"Devils Tower from the Joyner Ridge Trail" by S. Carter/NPS , public domain

Devils Tower

National Monument - Wyoming

Devils Tower (also Bear Lodge Butte) is a laccolithic butte composed of igneous rock in the Bear Lodge Mountains (part of the Black Hills) near Hulett and Sundance in Crook County, northeastern Wyoming, above the Belle Fourche River. It rises dramatically 1,267 feet (386 m) above the Belle Fourche River, standing 867 feet (265 m) from summit to base. The summit is 5,112 feet (1,559 m) above sea level. Devils Tower was the first declared United States National Monument, established on September 24, 1906, by President Theodore Roosevelt.

maps

Official visitor map of Devils Tower National Monument (NM) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Devils Tower - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Devils Tower National Monument (NM) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Bearlodge and Northern Hills Ranger Districts in the Black Hills National Forest (NF) in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Black Hills MVUM - Bearlodge 2020

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Bearlodge and Northern Hills Ranger Districts in the Black Hills National Forest (NF) in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motorized and Non-Motorized Recreation Trail Map of Bearlodge in Black Hills National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Black Hills - Bearlodge Trails

Motorized and Non-Motorized Recreation Trail Map of Bearlodge in Black Hills National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Newcastle Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Wyoming Public Land - Newcastle

