"Cuyahoga Valley National Park" by NPS / Victoria Stauffenberg , public domain

Cuyahoga Valley

National Park - Ohio

Cuyahoga Valley National Park preserves and reclaims the rural landscape along the Cuyahoga River between Akron and Cleveland in Northeast Ohio. Cuyahoga Valley is the only national park in the state of Ohio and one of three in the Great Lakes Basin, with Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior and Indiana Dunes National Park bordering Lake Michigan. Cuyahoga Valley is also unusual among several other national parks in America, being adjacent to two large urban areas and including a dense road network, small towns, and private attractions.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Cuyahoga Valley National Park (NP) in Ohio. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cuyahoga Valley - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Cuyahoga Valley National Park (NP) in Ohio. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/cuva/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuyahoga_Valley_National_Park Cuyahoga Valley National Park preserves and reclaims the rural landscape along the Cuyahoga River between Akron and Cleveland in Northeast Ohio. Cuyahoga Valley is the only national park in the state of Ohio and one of three in the Great Lakes Basin, with Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior and Indiana Dunes National Park bordering Lake Michigan. Cuyahoga Valley is also unusual among several other national parks in America, being adjacent to two large urban areas and including a dense road network, small towns, and private attractions. Though a short distance from the urban areas of Cleveland and Akron, Cuyahoga Valley National Park seems worlds away. The park is a refuge for native plants and wildlife, and provides routes of discovery for visitors. The winding Cuyahoga River gives way to deep forests, rolling hills, and open farmlands. Walk or ride the Towpath Trail to follow the historic route of the Ohio & Erie Canal. Plane Cleveland Hopkins International Airport and Akron-Canton Regional Airport offer many daily flights to the area. Car rentals are available at both airports. Bus & Train Bus stations are located in downtown Cleveland and Akron. The Amtrak station is in downtown Cleveland. Car The park is easily accessible by car from all directions. A good place to start your visit is at Boston Mill Visitor Center located at 6947 Riverview Road, Peninsula, Ohio 44264. (41° 15'45.3" N) (81° 33'37.3" W). Boston Mill Visitor Center Start your visit to Cuyahoga Valley National Park at Boston Mill Visitor Center. Meet park staff, get questions answered, and learn about the park and places to visit. The visitor center is open daily from 9:30 am to 5 pm, with limited access. For the summer season, additional staff are available outside the visitor center to assist with trip planning, weather permitting. The Boston Mill Visitor Center is located on the corner of Riverview Road and Boston Mills Road, two and a half miles north of the town of Peninsula, OH. Canal Exploration Center Discover the Ohio & Erie Canal in the storied Canal Exploration Center that was once used as a tavern, a general store, a residence, and a park visitor center. Find out how the canal shaped the nation through in-depth, interactive Canal Era exhibits for children and adults. Located at the north end of Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Canal Exploration Center is located at the intersection of Canal and Hillside Roads. Hunt House Hunt House offers child-friendly nature exhibits, a rest area along the Towpath Trail, and information about nearby attractions. Hunt House is open daily during the summer from Memorial day to Labor Day. Our Spring operations are Saturdays and Sundays from April 1st to Memorial Day. The Hunt House is closed annually for Fall and Winter from Labor Day until April. Located toward the southern end of the park, Hunt House is located along the Towpath Trail on Bolanz Road between Riverview and Akron Peninsula Roads. Stanford Campsites For adventurous visitors looking for an overnight camping experience, check out the park’s five sites along the Stanford Trail (behind Stanford House). Backcountry and Towpath Trail hikers, families, and scout troops can take a load off for the evening and enjoy Cuyahoga Valley National Park under the stars. Kayakers on the Cuyahoga River People in bright orange kayaks paddle around a bend in a river, past green trees and a rocky shore. A group of kayaks passing a rocky beach on the Cuyahoga River in summer. The Ledges Overlook in Fall Two people stand at the edge of a gray rock cliff; in the distance, sunset and trees in fall colors. Visitors taking in the view at the Ledges Overlook in fall. The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad A yellow-and-red engine with number 6777 leads a passenger train along tracks through green trees. CVSR Engine 6777 motors down the tracks. Brandywine Falls Viewed from the Upper Boardwalk Viewed from above, people stand on a platform near frothy white water falling over a rocky ledge. Brandywine Falls viewed from the upper boardwalk. Lock 38 and Canal Exploration Center Visitors line the concrete edge of a canal lock filled with water, in front of a white building. Visitors watch a lock demonstration at Canal Exploration Center. 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Celebrate 50 years of the NPS Volunteer-in-Parks Program, and learn about the contributions of the volunteer recipients of the 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service, for work performed in fiscal year 2019. a volunteer wearing a red life vest walks towards you with a smile, lifting a canoe paddle 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor June: A Month of Milestones The times are a changin’, and there’s no better time to honor those moments of change than in June. Over the course of America’s history, the month of June is filled with cultural changes, and some seasonal ones too. So just before the season changes and summer begins, take some time to visit these parks that commemorate extraordinary moments. Painting of suffragist on a horse 2012 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2012, seven rangers were awarded the national and region Freeman Tilden Awards for innovative and exciting interpretive programs. Learn their stories and more about their award-winning programs. Renee Albertoli 2011 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Discover the innovative and exciting programs of the recipients of the national and regional 2011 Freeman Tilden Awards for excellence in interpretation. LIza Stearns Cuyahoga Valley Railway Cultural Landscape By the 1850s, as the nation's borders expanded and the population exploded, railroads began to replace canals and riverboats as the way of moving people and goods more efficiently. The railway evolved into a part of everyday life for residents throughout Ohio's Cuyahoga Valley. The Cuyahoga Valley Railway served as the primary source of rail transportation for the Valley from 1871 to 1915, eventually replaced by alternative methods of shipping and passenger transportation. Smoke rises from a train as it rolls down tracks through a leafy green landscape. The Sounds of Spring When the weather warms, national parks across the country rouse from winter’s sleep. The sounds you hear in parks reflect this seasonal change. They contribute to the unique soundscape of these special places, and are among the resources that the National Park Service protects. Sandhill cranes dance in a courtship ritual in flooded grasslands at Great Sand Dunes NP. How a National Park Helps the Cuyahoga Recover In 2007, something remarkable happened in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. A young bald eagle took flight from its nest along the Cuyahoga River. It was the first successful nest ever recorded in Cuyahoga Valley. Cuyahoga Valley National Park is part of the ongoing story of renewal for the Cuyahoga River and the wildlife that depends on it. An eagle with brown wings outstretched soars over green tree tops. Junior Ranger, Jr. Explores Bluebirds Imagine, make, move and explore the world of bluebirds! This wildlife activity page is part of a series for ages 3-6. A bird with a blue head, rusty breast and white belly sits on a tree branch with dried red berries Observing Bald Eagles in Cuyahoga Valley In 2006, bald eagles returned to Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Read more to learn how to identify eagles and their behaviors, as well as what you can do to make sure you observe them appropriately when you visit. An eagle fledgling, hatched in 2020, flaps its wings from its nest. Photographing Wildlife From Your Car Encounters with wildlife are always a thrilling experience while exploring a natural area. Perhaps you bring a camera along in the hopes of capturing a shareable memory. So how do you get a good picture? Get pro tips from a savvy nature photographer. Chestnut-sided warbler on a branch. Pollinators - Monarch butterfly More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers, yet one of the greatest threats to Monarch populations is loss of habitat. A Monarch clings to an orange flower Wetland Bird Study at Cuyahoga Valley National Park This study provides baseline information about birds inhabiting wetland areas in Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio. Yellow Warblers at Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Invasive, Non-native Plant Monitoring at Cuyahoga Valley National Park In this study, we