by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Death Valley

National Park - CA,NV

Death Valley National Park straddles eastern California and Nevada. It’s known for Titus Canyon, with a ghost town and colorful rocks, and Badwater Basin’s salt flats, North America's lowest point. Above, Telescope Peak Trail weaves past pine trees. North of the spiky salt mounds known as the Devil’s Golf Course, rattlesnakes live in Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes.

maps

Official visitor map of Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).Nevada State - Nevada State Highway Map

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).

brochures

Summer edition of the Visitor Guide for Death Valley National Park (NP) in Nevada and California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Guide Summer 2021

Summer edition of the Visitor Guide for Death Valley National Park (NP) in Nevada and California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Winter edition of the Visitor Guide for Death Valley National Park (NP) in Nevada and California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Guide Winter 2020/2021

Winter edition of the Visitor Guide for Death Valley National Park (NP) in Nevada and California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/deva https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_Valley_National_Park Death Valley National Park straddles eastern California and Nevada. It’s known for Titus Canyon, with a ghost town and colorful rocks, and Badwater Basin’s salt flats, North America's lowest point. Above, Telescope Peak Trail weaves past pine trees. North of the spiky salt mounds known as the Devil’s Golf Course, rattlesnakes live in Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes. In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes. Yet, each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley. The main road transecting Death Valley National Park from east to west is California Highway 190. On the east in Nevada, U.S. Route 95 parallels the park from north to south with connecting highways at Scotty's Junction (State Route 267), Beatty (State Route 374), and Lathrop Wells (State Route 373). Furnace Creek Visitor Center Furnace Creek Visitor Center is the central hub for all things Death Valley. Here you can pay the park entrance fee, speak with a ranger about trip plans or questions, participate in the Junior Ranger program watch the 20 minute park film, explore museum displays, and browse the park bookstore. Las Vegas, NV - Blue Diamond NV160 west to Pahrump, NV. Left on Bell Vista/State Line Road to Death Valley Junction and then left on CA190 (west) into the park. Lone Pine, CA - Take CA 190 east into the park. Ridgecrest, CA - Head north toward Trona, CA on CA178 to CA190. Baker, CA - Take 127 North to CA178 or CA190 west (left). Beatty, NV - Take NV374 south/west into the park. Emigrant Campground First come / first served tent only campground with no additional fee. Located next to CA 190 at 2100' feet in elevation. Emigrant campground overlooks the Cottonwood Mountains which is a part of the Panamint Range. This is a small campground with 10 sites southwest of Stovepipe Wells Ranger Station. A building with flush toilets is 270 feet down a dirt trail just outside of the campground. Emigrant Campground Camping Fee 0.00 Free. There is no cost to camp here. Please pay your park entry fee. Emigrant Campground Sample Site #1 Row of loose 12 inch rocks separate a flat, gravel area. Metal picnic bench on far side. Open views at the Emigrant tenting sites. Emigrant Campground Entrance Symbol for tent on a small brown sign on a post stands left of a dirt road. White clouds dot sky. Emigrant is a tent-only campground with 10 sites. Emigrant Campground Nearby Restroom Stone building next to 4 ft wide rock path then asphalt. Space in front wall is entrance.. Flush toilets are located just outside Emigrant Campground. Eureka Dunes Dry Camp Remote campground at the base of Eureka Dunes, the tallest sand dunes in California and home to several endemic plant species. This campground is located at 2,880ft and is accessible to high-clearance vehicles. Please drive only on existing roads and tread lightly on the dunes to protect this fragile and unique environment. Backcountry Campground 0.00 Park entry fee/pass required. No additional camping fee. Eureka Dunes Campground Desert campsite with picnic table, metal fire ring, view of tall sand dunes in the background Primitive campsite with view of sand dunes Furnace Creek Campground Furnace Creek Campground is the only campground operated by NPS within the park that accepts reservations. This is by far the most popular campground in the park and offers 18 sites with full hookup as well as many shady tent sites. Reservations are strongly