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Newcastle Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/deto/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devils_Tower Devils Tower (also Bear Lodge Butte) is a laccolithic butte composed of igneous rock in the Bear Lodge Mountains (part of the Black Hills) near Hulett and Sundance in Crook County, northeastern Wyoming, above the Belle Fourche River. It rises dramatically 1,267 feet (386 m) above the Belle Fourche River, standing 867 feet (265 m) from summit to base. The summit is 5,112 feet (1,559 m) above sea level. Devils Tower was the first declared United States National Monument, established on September 24, 1906, by President Theodore Roosevelt. The Tower is an astounding geologic feature that protrudes out of the prairie surrounding the Black Hills. It is considered sacred by Northern Plains Indians and indigenous people. Hundreds of parallel cracks make it one of the finest crack climbing areas in North America. Devils Tower entices us to learn more, explore more and define our place in the natural and cultural world. The park entrance is located 33 miles northeast of Moorcroft, 27 miles northwest of Sundance, and 52 miles southwest of Belle Fourche, SD. If approaching from the east or west, take US Hwy 14 to WY 24 (follow the signs from I-90). If approaching from the north, take WY 112 to WY 24 (from Montana) or SD 34 / WY 24 (from South Dakota). Devils Tower National Monument Visitor Center The Devils Tower National Monument Visitor Center currently contains the Devils Tower Natural History Association Bookstore. New interpretive exhibits will be installed during the summer of 2021. The visitor center was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Devils Tower National Monument is accessed via Wyoming Hwy 24. From the east, take Interstate 90 exit 185; from the west, take Interstate 90 exit 153 (both exits are for US Hwy 14). Follow the signage from major highways to be directed toward the park. The visitor center is at the end of the park road, 3 miles from the entrance station. Belle Fourche River Campground The Belle Fourche River Campground is a 2-loop, 46-site campground with 4 accessible sites and 3 tent-only group sites. Drinking water is available at water spigots and in the restrooms. Large cottonwood trees provide shade. A picnic shelter and tables are available north of the campground. This is a first come, first served campground, no reservations. There is a 14-day limit on occupancy. There are 43 pull-through sites with room for RVs up to 35'. No hookups are available. Individual Sites 20.00 Individual sites can accommodate up to 8 people. A maximum of two vehicles (or 4 motorcycles) are permitted at each site. The nearby picnic area may be used for overflow parking. Group Sites 30.00 Group sites can accommodate up to 20 people per site. A maximum of 4 autos is permitted at each site. The nearby picnic area may be used for overflow parking if necessary. Accessible Sites 20.00 Accessible sites are: A2, A4, B11 and B25. Individual sites can accommodate up to 8 people. A maximum of two vehicles (or 4 motorcycles) are permitted at each site. The nearby picnic area may be used for overflow parking. The Belle Fourche Campground A peaceful, quiet campground with tents, fire grates and picnic benches. The Belle Fourche Campground Campground in Fall Campground with Devils Tower in the background September is a beautiful time to camp at Devils Tower National Monument! Group Site Several tents set up in a group site The three group sites are great for large gatherings Campground Map A map of the campground area The campground is separated into two loops, with basic services available throughout. Devils Tower looming above the trees Devils Tower looming above the trees Devils Tower looming above the trees Devils Tower from the Joyner Ridge Trail Devils Tower from the Joyner Ridge Trail Devils Tower from the Joyner Ridge Trail Fall at Devils Tower Fall at Devils Tower Fall at Devils Tower Prairie dogs at Devils Tower Prairie dogs at Devils Tower Prairie dogs at Devils Tower Devils Tower overlooking the Circle of Sacred Smoke Sculpture Devils Tower overlooking the Circle of Sacred Smoke Sculpture Devils Tower overlooking the Circle of Sacred Smoke Sculpture First All Female Ascent of Devils Tower In 1952, Jan Conn and Jane Showacre became the first all female team to complete a technical rock climb of Devils Tower. Read about the account as written by Jan Conn and published in Applachia Magazine later that same year. Two women standing with rock climbing equipment. Explorers for Bats Most scientists are not rock climbers, and vice-versa, but the two groups work together to study a unique type of animal: bats! As white-nose syndrome spreads across the United States and impacts bat populations, rock climbers who visit national parks are becoming key members of the research teams tasked with protecting threatened and endangered bat species. View a 13-minute video which highlights these efforts. person climbs sheer rock face The Genesis of a Name The name "Devils Tower" is one of controversy. Debates about the origins of the name and what it should be called today still occur. This article takes a broad look at the cultural changes of the United States during the time when the "Devils Tower" name was first used, and where the debate stands today. A rock monolith with vertical lines rises above frosted pine trees. Paleontology of Devils Tower National Monument Devils Tower National Monument is best known for its namesake feature, Devils Tower, but also includes paleontological resources. Fossils, primarily of bivalves and belemnite cephalopods, can be found in the Jurassic rocks that surround the Tower. Fossils have been occasionally reported from the monument by scientists in the past, but this is the first time that a thorough inventory has been