found 61 non-native, invasive plants. These are plants that have not historically grown in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Human activity brought these plants to the park from other locations, including other continents. Garlic Mustard along a stream at Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Amphibian Study at Cuyahoga Valley National Park If you remember the 1980’s arcade game “Frogger”, the goal was to move your frog through busy traffic across a road. The game reflected real life – frogs and other animals are challenged to deal with roads and traffic. Frog near a road at Cuyahoga Valley National Park National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map The Pittengers' Conservation Legacy at Wetmore On their successful horse farm, Tress and Peggy Pittenger used conservation methods to care for the land. The national park and its partners and volunteers are carrying on this tradition by doing a major habitat restoration project along the Wetmore Trail. A woman stands touching a brown horse beside a metal water trough, a wooden fence behind them. The Cuyahoga River Recovers Once famous for being polluted and catching fire, the Cuyahoga River is making a comeback. Industries and cities discharge far fewer toxins into the river, and partners along the river, including Cuyahoga Valley National Park, are removing obsolete dams to improve oxygen levels and fish movement. People are enjoying the return of nesting bald eagles and other wildlife as well as new recreational opportunities along the Cuyahoga River Water Trail. A blue-and-white boat floats on the river; a large white 3-D sign reads Jaite, a Paper Mill and Company Town The Jaite Mill brought work, family, and community together. Its stories of industrialization, community, growth, and decline are a part of the larger story of Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Aerial view of a large manufacturing facility next to a winding river, surrounded by forests. Junior Ranger: Interview an Elder All stories begin with people and every person has a story. Practice being a historian by recording an "oral history". Call a friend or relative and ask them questions to learn about the past. An cartoon illustration of two raccoons, each holding a smartphone and connected by a dotted line Junior Ranger, Jr. Explores Hawks Imagine, make, move and explore the world of hawks! This wildlife activity page is part of a series for ages 3-6. A rusty, white-and-brown hawk perches near the tip of a broken, dead tree branch Junior Ranger, Jr. Explores Hummingbirds Imagine, make, move and explore the world of hummingbirds! This wildlife activity page is part of a series for ages 3-6. A photo of a green, iridescent hummingbird in profile, perched on a branch and facing to the left Junior Ranger, Jr. Explores Creepers Imagine, make, move and explore the world of creepers! This wildlife activity page is part of a series for ages 3-6. a creeper climbs the bark of a tree toward a clump of brown, frozen leaves The Cuyahoga, a National Heritage River The Cuyahoga River has kept itself on history’s pages. It has been a transportation route; a boundary; a birthplace for oil, rubber and modern steel industries; a power source; and a dumping place. The Cuyahoga’s role in the movement to protect America’s waterways was one reason for the establishment of Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which now protects 22 miles of the river and thousands of acres of its watershed. A black-and-white photo of industrial areas along the shores and boats in the river Outside Science (inside parks): Water Quality in Cuyahoga Valley Follow Mosaics in Science interns as they test water quality on the Cuyahoga River. A brown river flows between two tree-covered banks. Bald Eagles Return to Cuyahoga Valley Bald eagle populations have been steadily increasing throughout the country in recent years. The Cuyahoga Valley, with expansive, secluded wooded wetlands and rebounding fish populations, has become an ideal place for eagles to feed and nest. In 2006, bald eagles returned and built a nest, the first recorded in the valley in modern times. Though unsuccessful that first year, the breeding eagles have returned in subsequent years and more than a dozen eaglets have fledged. A brown immature eagle stands upright on a diagonal, barkless tree branch. Outside Science (inside parks): Bees, Butterflies, and Students in Cuyahoga Valley National Park Bees, butterflies, and students star in this episode of Outside Science (inside parks). Follow our crew to Cuyahoga Valley National Park to see how young scientists are making a difference for pollinators. A student holds a clear plastic container with a yellow lid, containing a bee. Junior Ranger, Jr. Explores Orioles Imagine, make, move and explore the world of orioles! This wildlife activity page is part of a series for ages 3-6. A bird with a black head and wings and bright orange belly stands on a leafy tree branch Junior Ranger, Jr. Explores Blackbirds Imagine, make, move and explore the world of red-winged blackbirds! This wildlife activity page is part of a series for ages 3-6. A red-winged blackbird perched at the end of a dead log Discover the Paleoindian People Ohio’s first people followed big game as the last glaciers retreated. A family of six stretch fresh caribou hides. Hides have been used for clothing and shelter. Timeline of American Indian Cultures American Indians from different cultures have made Northeast Ohio home for 13,000 years. This timeline is an overview of the major periods. Bronze statue of bare-chested man with long hair carrying a canoe over his head. Preserving the Station Road Bridge The historic Station Road Bridge spans the Cuyahoga in Brecksville. In 2020-2021 it will get a $1,340,000 makeover. View down a rusting white metal truss bridge with a wooden floor spanning a muddy river. Junior Ranger: Past Peoples Challenge Hundreds of generations of prehistoric American Indians lived in the Cuyahoga Valley long before it became a national park. Practice gathering clues and solving puzzles and learn about how archeologists piece together the story of how these past peoples lived. Eight pottery fragments with different shapes and patterns, arranged on a green background. Brian Redmond Lectures on the "Archeology of American Indians" Listen to a lecture by Dr. Brian Redmond of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History examining the pre-contact archeology of Northeast Ohio. Headshot of a smiling man with salt-and-pepper hair and beard wearing a forest green dress shirt. Discover the Archaic People The Archaic period was the longest, lasting about 8,000 years, but we know the least about these native people. A hunter uses an atlatl to throw a spear toward a deer running by a river. Marking 50th Earth Day in View of the Pandemic With the Covid-19 pandemic, parks are one of the few places where people in Ohio can go. People have flocked to Cuyahoga Valley National Park, and crowding has emerged as an issue. Another one of these moments occurred in 1970 when thousands of environmental events took place on the first Earth Day. April 22 is Earth Day’s 50th anniversary. Read more about the public response to these points in time. Junk cars seen beneath the trees. Honoring Harriet Keeler: Teacher, Author, Citizen The 300 acres that were set aside in the 1920s to honor Harriet Keeler became one of the first parklands preserved in Cuyahoga Valley and remains one of the most biologically diverse. Close-up of a bronze plaque on an upright boulder. Kendall Lake Through the Years When you admire a place with natural beauty, it is easy to imagine that it has always looked the same. It is also easy to think that nature alone shaped the scenery. However, often neither is the case. Change is the only constant in the landscape, and people are part of the story of change. The story of Kendall Lake reflects the interplay of nature and people through the years. A black-and-white photo shows dozens of people sitting on a sandy beach and swimming in the lake. Exploring Black History in Cuyahoga Valley Connections between African American history and Cuyahoga Valley National Park are reflected in the stories of Carl B. Stokes, Jane Edna Hunter, John Malvin, and Lewis Clarke. A photo of 13 African American girls sitting in the grass in front of a row of canvas tents. Celebrating the 19th Amendment On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment became an official part of the US Constitution. The amendment made it possible for women to vote because it prohibited states and the federal government from denying access to the ballot box based on sex. While the amendment did not guarantee the vote for women, is was an important milestone in women’s equality. Explore the stories of a few important women connected to three National Park sites in northeast Ohio. Women in early 1900s attire smile holding a banner which reads, Damming the Cuyahoga in Brecksville The Brecksville Diversion Dam in Cuyahoga Valley National Park was a remnant of the area’s industrial and transportation history. Its demolition in 2020 is a major milestone in the Cuyahoga River’s recovery. An aerial photo of a muddy river as it splits to flow over a dam and be diverted into a canal. The 1969 Cuyahoga River Fire Stories about the 1969 Cuyahoga River fire often combine fact and myth. People generally agree about what occurred on and immediately after June 22, 1969. Myth enters the stories when people describe the fire as a primary cause of major milestones in the environmental movement. Regardless, the