any park campground. Entrance Sign to Lost Creek Campground four 8-inch, round, brown, wood posts with a cross beam holding the entrance sign to Lost Creek Camp Entrance Sign to Lost Creek Campground Lost Creek Campground Site Campsite with picnic table and bear proof storage container Lost Creek Campsites are settled in a grassy meadow surrounded by conifers. Lost Creek Campsite #14 Campsite with picnic table and bear proof storage container, parking area, and site # post Campsite 14 is in the inner circle. Lost Creek Campsite #4 Campsite with picnic table and bear proof storage container A campsite nestled next to Lost Creek and the Greyback Trail. Mazama Campground Open only in the summer, Mazama Campground has 214 sites in an old-growth forest at an elevation of 6,000 feet (1,829 m). All sites have a picnic table, fire ring, and bear-resistant food locker. The campground is operated by the park's concessioner, Crater Lake Hospitality. In June, some sites are available only on a first-come, first-served basis, all others by reservation. In July, August, and September, all sites are available by advance reservation, either online or by calling 866-292-6720. Tent Site 21.00 Maximum number of people per campsite is 6. Maximum number of vehicles per campsite is 2. If no tent sites are available, tent campers may rent an RV site at the fee posted for that site. Camping is limited to 30 days per year, with no more than 14 consecutive days. Senior Pass and Access Pass holders are entitled to a 50% discount on camping fees. When you make a reservation, you'll be charged the full amount. Upon arrival at the campground with a valid pass and identification you will be refunded 50%. RV No-hookups 31.00 Maximum RV length is 50 feet (15 meters). Maximum trailer length is 35 feet (11 meters). If no tent sites are available, tent campers may rent an RV site at the fee posted for that site. Senior Pass and Access Pass holders are entitled to a 50% discount on camping fees. When you make a reservation, you'll be charged the full amount. Upon arrival at the campground with a valid pass and identification you will be refunded 50%. RV Electricity Only 36.00 Maximum RV length is 50 feet (15 meters). Maximum trailer length is 35 feet (11 meters). Senior Pass and Access Pass holders are entitled to a 50% discount on camping fees. When you make a reservation, you'll be charged the full amount. Upon arrival at the campground with a valid pass and identification you will be refunded 50%. RV Full Hookups 42.00 Maximum RV length is 50 feet (15 meters). Maximum trailer length is 35 feet (11 meters). Senior Pass and Access Pass holders are entitled to a 50% discount on camping fees. When you make a reservation, you'll be charged the full amount. Upon arrival at the campground with a valid pass and identification you will be refunded 50%. PCT Hikers and Bicyclist Walk-In Camp 5.00 This group site is reserved for visitors arriving by bicycle or PCT hikers only. A space in this site may be obtained on the day of arrival and not before. Mazama Campsite blue and white tent next to a picnic table at a campsite A tent campsite at Mazama Village Campground Mazama Campsite Campsite with picnic table, fire ring and wood, two small tents, and a hammock hung between trees Prepared to camp and enjoy a campfire. Amphitheater long benches with a center walk face a raised amphitheater structure with screen The amphitheater hosts nightly ranger programs in July, August, and early September. Wizard Island A view of Crater Lake and Wizard Island Looking at Crater Lake and Wizard Island from Discovery Point Chaski Bay a view of Phantom Ship and Chaski Bay A view from Garfield Peak along the rim of Crater Lake Crater Lake a view of Crater Lake from the lakeshore A view across Crater Lake from the lakeshore Crater Lake from Mount Scott Crater Lake as seen from the summit of Mt. Scott A view of the caldera from Mt. Scott, the highest point in Crater Lake National Park Vidae Falls water flowing over Vidae Falls Water flowing over Vidae Falls Wildflowers on Wizard Island wildflowers on Wizard Island Wildflowers along the Wizard Island Summit Trail Crater Lake in Winter A view of Crater Lake in the winter A view of Crater Lake in the winter Clouds in the Caldera Clouds in the Crater Lake Caldera Clouds in the Crater Lake Caldera Park Air Profiles - Crater Lake National Park Air quality profile for Crater Lake National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Crater Lake NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Crater Lake NP. Wildflowers in Crater Lake National Park Tribute: Gary L. Larson, Limnologist A remembrance of limnologist Gary L. Larson Gary Larson NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Carpenter Ant Curious about carpenter ants? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. close up photo of carpenter ant NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Crater Lake National Park, Oregon Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. illustration of erupting volcano Pileated Woodpecker Curious about the pileated woodpecker in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Face and front of a woodpecker, with black body, red crest, and small blue berry in its beak. Pikas in Peril The National Park Service stewards pika populations in more than a dozen parks and seeks to understand the vulnerability of pikas and other mountain species to climate change. Pikas in Peril, funded in 2010, was a collaborative research program directed by scientists from the National Park Service, Oregon State University, University of Idaho, and University of Colorado-Boulder. Profile of a pika on rough, dark red lava rock. © Michael Durham Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. 2007 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2007 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Vascular plant hyperdiversity in high-elevation riparian communities of National Park Service units in the Klamath Network Monitoring data provide evidence of high vascular plant diversity in riparian environments. This surprising pattern indicates a high conservation significance of these park environments. Stream and forest scene at Lassen Volcanic National Park (Credit: NPS Photo) The impact of introduced crayfish on a unique population of salamander in Crater Lake, Oregon Expansion of introduced crayfish in Crater Lake has and likely will continue to cause declines in the abundance and distribution of the Mazama newt and ultimately could lead to the newt’s extinction. A biologist returns Mazama newts to Crater Lake. Copyright Jeremy Monroe, Freshwaters Illustrated Walking With Wildflowers: Monitoring Pacific Crest Trail Plant Communities as Climate Changes Walking with Wildflowers is a citizen science program dedicated to monitoring plant phenology along the Pacific Crest Trail using observations from hikers and backpackers. Its main goal is to determine whether plant species are able to respond to changing climatic conditions and better understand how plants use seasonal cues to time flowering. Trail through a meadow surrounded by trees, with mountains beyond Giant Water Bug Curious about giant water bugs in Oregon and California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network.” Brown, flattened but with many whitish, columnar eggs attached to its back. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway One of only 42 All American Roads in the Nation, the 500-mile route connects Lassen Volcanic and Crater Lake National Parks. The volcanic activity of the Cascade Mountain Range has created unique geological formations that can only be seen in this part of America. A white car on a mountain road with a large mountain in the background History of the Panoramic Lookout Project Most documentation of the panoramic lookout photos project, which began about 1930 to document areas seen from the lookout system, comes from the US Forest Service. The NPS project began in 1934. Lester Moe worked for the Forest Service taking photos in 1933 and 1934, and later worked for NPS. Several innovations came about from this project: the Osborne photo-recording transit and “special emulsion infra-red sensitive film” not affected by smoke and haze. sample of the panoramic lookout project Sandhill Crane Curious about the sandhill crane in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two large grayish-brown cranes stand together with wings outspread Researching the Riddle of Crater Lake's Secret Garden A microbiologist talks about her research in Crater Lake, the origins of curiosity, and what she hopes for young scientists. Microscopic moss leaf covered with microorganisms Anna's Hummingbird Curious about the Anna's hummingbird in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small, green hummingbird with narrow bill and iridescent rose-colored feathers on throat and crown. Parks, pikas, and physiological stress: Implications for long-term monitoring of an NPS climate-sensitive sentinel species Baseline values of physiological stress can be incorporated into monitoring plans for pikas, providing park managers with additional information related to the vulnerability of this climate-sensitive model species that occurs within a large number of western parks. American pika (Copyright Dick Orleans) Pollinators - Bumble bee Get the buzz on bumblebees! There are approximately 46 species of bumble bees (genus Bombus) native to North America and 250 species worldwide—all dependent on flowering plants. A bumblebee lands on a white flower Orange Sulphur Curious about the orange sulphur butterfly in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Yellowish-orange butterfly with dark band along the wing edges perches with wings open. NPS Launches Projects in Crater Lake and Yellowstone to Reduce Wildfire Risk and Protect Structures NPS Launches Projects in Crater Lake and Yellowstone to Reduce Wildfire Risk and Protect Structures. Piles created from fuels reduction project At Crater Lake National Park Great Gray Owl