recommended. Be aware that there are 4 other campgrounds in Furnace Creek. Both Texas Springs and Sunset Campgrounds operated by NPS are directly across the highway. Additional private campgrounds are within one mile at Furnace Creek Ranch. RV/Tent Sites 22.00 Standard campsite. No more than eight people and two vehicles or one recreational vehicle per site. Larger groups wishing to camp together can reserve group sites at the Furnace Creek Campground. Full Hook-up Sites 36.00 RV/Tent site fee (half-price with Lifetime Pass) plus $12 Utility Fee (not discounted) Group Sites #3, 4, 5 35.00 9-15 people, up to 4 vehicles. No discount for Lifetime Pass. Group Sites #1 and #2 60.00 9-40 people, up to 10 vehicles. No discount for Lifetime Pass. Furnace Creek Campground kiosk a small building with a flagpole Rangers are available to take campground fees. Furnace Creek Campground a truck and camper on a paved site with sparse vegetation Sites are paved to accommodate level trailer parking. Furnace Creek Campground tents set up on gravel Tenting is permitted, and picnic tables and fire rings are provided. Furnace Creek Campground a campground with trailers and tents This campground offers moderate space between sites and occasional trees. Homestake Dry Camp Extremely remote campsite at 3,785ft of elevation, accessible only by high-clearance vehicles with all-terrain tires. Access from Saline Valley Road requires navigating Lippincott Pass and should only be attempted by experienced 4-wheel drivers. There are no approved toilet facilities at this location and no water available. Pack in all that you need, pack out all that you bring. Camping Fee 0.00 Free (Death Valley entrance fee or Annual/Lifetime Pass required) Homestake Campground Primitive camping, desert view of mountains from campsite, rock fire ring Homestake Dry Camp is primitive camping and offers no amenities Mahogany Flat Campground First come / first served primitive campground with no additional fee located in a Pinyon Pine and Juniper forest at 8,200' elevation. Great views down into Death Valley. Located near the Telescope Peak trailhead. Dirt road access requires high-clearance vehicles, often 4x4 required. Mahogany Flat Campground Fee 0.00 This primitive campground does not have a nightly fee. Mahogany Flat Campground Sign Pine trees surround wooden sign on wood posts reads Mahogany Flat Campground Elevation 8133 Feet. This higher elevation campsite is closed in the winter. Mahogany Flat Campground Sample Site #1 A flat dirt circular area about 25 ft across surrounded on 3 sides by tall evergreen trees. Sites are in a pinyon/juniper forest, with picnic tables and fire rings provided. Mahogany Flat Campground Sample Site #2 Dirt open area with scattered 1 ft boulders, metal picnic table, metal fire ring, & Evergreen trees. One of a handful of tent sites from which to choose. Views from Mahogany Flat To men stand on flat ground & point outward through pine trees to a valley below. Breaks in the trees provide views into the valley. More Views from the Campground Flat clear area slopes down to dense trees then white-floored desert valley & blue-tinged mountains. Sites on the east part of the camp have an amazing view of the valley floor. Mesquite Spring Campground First come / first served campground at an elevation of 1,800 feet, located 2 miles off of the Scotty’s Castle Road below Grapevine Canyon. It is a great base camp for your adventures in the northern parts of Death ValIey National Park. It is surrounded by desert mountains and geological features. Each site has a fire grate and picnic table. There are no hook-ups available. Fee is paid at the automatic pay station at the front of the campground. Mesquite Campground Fee - Standard Rate 14.00 Standard nightly rate for a camp site. Mesquite Campground Fee - Lifetime Pass Rate 7.00 Reduced rate for Senior and Access pass holders. Per night. Per site. Mesquite Springs Sample Camp Site #1 Camper sits on dirt ground outside tent with bicycles nearby. A camper enjoys their time at Mesquite campground. Mesquite Springs Restrooms 2 doors with square concrete ground pads on red brick building. 1 reads Men, other is open. Two restroom buildings with flush toilets are available. Mesquite Springs Sample Site #2 Flat dirt & gravel clearing surrounded by small brown bushes has metal picnic table & fire ring. All sites have a picnic table and fire ring. Mesquite Springs Campground Sample Site #3 Row of small bushes separate road from site. BBQ, fire pit & table close together on dirt ground. A few sites have pole-mounted barbeques. Stovepipe Wells Campground First come, first served campground located at sea level. The Stovepipe Wells campground has views of Death Valley proper and of the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes. It is adjacent to the Stovepipe Wells general store, ranger station, and a privately operated RV park. Fee is paid at the pay station at the front of the campground. Stovepipe Wells Camping - Standard Rate 14.00 Fee per campsite per night. Stovepipe Wells Camping - Senior & Access Rate 7.00 Fee is per campsite per night, for Senior and Access Pass holders. Stovepipe Wells Campground Restroom A rectangular building with mens and womens doors on opposite ends & a third door in center. Bathroom facilities at Stovepipe Wells Campground. Stovepipe Tent Area Wooden sign on post reads Tent Area Parking Only. Wood Gathering Prohibited. There is a tent only area in the northside of the campground. Stovepipe Wells Campground 4 metal picnic tables surround a metal fire ring on an open, gravel area. The group fire ring is only place wood fires are permitted in Stovepipe Wells Campground. Stovepipe Wells Campground At least 8 tents line up on a gravel surface surrounded by cars. Winter and Spring can lead to busy campgrounds. Views from Stovepipe Wells Campground Large mountains in the distance fill the background of an open, gravel lot with 2 RVs. The Stovepipe Wells Campground is in an open area with views of the surrounding mountains. Sunset Campground First come, first served, large campground that rarely fills. This location has little to no vegetation and is comprised of desert gravels. Car and tent camping is permitted however each site DOES NOT offer a firegrate or picnic table. Campfires are not allowed in Sunset except at a few designated public areas within the campground. Fee is paid at the pay station in the campground. Sunset Campground Camping - Senior/Access Rate 7.00 Reduced rate of $7 for valid Senior & Access pass holders. Pay fee using card at automated fee machine in the campground. You may also head across the highway to the park visitor center to pay by card, cash, or check. Sunset Campground Overview a long distance view of RVs and trailers in a gravel area with distant mountains Sunset Campground is in a flat alluvial area with distant views of mountains. Sunset Campground Street View a roadway through gravel with RVs parked at spots marked by cement curbs Sunset Campground is in a flat alluvial area with distant views of mountains. Texas Springs Campground First come, first served campground located in the hills above Furnace Creek. Great views and some trees. No generators allowed. Each site has a firegrate and picnic table. Fee is paid at pay station at the front of the campground. Texas Spring Camping 16.00 Camping fee per night at Texas Spring Campground Texas Spring overlooking a valley with a few green trees surrounded by mountains The spring which gives the campground its name is a short walk away. Texas Spring restrooms a stone building with red roof tiles Historic restrooms at the Texas Spring campground. Thorndike Campground First come / first served primitive, forested campground with no additional fee located at 7,400' elevation. Accessible to high clearance vehicles (no longer than 25'), and 4x4 may be necessary. Thorndike Campground 0.00 This primitive campground does not have a nightly fee. Thorndike CG Entrance Sign 2' metal tent sign on top of small wood horizontal sign on a post reads, Thorndike Campground. Entrance Sign for Thorndike Campground Thorndike CG Sample Site 30' diameter flat space with a metal picnic table surrounded by tall trees.. Most sites include space for tent, fire ring, and metal picnic table. Thorndike CP Sample Site with Tent Orange 2-person tent set-up on flat dirt space set back between 2 tall trees. All sites are spacious and surrounded by tall trees. Thorndike Campground 4 stone steps lead from road to flat dirt area surrounded by small shrubs & trees. This primitive campground is within a pinyon pine and juniper forest. Thorndike Campground Large flat dirt area with a metal table in the center densely surrounded by tall trees. Most campsites offer a mixture of shade and sun. Warm Springs Campground This is a clothing-optional hot spring area approximately 35 miles from the nearest paved road. A high-clearance vehicle and all-terrain tires are necessary to access this campground, and road/weather conditions may necessitate 4-wheel drive. This campground is located at 1,375ft, but requires navigating either North Pass at 7,300ft or South Pass at 5,997ft and may be inaccessible due to winter conditions. Camping Fee 0.00 (Death Valley entrance fee or Annual/Lifetime Pass required) Wildrose Campground First come / first served campground with no additional fee high in the Panamint Mountains. Located at an elevation of 4100 ft / 1250 meters. No hook-ups available. Generators allowed 7am - 7pm. This area is prone to high winds. Sites are dirt and gravel surrounded by Mesquite bushes and rolling hills. Wildrose Camping Fee 0.00 Wildrose Campground is a free. Please