Cuyahoga River fire has become a symbol of water pollution and the environmental movement. Today, we celebrate this symbolism, not just the facts of the story. Two firefighters pump water from their boat on the water, up onto a burnt railroad bridge Steven Moss: Memories of Fish and Wildlife Changes Read and listen to experienced fisherman Steven Moss, who grew up fishing in Cuyahoga River. He talks about his youth growing up around Cuyahoga Valley and explains how the health of the Cuyahoga River has changed over the past few decades. Blurry black and white photo of two children standing on boulders in a river. Carl B. Stokes and the 1969 River Fire In 1969, the Cuyahoga River caught on fire in Cleveland just a few miles north of Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Carl B. Stokes was mayor of Cleveland. In 1967, he had become the first elected African American mayor of a major US city. Stokes is a hero in the river fire story. The fire is an icon of the environmental movement. Stokes’ response to the fire helped it gain this status. Mayor Carl B. Stokes stands in front of a sewer outflow, surrounded by reporters in suits. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] river and trees Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains The Cuyahoga River: Once on Fire, Now A Recreation Destination Just 50 years ago, the Cuyahoga River was heavily polluted and set ablaze. Ready to reclaim their waterway, a coalition of community members, organizations and the National Park Service collaborated to make the river a designated water trail and develop a structure to manage the waterway. Today, as Ohio's 13th water trail, the river is accessible to wildlife and recreationists while boosting economic development in surrounding communities. A top view of paddlers on the Cuyahoga River. Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Restoring Butterfly Habitat at Terra Vista Citizen scientists monitoring butterflies at the Terra Vista Natural Study Area provide important data for the habitat restoration team. Yellow butterfly with a lime green eye hangs on a stalk with many small, white flowers. History of the Ohio & Erie Canal The Ohio & Erie Canal once traveled through the Cuyahoga Valley on its way to connecting the Ohio River with Lake Erie. Learn more about the history of this human-made waterway, now part of a national heritage area. Black and white photo of a family standing and sitting on a white canal boat on the water. Paul Murphy Remembers the 1913 Flood Later in life, Paul Ervin Murphy wrote a firsthand account of his family’s escape during the Great Flood of 1913. They lived on a small Cuyahoga Valley farm by Lock 35, south of Station Road Bridge. Black and white photo of raging floodwaters engulfing several trees, misty buildings in background. Great Blue Herons in Cuyahoga Valley Learn more about Great Blue Herons in the Cuyahoga Valley. A long-necked great blue heron wades through standing water and vegetation. The Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps at Cuyahoga Valley The Civilian Conservation Corps changed the landscape of the Cuyahoga Valley. CCC “boys” created parks out of farm-worn land, planting trees and adding amenities in what is now the Virginia Kendall unit of Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Learn more about the local legacy of this depression-era work program. Black and white photo: 70-100 uniformed young men stand and squat in five rows for a group photo. Learn about Geology: Rocks, Ice, and River The terrain of Cuyahoga Valley National Park is diverse and often rugged. River terraces, steep valley walls, meandering streams, ravines, waterfalls, and rock ledges all give texture to the valley. The geologic evidence found in these features tells of seas, glaciers, and rivers that have all left an imprint on the land. Long exposure photo shows clear water cascading over yellow-gray bedrock in a stream. History of the Valley Railway Since the 1830s rail travel has shaped the sights, sounds, and experiences of the nation. In 1880 Valley Railway Company brought railroading to the Cuyahoga Valley, forever changing the area and those who called it home. Memories continue to be built everyday as passengers climb aboard Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad to experience historic rail travel through Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Black and white photo of a man standing in front of a train depot with a "Boston Mill" sign. Removing Toxins at Krejci Dump The Krejci Dump operated as a salvage yard and waste disposal facility from 1948 to 1980. At the time, dumps were largely unregulated. Toxic materials were buried in unlined pits and allowed to seep unchecked into the environment. Learn about the decades-long effort to investigate and clean up contamination at this site in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Four brown, rusted barrels, some leaking a blue-gray substance onto the leaf-covered ground. The Story of the Beaver Marsh The Beaver Marsh is among the most diverse natural communities in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. But this wasn’t always the case. The area had been a farm and later a junkyard, which was cleaned up by a community effort. Explore the history of the marsh and learn why it remains an important ecosystem in the national park. Gray tree trunks rise from a wetland reflecting blue sky; green lily pads float on the surface. Top Ten Tips for Visiting Cuyahoga Valley National Park Learn to plan like a park ranger by reading our top ten tips for visiting Cuyahoga Valley National Park. A dozen people walk and bike along a wooden boardwalk that crosses over a wetland. Cuyahoga Valley's Ties to the Underground Railroad Not an actual train, the Underground Railroad was a system of secret routes fanning away in all directions from slave states. Cuyahoga Valley National Park interprets Ohio’s Underground Railroad heritage because a centerpiece of our park, the Ohio & Erie Canal, was a likely route. Painting of about 15 people, Black and White, moving furniture and belongings off of a wagon. Monarchs on the Move in Cuyahoga Valley It takes monarchs three or four generations to migrate from their overwintering grounds in central Mexico to their breeding habitat in the northern United States and Canada during the spring and summer. The last generation makes the entire return journey south to Mexico during the fall. Cuyahoga Valley National Park is part of a patchwork of vital habitats across North America supporting these intrepid travelers. A monarch butterfly sits on the dome-shaped, pink crown of a milkweed plant in bloom. The Ohio & Erie Canal: Catalyst of Economic Development for Ohio (Teaching with Historic Places) Use this lesson to teach about the creation of the Ohio & Erie Canal. An old map shows the route of the Erie Canal; from a blue Lake Erie east across New York. Finding Moses Cleaveland Trees in Cuyahoga Valley For Cleveland’s 225th anniversary, park staff tracked down the last Moses Cleaveland Tree living in Cuyahoga Valley. A man smiles and raises his arms as he poses inside the hollow trunk of a massive tree. National Park Service Careers: Interpretation, Education, and Visitor Services National Park Service employees perform various kinds of work at hundreds of locations across the country. Learn more about the work of rangers and other employees in the fields of Interpretation, Education, and Visitor Services. These employees generally work with the public, answer visitor questions, and lead programs. A uniformed ranger crouches next two young Black girls holding binoculars and points to the sky. Can the Cuyahoga River Support Rare Wildlife? Teams of scientists from several agencies are studying whether the Cuyahoga River is healthy enough to support freshwater mussels and lake sturgeon. These long-lived animals are rare in Ohio due to major changes in our waterways and lakes. Three people kneeling in water. In their hands are white & yellow mesh bags, they fill with mussels. National Park Service Careers: Resource Management National Park Service employees perform various kinds of work at hundreds of locations across the country. Learn more about the rangers and other staff who work in the fields of Natural and Cultural Resource Management. These employees generally study and monitor the resources of the parks. A uniformed female ranger and two men smile and hold up fish while standing in a boat on the water. National Park Service Careers: Maintenance National Park Service employees perform various kinds of work at hundreds of locations across the country. Learn more about the work of rangers and other employees who work in Maintenance-related fields. These employees generally build, repair, and improve park infrastructure and facilities. A man wearing a bright-yellow sweatshirt blows leaves off a gray trail with a backpack blower. National Park Service Careers: Visitor and Resource Protection National Park Service employees perform various kinds of work at hundreds of locations across the country. Learn more about the rangers and other staff who work in Visitor and Resource Protection. These employees generally work to keep the parks and their visitors safe. Two uniformed rangers stand together looking down at maps and documents in their hands. Bird Photography Pro Tips Make your wildlife photos sing with these pro tips from nature photographer and author Jim Roetzel. A closeup of a chickadee perched on a branch with sprays of red berries. It looks away to the right.

also available

National Parks
USFS NW