Curious about the great gray owl in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Large gray-checkered owl with outspread wings comes to land on a post. Ruffed Grouse Curious about the ruffed grouse in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Grouse with reddish brown and white mottling and streaking, a head crest and a dark tail band. Castle Crest Wildflower Trail Cultural Landscape Castle Crest Wildflower Trail is a 0.40-mile interpretive trail that loops around a meadow below Castle Crest Ridge. Originally built in 1929, the trail was created to provide visitor access to and interpretation of one of the most abundant wildflower displays in the park. The Castle Crest Wildflower Trail was not only connected to the early development of Crater Lake’s education program, it was also a local manifestation of a greater NPS educational movement. A meadow surrounded by forest. Rim Drive Historic District Cultural Landscape The period of significance for the Rim Drive Historic District is 1926 to 1941, reflecting the years of development when planning and design efforts were undertaken by the National Park Service and the Bureau of Public Roads. With work relief funding from the federal government, the road and its associated features were constructed to provide access to the area's unique scenic features while also blending into the area's natural character. A view from a rocky trail shows Rim Drive winding through peaks and subalpine meadows. Rim Village Cultural Landscape Rim Village is located on the southwestern edge the Crater Lake caldera. The landscape is a mixture of highly designed developed areas and natural areas, including large indigenous hemlock trees and the fragile landform of the caldera. The landscape is significant for the period 1927 through 1941 for its association with the American Park Movement and early NPS master planning. brown building surrounded by turf The Watchman Cultural Landscape The Watchman is a component cultural landscape of Rim Drive Historic District at Crater Lake National Park. The Watchman Observation Station and the Watchman Trail demonstrate Rustic architecture and Naturalistic landscape architectural styles commonly employed in park planning and development. The features were designed to support its use as a fire lookout, for visitor enjoyment and interpretation, and to emphasize the natural views and landscape characteristics. A steep rocky rim drops into the sharp blue of Crater Lake, seen from the lookout on Watchman Peak. It's a Wrap: Completing the Crater Lake Vegetation Map Dodging fires at Crater Lake National Park in the summer of 2017, the Klamath Network vegetation mapping crew gathered their last season of field data. The summer’s plots check the accuracy of the final map, setting the stage for its publication in June of 2018. Vegetation maps help us learn how park landscapes change over time, and help us identify unique or sensitive park habitats. The new map offers more detail and higher accuracy than any previously available to the park. Person outside, looking at a GPS and recording species data. Making Sense of Monitoring Data: Whitebark Pine Conditions in the Southern Cascades Klamath Network botanist, Sean Smith, has been monitoring whitebark pine conditions in two network parks since 2012. Jenell Jackson, the graduate student he worked with early on, recently coauthored a paper with Smith and other scientists in the journal <em>Forests</em> sharing what they’ve learned about whitebark pine. Their study aims to support park managers grappling with how best to protect this increasingly threatened tree in the southern Cascades. Close-up of tree bark covered in orange blisters. Series: Panoramic Project Shows How National Parks Change Over Time In the 1930s, panoramic photographs were taken from lookout points. Comparing these images to present-day photographs allows us to understand change over time. Viewing photographs of different eras in the national parks can give many insights on ecosystem processes, as well as simply change over time. The panoramic lookout photographs provide a window on the past and an opportunity to compare to the present with changes to landforms and land cover. Lester Moe documenting park landscapes in the 1930s Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Whitebark Pine - Featured Creature Curious about the whitebark pine? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Gray and white bird with black wings digs into a pine cone on the end of a pine branch. Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Scientist Profile: Andrew Ray, Ecologist Meet Andrew Ray, ecologist with the Greater Yellowstone Inventory & Monitoring Network! Andrew is fascinated by aquatic habitats and wetland plants. Learn about his favorite project studying the unique Crater Lake Manzama newt, and discover how he got to be where he is today. Scientist gestures to something in a fishing net as two people in NPS uniform observe. Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. Douglas's Squirrel Curious about the Douglas's squirrel in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Medium-sized squirrel with tawny belly, gray back, whitish eye ring, and tufts on ears, in a tree. Scientist Profile: Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, Biologist and I&M Program Manager Meet Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, ecologist and program manager for the Klamath Inventory & Monitoring Network! Discover how Alice followed her passion for wildlife and the outdoors to the National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring Program, and learn about her work studying bats. Biologist holds bat with gloved hands. Listening for Owls: A Multi-agency Collaboration to Preserve Spotted Owl Habitat Across the West For over 25 years, biologists from the National Park Service and several other agencies have collected spotted owl monitoring data to inform forest management that is guided by the multi-agency Northwest Forest Plan. Yet traditional field surveys for spotted owls have become less effective as their numbers have dwindled. Thus in 2021, the Northwest Forest Plan’s spotted owl monitoring design is transitioning to remote acoustic monitoring (also known as passive monitoring). Audio recording unit, with microphones on either side, mounted on a tree trunk. A Century Later: Scientists Study the Impact of Crayfish Introduction at Crater Lake National Park Over a century ago, crayfish were introduced into pristine Crater Lake. Now, they have spread to 95% of the shoreline. Scientific studies show an influence from climate change: warmer water allows more crayfish to survive winter, while longer summers give crayfish more time to spread when water is warm. The studies also show that introduced crayfish reduce the biomass of bottom dwelling insects relied upon by endemic Mazama newts, which are poised to disappear as a result. Person snorkeling, looking between large rocks. The Northwestern Bat Hub: Banding Together for Bat Monitoring Across the West The first detection of white-nose syndrome in the American West in 2016 highlighted an urgent need to better understand the distribution and ecology of around twenty species of bats in Western states. To do this, ecologists in several Inventory & Monitoring Networks and National Parks joined with the USGS and ten other university and agency partners to expand the North American Bat Monitoring Program to sites across the West and develop the Northwestern Bat Hub. Close-up of a western mastiff bat in a gloved hand. Did You Know We Never Hire Women? In 1920, as Ranger Isabel Bassett Wasson arrived at Yellowstone, Dr. Harold C. Bryant and Dr. Loye Holmes Miller launched the new NPS education program with the Free Nature Guide Service at Yosemite National Park. Female Ranger talks to a crowd The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Bigleaf Maple Curious about the bigleaf maple in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Lush ferns and mosses grow on the trunk of a large maple tree. Checking Crater Lake's Vital Signs In 2010, the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called "vital signs," in Crater Lake and nearby parks. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate. Results from monitoring these vital signs support park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Division and its work in Crater Lake National Park. Cliff and yellow shrubbery above a large blue lake. Top Ten Tips for Visiting in Summer Crater Lake National Park crowns of conifer tress frame Crater Lake Vaux's Swift Curious about the Vaux's swift in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A small, pale brown, cigar-shaped bird with narrow, pointed wings, in flight. Coast Douglas-fir Curious about Douglas-fir in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Six people in front of a very large Douglas-fir at Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve. Pacific Madrone Curious about Pacific madrone in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Close up Pacific madrone bark Oregon Grape Curious about Oregon grape in southern Oregon? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Bright green, shiny leaves of a tall Oregon grape with a cluster of round blue-black berries. Tree Lungwort Curious about tree lungwort in northern California and southern Oregon? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Close of of tree lungwort's upper and lower surfaces American Black Bear Curious about the American black bear in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Black-colored black bear with a dandelion in its mouth. Roosevelt Elk Curious about the Roosevelt elk in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two bull elk with antlers just beginning to grow face each other. Volcanic Processes—Lahars Lahars are volcanic mudflows and are among the most destructive of volcanic phenomena. Lahars present significant geohazards since they can travel great distances down river valleys and impact population centers away from the immediate area of a volcano. wide river valley filled with sediment and snowy peaks in the distance Ultra-Plinian Eruptions These caldera-forming eruptions are the largest of all volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have higher eruption rates that form higher eruption columns and produce widespread pyroclastic flows. View overlooking extensive flat ground covered with trees and meadows The Klamath Kaleidoscope: Fall-Winter 2021 In this issue of the Klamath Kaleidoscope, we share news of the newly published geologic type section inventory of Klamath Network parks, the latest results from white-nose syndrome monitoring in bats, our new data workflow system, updates from 2021 vital signs monitoring, and recent publications. We also highlight news about Klamath Network people, including Addis Gonzalez, Sean Mohren, Sonya Daw, Jennifer Chenoweth, and Elizabeth Raynal. Kaleidoscope image of a flower and other natural scenes. Plinian Eruptions Plinian eruptions are more intense than Sub-Plinean eruptions. Eruption columns may extend into the stratosphere and spread out in an umbrella shape and produce widespread ash deposits. Pyroclastic flows and lahars also occur during these eruptions. black and white photo May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption Volcanic Craters Different types of volcanoes have craters with different characteristics. Cinder cones, maars, tuff rings, composite volcanoes, and some domes have craters. cinder cone crater Vents Volcanic vents are openings at the Earth's surface where magma and tephra erupt or volcanic gases are emitted. Vents occur in several different volcanic settings in the parks. erupting lava Crater Lakes Crater lakes are volcanic lakes found in craters and calderas. crater lake and snowy rim Volcanic Processes—Landslides [Site Under Development] landslide scar on a vegetated slope Sugar Pine Curious about the sugar pine tree in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Long brown pine cone. Magmatic Eruptions Magmatic eruptions include fresh lava or tephra from a magma source. Magmatic eruptions range from quiet effusions of lava to extremely explosive eruptions that can blow apart mountains and send ash clouds around the globe. volcanic eruption with glowing lava seen at night Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Composite Volcanoes (Stratovolcanoes) Composite volcanoes are made up of both lava flows and pyroclastic deposits and usually experience multiple eruptions over long periods of time. Mount Rainier is a composite volcano. photo of a snow covered volcanic peak Volcanic Domes Lava domes are steep-sided rounded accumulations of highly viscous silicic lava over a vent. Some domes are part of composite volcanoes, but large ones can make up their own volcanoes. Lassen Peak is a dome. photo of a rounded hill of blocky rock Changing Attitudes Most women with disabilities hired by the National Park Service (NPS) in the 1970s and early 1980s had temporary jobs. Some built long-term careers with the bureau. Starting before the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, these women experienced the opportunities and changes the law brought. It was their hard work and dedication to the NPS mission, however, that continued to change attitudes and educate coworkers and visitors alike. Ranger Shirley Beccue in her wheelchair and NPS uniform and flat hat looks out over the Everglades. Merlin Curious about the merlin in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small, perched falcon with brown back, brown streaked breast, dark eyes and slight white eyebrow. Elizabeth L. Horn For nearly six decades Elizabeth L. Horn, a plant ecologist, has been connected to Crater Lake National Park. She began what she called her “long love affair with this fascinating landscape” during the 1960s. Smiling older woman with white hair, white shirt and pink jacket in front of green trees. Shield Volcanoes Shield volcanoes are typically very large volcanoes with very gentle slopes made up of basaltic lava flows. Mauna Loa and Kilauea in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are shield volcanoes. diagram of a shield volcano with lava features Common Snowberry Curious about the common snowberry in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Round pinkish-white berries grow along a slender stem. Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Series: Volcanic Features Volcanoes vary greatly in size and shape. Volcanoes also may have a variety of other features, which in turn, have a great range in diversity of form, size, shape, and permanence. Many volcanoes have craters at their summits and/or at the location of other vents. Some craters contain water lakes. Lakes of molten or solidified lava may exist on some volcanoes. Fumaroles and other geothermal features are a product of heat from magma reservoirs and volcanic gases. photo of a lava lake in a summit crater

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