pay your park entry fee to show your support of the park. Wildrose Information Board Eye level bulletin board stands on 2 wood posts. Wood box with hinged top opening attached to side. Check out the information board next to site #2 for updated campground information. Wildrose Campground Sample Site #1 Metal picnic table & metal fire ring on flat dirt clearing lined in the back by small dried bushes. A table and fire ring are included at each site at Wildrose. Wildrose Tents Only Loop A wooden sign on a wood post reads tents only. Dried bushes extend behind sign right of open area. Spaces 14 - 23 are for tents only. Wildrose Campground Sample Site #2 Dirt & gravel area is flat on the west with a gradual incline on the east side. Two tent sites rise above the rest of the campground on the hillside. View from Wildrose Campground Large flat, packed dirt & gravel area with dispersed small bushes. One hill covers background. All sites are on a plateau surrounded by rolling hills and Mesquite bushes. Sunset from Zabriskie Point badlands bathed in pale pink and orange light from the setting sun The warm light of sunset covers the badlands at Zabriskie Point. Zabriskie Point Morning light on the badlands below Zabriskie Point. Zabriskie Point is a popular place to view sunrise over the badlands. Storm over the Salt Flats white salt flats with dark gray clouds Badwater Basin is the lowest point in North America at -282 feet. Sunset at Dantes View a sunset overlooking a valley filled with white salt A mile above the salt flats in the valley below, Dantes View provides breathtaking vistas. Lupine and Tortoiseshell Butterfly pink lupine flowers with an orange and black butterfly Higher elevations provide a respite from the heat in this alpine ecosystem. Wildrose Charcoal Kilns nine 25 foot tall rock beehive structures Nearly a century and a half old, these are some of the best preserved kilns in the western U.S. A rare superbloom of Desert Gold. a field of yellow flowers with a mountain About once a decade, rains at the right times can lead to a rare superbloom! Hottest Place on Earth thermometer reading 130 f 54 c Summers are infamously hot, as for 6 months of the year temperatures above 120 degrees are regularly recorded. Winding canyons await polished walls of a narrow canyon There are numerous canyons to explore across this vast park. 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Partnerships add a Charge to your Travel Plans The National Park Service, the National Park Foundation, BMW of North America, the U.S. Department of Energy, concessioners, and gateway communities have collaborated to provide new technologies for travel options to and around national parks. As part of this public-private partnership, BMW of North America, working through the National Park Foundation, donated and arranged for the installation of 100 electric vehicle (EV) charging ports in and around national parks. Star Wars in Death Valley Star Wars in Death Valley? Learn about how you can visit Tatooine! A park ranger stands in the desert next to a gold robot. Desert Bighorn Sheep: Living Life on the Edge Desert bighorn sheep are true survivors who live on rugged land with few resources. Despite being well adapted to harsh desert terrain, bighorn sheep are vulnerable to climate change, habitat fragmentation, disease and other outside threats. Learn about these regal animals, and the role you can play in helping them survive. A desert bighorn sheep stands on the edge of a rock, looking down. Started from the Bottom: A Mission from Death Valley to Denali on Horseback In 1958, Stanley Upton of Riverside, California hatched an ambitious plan. He was determined to trek from the lowest point in North America, in Death Valley, to the highest point on Denali’s summit. On Location: An Introduction to Film in National Parks National parks have provided the backdrop for many iconic American films, including the original "Star Wars" trilogy at Death Valley National Park, "Thelma and Louise" at Canyonlands National Park, and many more. Filmmakers have been recording at National Park Service sites since the early years of motion picture history. While the location might not be the first thing in the credits, these films and television shows shine a spotlight on park landscapes. A uniformed ranger shakes hands with C3PO, a Star Wars character, in a bare and hilly landscape. PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Beyond the Surface: National Recognition of the California Desert This year marks the 25th anniversary of Death Valley National Park and the California Desert Protection Act, signed into law by Bill Clinton on October 31, 1994. The Act converted Death Valley and Joshua Tree National Monuments into National Parks, added more land to both sites, and established the 1.6 million-acre Mojave