"Devils Postpile" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Devils Postpile

National Monument - California

Devils Postpile National Monument is located near Mammoth Mountain in eastern California. The national monument protects Devil's Postpile, an unusual rock formation of columnar basalt.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Devils Postpile National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Devils Postpile - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Devils Postpile National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Mammoth area in Inyo National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Inyo MVUM - Mammoth 2018

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Mammoth area in Inyo National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Mariposa in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Mariposa - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Mariposa in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/depo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devils_Postpile_National_Monument Devils Postpile National Monument is located near Mammoth Mountain in eastern California. The national monument protects Devil's Postpile, an unusual rock formation of columnar basalt. Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world's finest examples of columnar basalt. Its' columns tower up to 60 feet and display a striking symmetry. Shuttle Bus: Most visitors must park at the Mammoth Mountain Ski Area and use the mandatory shuttle. The shuttle bus operates from mid-June through the Wednesday after Labor Day. By car: From U.S. Highway 395, drive 10 miles west on S.R. 203 to Minaret Vista and then another 8 miles on a paved, steep mountain road. Please note that this road is single lane for approximately 3 miles. By plane: The closest commercial airport is the Mammoth Lakes/Yosemite Airport (MMH), located on U.S. Highway 395. Devils Postpile Ranger Station The Devils Postpile Ranger Station is open daily from 9 am - 5 pm during the operating season which is typically mid-June to mid-October. Rangers can help you plan your adventure at Devils Postpile. The ranger station is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its association with changes in national park planning and development from the late 1930s to the start of World War II in 1941. The simple two-room cabin was constructed in 1941 from lumber salvaged from the demolished Sentinel Hotel. Shuttle Bus: Most visitors must park at the Mammoth Mountain Ski Area and use the mandatory shuttle. The shuttle bus operates from mid-June through the Wednesday after Labor Day. By car: From U.S. Highway 395, drive 10 miles west on S.R. 203 to Minaret Vista and then another 8 miles on a paved, steep mountain road. Please note that this road is single lane for approximately 3 miles. By plane: The closest commercial airport is the Mammoth Lakes/Yosemite Airport (MMH), located on U.S. Highway 395. Devils Postpile Formation The Devils Postpile basalt formation resembles tall columns. Devils Postpile formation is one of many features to see at Devils Postpile National Monument. Hexagonal Fractures at the top of Devils Postpile Hexagonal fractures that make up the columns at the postpile with glacial polish Part of the popular loop trail will take you to this unique geologic formation. Rainbow Falls Waterfall with faint rainbow Rainbow Falls Soda Springs Meadow and San Joaquin River Soda Springs Meadow and San Joaquin River Soda Springs Meadow and San Joaquin River River Hydrology Monitoring The Sierra Nevada national parks contain the headwaters of seven major watersheds, and the gradual spring melt of the winter snowpack provides water to park ecosystems as well as rural and urban areas throughout California. Learn more about the Sierra Nevada Network river hydrology project, monitoring the quantity and timing of streamflow in a subset of major rivers. Two women wearing raincoats and waders in the middle of a river taking measurements of flow levels. Monitoring Wetlands Ecological Integrity Wetlands occupy less than 10 percent of the Sierra Nevada, but they are habitat for a large diversity of plants and animals. They provide nesting and foraging habitat for birds, play an important role in the life cycle of many invertebrate and amphibian species, and are a rich source of food for small mammals and bears. They store nutrients and sediment and control flooding. Learn more about monitoring of plant communities, groundwater dynamics, and macroinvertebrates. Biologists examine a soil profile in a meadow to evaluate the type of wetland. Monitoring Birds in Sierra Nevada Network Parks More than 60 percent of the vertebrate species in Sierra Nevada Network parks are birds. These parks provide critical breeding, stopover, and wintering habitats for birds, but there are numerous stressors such as climate change and habitat loss that cause declines in some bird populations. Learn more about why birds are good indicators of ecosystem change and how they are being monitored. Western Tanager perched on a tree branch What’s Blooming in the Cold Air Pool? Climate scientists are investigating the potential of cold air pools—temperature inversions where cold, dense air concentrates in areas of high topographic variation—to maintain refugia that are buffered from climate change and enable the persistence of valued resources. Learn about 2017 FPL intern Sophia Chau's experience at Devils Postpile National Monument. Researcher beside a mountain stream NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Devils Postpile National Monument, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. devils postpile Sam Zuckerman Sam Zuckerman worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2017, and while he enjoyed the field work, this experience helped him decide he wanted to get involved with all the steps of carrying out a research project. He is pursuing a PhD in Natural Resources at the University of New Hampshire, where his research focuses on tree responses to drought in northeastern forests. Click on the article title to learn more. Field biologist uses meter tape to set up a forest monitoring plot in foxtail pine stand. Vladimir Kovalenko Vladimir (Vlad) Kovalenko worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2015 and 2016, and this work inspired him to go on to graduate school at the University of Montana in 2020. He is pursuing a Master's Degree in Systems Ecology, and his research will focus on Clark's Nutcracker ecology in the whitebark pine ecosystem in Glacier National Park. Click on the title of this article to learn more. Four scientists wearing backpacks with a scenic view of Sierra Nevada mountains in background. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Geologic Type Section Inventory for Sierra Nevada Network Parks A recent NPS Geological Resources Division report for Sierra Nevada Network parks highlights geologic features (or “stratotypes”) of parks that serve as the standard for identifying geologic units. Stratotypes are important because they store knowledge, represent important comparative sites where past knowledge can be built up or re-examined, and can serve as teaching sites for students. Learn more about Sierra Nevada geology and the stratotypes that help characterize it. View of sheer cliffs on northeast side of Mount Whitney, Sequoia National Park. Genny Smith Genny Smith worked tirelessly to protect the High Sierra Nevada’s natural beauty. She was a pioneering environmental activist and author who raised public awareness and organized multiple campaigns toward that end. Woman sits on rocks in front of mountains Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Maria Martina Labayon Aguirre The image of the solitary Basque sheepherder passing through the Sierra Nevada presents only a partial picture of the complex social, economic, and family ties that bound the Basque community in California. While the men literally left their mark on the land through the drawings and glyphs they carved in what is now Devils Postpile National Monument, Basque women left their mark by providing cultural and social gathering sites for their communities. 10 people stand in front of 2-story Spanish style hotel. Sign on central door reads

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming