"Devils Postpile" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Devils Postpile

National Monument - California

Devils Postpile National Monument is located near Mammoth Mountain in eastern California. The national monument protects Devil's Postpile, an unusual rock formation of columnar basalt.

maps

Official visitor map of Devils Postpile National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Devils Postpile - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Devils Postpile National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Mammoth area in Inyo National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Inyo MVUM - Mammoth 2018

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Mammoth area in Inyo National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/depo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devils_Postpile_National_Monument Devils Postpile National Monument is located near Mammoth Mountain in eastern California. The national monument protects Devil's Postpile, an unusual rock formation of columnar basalt. Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world's finest examples of columnar basalt. Its' columns tower up to 60 feet and display a striking symmetry. Shuttle Bus: Most visitors must park at the Mammoth Mountain Ski Area and use the mandatory shuttle. The shuttle bus operates from mid-June through the Wednesday after Labor Day. By car: From U.S. Highway 395, drive 10 miles west on S.R. 203 to Minaret Vista and then another 8 miles on a paved, steep mountain road. Please note that this road is single lane for approximately 3 miles. By plane: The closest commercial airport is the Mammoth Lakes/Yosemite Airport (MMH), located on U.S. Highway 395. Devils Postpile Ranger Station The Devils Postpile Ranger Station is open daily from 9 am - 5 pm during the operating season which is typically mid-June to mid-October. Rangers can help you plan your adventure at Devils Postpile. The ranger station is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its association with changes in national park planning and development from the late 1930s to the start of World War II in 1941. The simple two-room cabin was constructed in 1941 from lumber salvaged from the demolished Sentinel Hotel. Shuttle Bus: Most visitors must park at the Mammoth Mountain Ski Area and use the mandatory shuttle. The shuttle bus operates from mid-June through the Wednesday after Labor Day. By car: From U.S. Highway 395, drive 10 miles west on S.R. 203 to Minaret Vista and then another 8 miles on a paved, steep mountain road. Please note that this road is single lane for approximately 3 miles. By plane: The closest commercial airport is the Mammoth Lakes/Yosemite Airport (MMH), located on U.S. Highway 395. Devils Postpile Formation The Devils Postpile basalt formation resembles tall columns. Devils Postpile formation is one of many features to see at Devils Postpile National Monument. Hexagonal Fractures at the top of Devils Postpile Hexagonal fractures that make up the columns at the postpile with glacial polish Part of the popular loop trail will take you to this unique geologic formation. Rainbow Falls Waterfall with faint rainbow Rainbow Falls Soda Springs Meadow and San Joaquin River Soda Springs Meadow and San Joaquin River Soda Springs Meadow and San Joaquin River River Hydrology Monitoring The Sierra Nevada national parks contain the headwaters of seven major watersheds, and the gradual spring melt of the winter snowpack provides water to park ecosystems as well as rural and urban areas throughout California. Learn more about the Sierra Nevada Network river hydrology project, monitoring the quantity and timing of streamflow in a subset of major rivers. Two women wearing raincoats and waders in the middle of a river taking measurements of flow levels. Monitoring Wetlands Ecological Integrity Wetlands occupy less than 10 percent of the Sierra Nevada, but they are habitat for a large diversity of plants and animals. They provide nesting and foraging habitat for birds, play an important role in the life cycle of many invertebrate and amphibian species, and are a rich source of food for small mammals and bears. They store nutrients and sediment and control flooding. Learn more about monitoring of plant communities, groundwater dynamics, and macroinvertebrates. Biologists examine a soil profile in a meadow to evaluate the type of wetland. Monitoring Birds in Sierra Nevada Network Parks More than 60 percent of the vertebrate species in Sierra Nevada Network parks are birds. These parks provide critical breeding, stopover, and wintering habitats for birds, but there are numerous stressors such as climate change and habitat loss that cause declines in some bird populations. Learn more about why birds are good indicators of ecosystem change and how they are being monitored. Western Tanager perched on a tree branch What’s Blooming in the Cold Air Pool? Climate scientists are investigating the potential of cold air pools—temperature inversions where cold, dense air concentrates in areas of high topographic variation—to maintain refugia that are buffered from climate change and enable the persistence of valued resources. Learn about 2017 FPL intern Sophia Chau's experience at Devils Postpile National Monument. Researcher beside a mountain stream NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Devils Postpile National Monument, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. devils postpile Sam Zuckerman Sam Zuckerman worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2017, and while he enjoyed the field work, this experience helped him decide he wanted to get involved with all the steps of carrying out a research project. He is pursuing a PhD in Natural Resources at the University of New Hampshire, where his research focuses on tree responses to drought in northeastern forests. Click on the article title to learn more. Field biologist uses meter tape to set up a forest monitoring plot in foxtail pine stand. Vladimir Kovalenko Vladimir (Vlad) Kovalenko worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2015 and 2016, and this work inspired him to go on to graduate school at the University of Montana in 2020. He is pursuing a Master's Degree in Systems Ecology, and his research will focus on Clark's Nutcracker ecology in the whitebark pine ecosystem in Glacier National Park. Click on the title of this article to learn more. Four scientists wearing backpacks with a scenic view of Sierra Nevada mountains in background. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Geologic Type Section Inventory for Sierra Nevada Network Parks A recent NPS Geological Resources Division report for Sierra Nevada Network parks highlights geologic features (or “stratotypes”) of parks that serve as the standard for identifying geologic units. Stratotypes are important because they store knowledge, represent important comparative sites where past knowledge can be built up or re-examined, and can serve as teaching sites for students. Learn more about Sierra Nevada geology and the stratotypes that help characterize it. View of sheer cliffs on northeast side of Mount Whitney, Sequoia National Park.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Visitor Guide to Devils Postpile and the Reds Meadow Valley National Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture The Post Photo: NPS Living with Wildland Fire Fire is a way of life in California and throughout the west. Its effects can be seen from the sagebrush to the red fir forests. With changing climate, California is experiencing warmer, drier winters and the possibility for large, damaging fires is increasing for a larger proportion of the year. History of Fire For thousands of years prior to the 20th century, fire shaped this landscape. Forests had fewer, yet larger, healthier trees, more widely spaced apart. In 1992, the Rainbow Fire burned hot and fast through the Reds Meadow Valley. The fire burned in areas where fire suppression had been in practice for years, leaving excessive fuel and dense stands of trees. The fire quickly threatened structures and human life and consumed all vegetation in its path. The Rainbow Fire provided a good example of what can happen when fire is removed from an ecosystem for years and fuels are allowed to build up. The fire also provided an opportunity for managers to look at how to live with wildland fire and how to include fire in the management of public lands. Are there Benefits of Wildland Fire? Yes, and changes created by fire are important. Fire, when managed properly, creates habitat diversity, valuable homes for wildlife, and improves the health of ecosystems while also protecting human life and property. Fire plays a natural role in clearing limbs, dead leaves, needles, small trees and shrubs from the forest floor. Fire also helps manage insect populations that prey on trees. But fire can also be catastrophic and in some cases, extremely damaging to ecosystems, life and property. Wildland Fire Management Today Today’s forests are thinned and cleared and low-lying vegetation is removed by prescribed fire, mechanical thinning, and pile burning. This management strategy helps to decrease the potential of catastrophic fires and promote healthier forests. When people live in or near the wildland, careful planning and work is required to manage forests and protect the community. Reducing fuel is a critical component in protecting life, property and the ecological health of the forest. Inside this guide, you will find valuable information on what you can do during your visit to help protect your public lands from human caused fire. Be a part of the solution this summer and help eliminate human-caused wildland fire. The monument is updating the existing Fire and Fuels Management Plan and Environmental Assessment. The purpose of the update is to expand fire and fuels management, respond to declining forest health, protect natural and cultural resources, and reduce the risk of catastrophic fire. The draft will be open for public comment in July. Check the website for updates. www.parkplanning.nps.gov/depo What’s Inside Trail to the Base of Rainbow Falls The trail to the base of Rainbow Falls is temporarily closed in order to complete needed trail work on the popular route to the base of the waterfall. The trail to the top of Rainbow Falls remains open, and visitors have access to the two viewpoints of the waterfall. The temporary closure of the trail is necessary for park crews to complete much needed trail maintenance and to mitigate rockfall hazards. The closure is expected to last throughout the season. Trail work is being completed by Devils Postpile National Monument staff with assistance from a local conservation trail crew. Shuttle Bus Information............ 2 Information and Services.......... 3 Area Map................................. 4-5 Hiking......................................... 6 Every Kid in a Park and Junior Rangers.................... 7 Citizen Science, Wildlife and Bookstores.......................... 8 Photo: NPS Devils Postpile and Reds Meadow Guide 1 Park the Car and Ride the Bus! Shuttle Bus and Fee Information The bus is mandatory for most visitors. See the chart below for prices. Tickets can be purchased at the Adventure Center, located at the main gondola building at Mammoth Mountain. National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Devils Postpile National Monument Mailing Address P.O. Box 3999 Mammoth Lakes, CA 93546 Phone: (760) 934-2289 Fax: (760) 934-4780 Web site: www.nps.gov/depo Parking for the shuttle bus is along the roadside near Mammoth Mountain Main Lodge. Leashed and muzzled dogs are welcome on buses. Please be careful walking along the roadside from the parking areas to the Adventure Center to purchase bus tickets. The trip into the valley takes about 30 minutes. Be prepared for a variety of conditions. Hiking shoes, sunscreen, water, and food are recommended. If you are one of the following, you qualify as an exception to the bus system and will be allowed to drive into the valley, and must pay a fee at the Minaret Vista Station. • Visitors displa
Visitor Guide to Devils Postpile and the Reds Meadow Valley 2016-2017 National Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The Post Devils Postpile Formation Photo: B. Blackburn The National Park Service Celebrates 100 Years! How will you celebrate the Centennial year of the National Park Service in 2016? Five years after celebrating the 100th anniversary of the designation of Devils Postpile National Monument, we celebrate another milestone: the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. As the National Park Service embarks on its second century, we are inviting the next generation to create new memories in special places that belong to all of us as Americans. On August 25th, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the National Park Service Organic Act, establishing a single agency to manage protection of 35 national parks and monuments. One hundred years later, Devils Postpile National Monument celebrates sharing America’s special places with over 400 national park units from across the country. These special places, according to the mission of the National Park Service, preserve our most outstanding scenery, wildlife, and habitat, and honor our most important historic events and people for enjoyment, education, and inspiration of visitors today and tomorrow. Over the last 100 years, the notion of a national park has transformed. The establishment of the National Park Service was intended to preserve the landscape of the American West. However, in 2016, national park units span across the United States, from the American Samoa to Puerto Rico, and encompass a wide variety of special places and stories. Visitors can engage with stories related to civil rights, such as desegregation at Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site in Arkansas. Women’s Rights National Historic Park in New York commemorates the first women’s rights convention. National Park Service sites across the nation honor important historic events and people, as well as protect and share the natural world. This idea of a national park continues to change. For some, a “park” is more than just a place; it may be a feeling of community, challenge, or inspiration. Perhaps it is a chance for reflection in a museum or beside a river. Perhaps it’s the opportunity to change the world for a better future—one step, or helping hand, at a time. The next 100 years of the National Park Service will come with its own set of challenges. One of the greatest challenges, climate change, will continue to affect national parks, the resources they protect, and impact the experiences of visitors. National parks help us gain a better understanding of how our planet is changing and help us find ways to mitigate our impacts and conserve parks for future generations. Across the parks, clear and concise reports on the “State of the Park” will communicate in-depth assessments, challenges, and opportunities of key resources and values. The report series is part of “Park Pulse,” an action goal in A Call to Action: Preparing for a Second Century of Stewardship and Engagement, the National Park Service priorities for its second century. The Devils Postpile National Monument State of the Park report is located at our website’s management section. In order to be relevant in the second century, the National Park Service will need to reach new audiences, tell stories that represent our nation’s diverse history, and cultivate a workforce that reflects the American population. With visitation increasing to record numbers, park managers face the challenge to protect these special places and stories and provide great experiences for all visitors to enjoy their national parks. The challenges facing parks across the nation, including Devils Postpile National Monument, reveal the importance of collaboration between the National Park Service, our partners, our supportive communities, and our visitors to help protect these special places. As we enter our second century, how will the National Park Service be inspired by the next generation of visitors? To usher in the next 100 years, we invite you to make meaningful connections and create memories in your parks and public lands, like Devils Postpile National Monument. Then share what speaks to you at FindYourPark.com. Deanna M. Dulen Superintendent, Devils Postpile National Monument Jon C. Regelbrugge District Ranger Mammoth Ranger District Inyo National Forest What’s Inside Shuttle Bus Information.................. 2 Information and Services................ 3 Area Map...................................... 4-5 Hiking............................................... 6 Every Kid in a Park and Junior Rangers......................... 7 Citizen Science, Wildlife and Bookstores and Partners................ 8 Park the Car and Ride the Bus! Shuttle Bus and Fee Information The bus is mandatory for most visitors. See the chart below for prices. Tickets can be purchase

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