National Preserve. It was unprecedented, setting aside over nine million acres of Wilderness. Learn more about the CA deserts' history. A twisted, multi-branched tree, with tufts of vegetation, set against a setting sun. World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] desert landscape with flowers in bloom 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Death Valley's Moving Rocks Explore the mystery of the moving rocks of Death Valley's Racetrack. Boulders leave a mysterious trail in the surface of a dry lakebed How Lake Mead Stopped a Potent Invasive Plant Infestation Fountaingrass (Pennisetum setaceum) is an invasive ornamental species planted in several areas of the Southwest. When the staff at Lake Mead discovered the plant near remote mountain springs 12 miles upriver from the original plantings the Lake Mead Invasive Plant Management Team (LAKE IPMT) knew they had to hurry to prevent a dangerous fountaingrass infestation. Travis Fulton, LAKE IPMT, controlling fountain grass on a hillside at Joshua Tree National Park. Viva DEVA: A Valley of Death, Full of Life During 2017, paleontology intern Matthew Ferlicchi expanded our understanding of the expansive fossil record at Death Valley National Park. Matthew's backcountry hiking skills enabled him to venture to several remote fossil localities in the park which led to new discoveries. Two of the discoveries has generated interest by two teams of paleontologists to initiate paleontological research at Death Valley National Park. ammonite fossils The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Ancient Springs Reveal a Pleistocene Vertebrate Fauna and a 100,000 Year Record of Paleoclimate in Death Valley National Park Recent investigation of the Rogers beds of Death Valley National Park, California, have uncovered abundant bones of late Pleistocene animals. Study of the beds themselves show that they are ancient spring-fed wetlands deposits, like those seen elsewhere in the Southwest, and tie into the Mojave Desert record of regional climate cycles. fossils and rocks on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Desert Bighorn Sheep: Connecting a Desert Landscape Desert bighorn sheep live on islands of mountain habitat and use surrounding desert for travel and food. These same desert areas contain a variety of human-made barriers that threaten the area’s individual bighorn herds. Researchers are collecting data that will provide telling information about how we can help support and protect bighorn populations across the Mojave Desert into the future. Up close bighorn sheep standing on top of a large rock. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Lower Vine Ranch Cultural Landscape The Death Valley Scotty Historic District is an area of regional significance in the fields of 20th century architecture, folklore and social history, and of local significance in the fields of archeology, art and invention. Lower Vine Ranch served as the residence for Death Valley Scotty (Walter Scott), one of the best known and most colorful figures produced by the American mining frontier, between 1930 and 1952. Ranch house Thomason/Barker Ranch Cultural Landscape The Thomason/Barker Ranch cultural landscape, in Death Valley National Park, is located in the southern Panamint Range in the southwestern portion of the park. Although the property is historically and currently referred to as a “ranch,” it should more accurately be described as a single-family primitive retirement retreat, or "primitive recreational ranch." It embodies the pattern of settlement and activity identified with this region from the 1930s-1950s. A single-story dwelling of stone and wood construction in a dry landscape with low shrubs. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossils on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Denali History Nuggets Little-known episodes from Denali's history! a large dog pulling a woman on a sled Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 09, No. 2, Fall 2017 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> skull on the lawn at the national mall Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks Silurian Period—443.8 to 419.2 MYA Excellent exposures and well-preserved fossils in Silurian rocks of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve provide clues to the timing of the assembly of Alaska’s assembly from a variety of continental fragments. fossil corals in a rock matrix The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center