made of the monument’s fossils a fossil with ruler for scale Partners for Bats Groups in Wyoming are preparing for the possibility of white-nose syndrome of bats coming into the area. Devils Tower and surrounding landscape Plant Community Monitoring at Devils Tower National Monument Devils Tower National Monument is on the edge of the Black Hills in northeastern Wyoming. The park contains ponderosa pine woodlands, mixed-grass prairie, and riparian plant communities. Monitoring plants in the park is important for tracking changes over time, and allows us to explore relationships between changes in community structure and climate change, grazing, fire, and other disturbances. closeup of a plant with silver green leavers and vivid purple flowers 2019 Connecting with our Homelands Awardees Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, is pleased to announce the 2019 awardees of the Connecting with our Homelands travel grants. Twenty-one Indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits have been awarded travel funds for trips to national park units across 12 states/territories within the United States. An elder and young student talk while sitting on a rock. National Park Getaway: Devils Tower National Monument In the Black Hills, a rocky sentinel bears witness to the changing seasons as it has for millions of years. Lengthening shadows of ponderosa pines reach like dark fingers towards Devils Tower National Monument. Devils Tower at Sunset Devils Tower or Bear Lodge? Devils Tower is a modern name for an ancient rock. Original names for the site, which come from various Northern Plains Indian tribes, evoke the site's traditional links to bear culture. Learn about the oral histories and traditional names for this iconic landmark in the Black Hills of Wyoming. A field of golden grasses, blue sky and white clouds, with a rock monolith in the background. Veteran Story - Randall Roseland Randall Roseland is the lead maintenance worker at Devils Tower National Monument. Before joining the park service, he served with the US Army and the South Dakota National Guard. Randall talks about how his military experience has helped with his transition to the NPS, and why this park is such a significant place for him. A man in military class A uniform posing in front of an American flag. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. devils tower Bat Projects in Parks: Devils Tower National Monument Citizen science is reaching new heights as bat biologists enlist the help of rock climbers at Devils Tower National Monument. Park staff and recreational climbers work together to learn how bats are using the Tower for roosting. These efforts are crucial as we continue to research white-nose syndrome and work to protect bats in the Black Hills and around the country. A person in a bat mascot costume Map Scavenger Hunt Activity 2 for Devils Tower National Monument's Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Explore the park map with a scavenger hunt. A hiking trail crossing through a prairie with Devils Tower, trees, and a rainbow in the background. Art in Nature Activity 1 for Devils Tower National Monument's Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Express your experiences in nature with art. A red, orange wood lily in a grassy area with a small bundle of white flowers in the background. Devils Tower Model Challenge Activity 3 for Devils Tower National Monument's Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Construct your own version of Devils Tower. Model of Devils Tower made out of acorn caps with black background One-Hour Photo (16 Exposures) A 2010 residency at Devils Tower allowed Chavawn Kelley to experiment with photography, and later inspired her written works here. long exposure photo of a night sky and steep rocky outcropping on a plain Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Nature Poetry Activity 5 for Devils Tower National Monument's Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Show off your creative writing skills inspired by nature. River meandering through grassy field with red cliffs and trees in the background. Backyard Geology Activity 6 for Devils Tower National Monument's Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Explore the geology of your own backyard. Devils Tower against a blue sky background with the boulder field and pine trees in the foreground. Northern Great Plains Annual Brome Adaptive Management Project Management and restoration of high quality, mixed-grass prairie to the NPS units has proved difficult and complex. The Annual Brome Adaptive Management project (ABAM) is attacking this problem through a cooperative effort. A firefighter uses a driptorch to ignite dried grasses while dark smoke billows behind. Devils Tower Virtual Junior Ranger Badge and Certificate Become official! Join us by swearing-in as a Devils Tower National Monument Virtual Junior Ranger. Draw a Bat Activity 4 for Devils Tower National Monument's Virtual Junior Ranger Program. Create your own bat! A brown and black bat on the side of a red wooden building with a blue pen for scale. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Prairie Ecology of the Badlands Badlands National Park is home to the nation's largest expanse of mixed-grass prairie. Here, plant species from both short-grass and tall-grass prairies mingle to create a unique home, well suited to many animals which call the park home. roots of tall yellow grasses penetrate into light brown soil beneath a cloudy blue sky. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Devils Tower National Monument Virtual Junior Ranger Activities Become a Devils Tower Junior Ranger from the comfort of your home! Complete at least four (4) of the six (6) activities listed below. Then, visit our Certificate page to be sworn in as an official Devils Tower Virtual Junior Ranger and get your virtual badge and certificate! close up of three prairie dog pups sitting on the edge of a borrow with grass in the background Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 11, No. 2, Fall 2019 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> devils tower Series: Plant Community Monitoring in Northern Great Plains Network Parks Plant communities are essential components of all major ecosystems. Plants are the ultimate source of food for other organisms and the main source of organic material in soil and water. They also influence climate and provide the scenery that park visitors enjoy. The NPS Northern Great Plains Network monitors the number, identity, and relative abundance of plant species, as well as their horizontal cover and vertical structure, to determine the health of park ecosystems. Two people sitting on the ground looking at plants Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center
Devils Tower National Monument National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Offcial Newspaper 2018 Edition Welcome to Devils Tower National Monument! Welcome to America’s first national monument! Devils Tower is an iconic formation, a monolith rising above the surrounding countryside. As you explore the monument today, the Tower you see will be remarkable, everlasting in its powerful appearance. Yet depending on the time of day and the weather, the formation can look dramatically di°erent. Often, it is yellow-green against a clear blue sky, but in shadow the Tower is black and seems to stand a little taller. When fog rolls in, it is shrouded in mist, only peeking out occasionally to say hello. If you visit in the winter, the Tower will be covered in a dusting of snow. And if you stay for the sunset, the sun’s rays will turn its face orange, refecting the colors of the sky. In this way, the formation is remarkably dynamic, appearing different as the day progresses and the seasons change – if you come back, you may see a di°erent Tower than the one you see today. But Devils Tower is also timeless, changing only on a scale imperceptible to human eyes. Things To Do • Explore the visitor center • Watch the prairie dogs (p. 4) • Attend a ranger program (p. 5) • Become a Junior Ranger (p. 5) • Take a hike (p. 8) • Look for wildlife (p. 4) • Climb the Tower (p. 6) • Camp in the Belle Fourche River Campground (p. 5) • Visit the Sacred Circle of Smoke Sculpture • See the stars (p. 5) • Take beautiful photographs • Listen to nature Since people frst arrived at Devils Tower more than 10,000 years ago, the monolith has remained essentially unchanged. The Tower you are seeing today is the same formation that Theodore Roosevelt protected as the nation’s first national monument in 1906, the same landmark that explorers and settlers used as they moved west across the country, and the same stone monolith where Native Americans have gathered and prayed for thousands of years. The sense of awe that the Tower gives us is truly timeless. As you explore the monument today, we invite you to refect on this timelessness. What does Devils Tower mean to you? We hope that you will carry this meaning with you as you continue to explore America’s public lands – so get out there and Find Your Park! Parking at Devils Tower During the summer, parking around the visitor center between 10 am and 3 pm is often limited. Consider parking in other designated areas during these peak visitation hours. For vehicles with trailers, long-vehicle parking spaces are available to unhook your rig before heading up to the visitor center - fnd them on the way to the picnic area. The picnic area provides access to the Circle of Sacred Smoke sculpture and the prairie dog town. You can also fnd parking at Joyner Ridge trailhead (inaccessible to most RVs and other large vehicles). From these areas, you can choose to hike to the visitor center. 2 Geology l 3 Stories l 4 Flora & Fauna l 5 Programs 6 Rock Climbing l 7 Park Supporters and Neighbors l 8 Park Map Devils Tower National Monument l WY-110, P.O. Box 10, Devils Tower, WY 82714 l (307)-467-5283 www.nps.gov/deto Stories of the Tower The Geologic Story of Devils Tower Devils Tower is a unique geologic formation that defes expectations and explanations. The formation of the Tower has fascinated and inspired geologists and other casual passersby for hundreds of years. Kiowa Oral History of the Tower’s Creation Geologists agree on a couple of main points on the origin of the Tower. They agree that the Tower is composed of an igneous rock called phonolite porphyry. The Little Missouri Buttes, a formation to the northwest of the Tower and made of the same rock, were probably formed from the same body of magma as the Tower only a few thousand years earlier. Phonolite porphyry is relatively rare on the surface of the Earth and is only found in a few other places worldwide. The Tower formed about 1.5 miles below the surface when magma pushed up through sedimentary layers around 50 million years ago. What geologists still debate is how that process took place and whether or not the magma ever reached the land surface. Numerous ideas have evolved since the frst geologic studies of the Tower in the late 1800s. Today, there are four primary theories, but geologists continue to search for more detailed explanations. The following is a translation of a Kiowa story told in 1987. Included in the novella First Encounters (available in the bookstore), it is one of the stories compiled by historian Dick Stone. Before the Kiowa came south they were camped on a stream in the far north where there were a great many bears, many of them. One day, seven little girls were playing at a distance from the village and were chased by some bears. The girls ran toward the village and the bears were just about to catch them when the girls jumped on a low rock, about three feet high. One of the girls prayed to the rock, “

also available

National Parks
USFS NW