Summer Visitor Guide J. JURADO Death Valley National Park Wildrose Charcoal Kilns Welcome to Your Death Valley Adventure Visiting the Park During COVID-19 Death Valley takes the health of its visitors, staff, and partners seriously. We encourage you to follow CDC guidance to reduce the spread of COVID-19. You Should: Maintain a 6-foot distance from others who aren't in your group. Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze. Wash your hands frequently. Soap may not always be available; bring your own hand sanitizer. se 2019 (COVID-19) What to Expect During this pandemic, park managers will be continuously assessing conditions and guidance from local, state, and national health officials in order to respond to changing conditions. Facilities such as visitor centers, restaurants, campgrounds, and bathrooms will be open when possible, but may close or offer limited access due to health guidance or staffing. nts on Dialysis Safe Avoid touching your face, especially your eyes, nose, and mouth. We thank you for your patience and understanding as we work to navigate this pandemic in a safe and responsible manner. Hottest, Driest, Lowest Death Valley National Park is the hottest place on Earth, with a recorded temperature of 134°F (57°C) on July 10, 1913. It is also the driest U.S. national park, and Badwater Basin (-282 feet/-86m) features the lowest elevation in North America! These conditions come together to make Death Valley a land of extremes, where the powerful heat is a force of nature, and the air further dries everything it contacts. Exploring safely in the summer means being inside an air conditioned vehicle or going higher in elevation. Spending more than a few minutes in the extreme heat can quickly lead to dehydration and heat illness, as you lose more water by sweating than your body can absorb by drinking. The summer of 2020 set a number of heat records (more details on page 6). On Sunday, August 16, at 3:41 p.m., the Furnace Creek Thermometer recorded a high temperature of 130°F (54°C). Whether auto touring with the air conditioning on, or walking in the higher elevations of the park, visiting in the summer is all about staying cool and safe. More Inside... Entrance Fees and Passes ������������������2 Safety & Rules �����������������������������������3 Things to See ������������������������������������4 Park Map ������������������������������������������5 Wear a mask in all buildings and where a 6-foot distance cannot ss that can spread from person to person, be maintained, such as on a busy trail, parking lot, or view point. Partnerships ��������������������������������������6 s Camping�������������������������������������������8 h soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer Pending official verification, this would break the August monthly record of 127°F (53°C), and would tie for the fourth hottest temperature on Earth! Average Temperatures�����������������������6 Sunrise & Sunset Locations ����������������7 Experiencing Night Skies �������������������7 Visitor Services ���������������������������������8 Junior Ranger Program Free Junior Ranger books are available at the Furnace Creek Visitor Center or can be downloaded from our website. Learn about the park and complete activities to earn a badge! If you are unable to turn in your booklet in person, email pictures of your book to DEVA_information@ nps.gov and a ranger will check your work virtually and mail you a badge! Death Valley National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Parks are Living Museums Quick Facts • Size: 3,422,024 acres� • Establishment: February 11, 1933� Death Valley National Monument was established, protecting nearly 2 million acres� • Redesignation: October 31, 1994� Another 1�3 million acres were added and the area redesignated as Death Valley National Park� Park Mailing Address Death Valley National Park PO Box 579 Death Valley, CA 92328 Email DEVA_information@nps�gov Phone 760-786-3200 Park Website www�nps�gov/deva Park Social Media Facebook�com/DeathValleyNPS Instagram�com/DeathValleyNPS EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ Entrance Fee Required Pay your entrance fee at a visitor center or one of the automated fee machines across the park. Annual and lifetime passes cover this fee. U.S. Veterans and Gold Star families are eligible for free entry. Show your pass or qualifying identification at a visitor center to receive a park map and trip planning information. Display passes on your vehicle dash while visiting. 7-day Passes Private Vehicle�������������������������������������$30 Motorcycle������������������������������������������$25 Individual entering on bicycle or foot���$15 Annual and Lifetime Passes Interagency Annual Pass���������������������$80 Death Valley Annual Pass��������������������$55 Interagency Lifetime Senior Pass����������$80 (for U.S. citizens aged 62+) Interagency Annual Senior Pass�����������$20 (for U.S. citizens aged 62+) Interagency
Winter Visitor Guide T.VANDERLAY Death Valley National Park Sunset from Dantes View Welcome to Your Death Valley Adventure Visiting the Park During COVID-19 Death Valley takes the health of its visitors, staff, and partners seriously. We encourage you to follow CDC guidance to reduce the spread of COVID-19. You Should: Maintain a 6-foot distance from others who aren't in your group. Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze. Wash your hands frequently. Soap may not always be available; bring your own. se 2019 (COVID-19) What to Expect During this pandemic, park managers will be assessing local conditions & guidance from local, state, and national health officials, and will respond to changing conditions. Facilities such as visitor centers, restaurants, campgrounds, and bathrooms will be open when possible, but may close due to health guidance or staffing. We thank you for your patience and understanding as we work to navigate this pandemic in a safe and responsible manner. nts on Dialysis Safe Avoid touching your face, especially your eyes, nose, and mouth. Wear a mask in all buildings (Inyo county ss that can spread from personorto person, where requirement) a 6-foot distance cannot be maintained, such as on a busy trail. s h soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer Hottest, Driest, Lowest Death Valley National Park is the hottest place on Earth, with a recorded temperature of 134 °F (57°C) on July 10, 1913. It is also the driest U.S. national park, and Badwater Basin (-282 feet) features the lowest elevation in North America! In the cooler winter months, endless exploration and a diversity of experiences await you. Hiking, visiting historic sites, traveling backcountry roads, and seeing the night skies are only a few of the opportunities available! These conditions come together to make Death Valley a land of extremes, where the powerful heat is a force of nature, and the air further dries everything it contacts. With over 3 million acres of federally designated Wilderness, so many adventures await! Walk among majestic sand dunes, navigate twisted slot canyons, climb rocky peaks, or stroll along salt flats during your Death Valley adventure. This summer, Death Valley reached 128°F, which was the hottest recorded temperature anywhere on Earth since 2017—again making history with our heat! More Inside... Safety & Rules �������������������������������������� 2 Entrance Fees and Passes ��������������������� 2 Protect Yourself & Your Pets ����������������� 3 Things to See ��������������������������������������� 4 Hiking Trails ����������������������������������������� 5 Park Map ������������������������������������������ 6-7 For Kids! ���������������������������������������������� 8 Wilderness ������������������������������������������� 8 Bicycles ������������������������������������������������ 8 Sunrise, Sunset & Night Skies ��������������� 9 Nature & Culture�������������������������������� 10 Wildlife ���������������������������������������������� 11 Visitor Services ���������������������������������� 12 Camping�������������������������������������������� 12 Inside this trip-planning guide learn how to safely explore and enjoy this amazing national park. Junior Ranger Program Free Junior Ranger books are available at the visitor center or can be downloaded from our website. Learn about the park and complete activities to earn a badge! If you are unable to turn in your booklet in person, email pictures of your book to DEVA_information@ nps.gov and a ranger will check your work virtually! Death Valley National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Parks are Living Museums Set aside as a National Monument in 1933, becoming a National Park in 1994, and expanded again in 2019, Death Valley National Park conserves remarkable biodiversity over incredible elevation changes all within the impressive vistas in this Wilderness setting� Park Mailing Address Death Valley National Park PO Box 579 Death Valley, CA 92328 Email DEVA_information@nps�gov Phone 760-786-3200 Park Website www�nps�gov/deva Park Social Media Facebook�com/DeathValleyNPS Instagram�com/DeathValleyNPS The National Park Service cares for the special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage� EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ Entrance Fee Required Support your park by paying the required entrance fee at a visitor center or at one of the automated fee machines placed throughout the park� Already have one of the passes listed below? Enjoy the park! 7-day Passes Vehicle and Passenger ������������������������ $30 Motorcycle����������������������������������������� $25 Individual entering on bicycle or foot�� $15 Annual Passes Death Valley Annual Pass ������������������� $55 Interagency Annual Pass �������������������� $80 Interagency Annual Senior Pass ���������� $20 (for U�S� citizens aged 62+) Interagency Annual Military Pass ������� Free (for active duty military

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