"Mirrored surface of Delaware River at Bushkill, Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Delaware Water Gap

National Recreation Area - NJ,PA

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area is located along the middle section of the Delaware River in New Jersey and Pennsylvania stretching from the Delaware Water Gap northward in New Jersey to the state line near Port Jervis, New York, and in Pennsylvania to the outskirts of Milford. A 40-mile (64 km) section of the Delaware River, entirely within the National Recreation Area, has been granted protected status as the Middle Delaware National Scenic River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System and is also administered by the National Park Service. This section of the river is the core of the historical Minisink region.

maps

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (NRA) in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Delaware Water Gap - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (NRA) in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River (SRR) in New York and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Upper Delaware - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River (SRR) in New York and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/dewa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware_Water_Gap_National_Recreation_Area The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area is located along the middle section of the Delaware River in New Jersey and Pennsylvania stretching from the Delaware Water Gap northward in New Jersey to the state line near Port Jervis, New York, and in Pennsylvania to the outskirts of Milford. A 40-mile (64 km) section of the Delaware River, entirely within the National Recreation Area, has been granted protected status as the Middle Delaware National Scenic River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System and is also administered by the National Park Service. This section of the river is the core of the historical Minisink region. Need to get away from everything for a while? We know the place. This sacred land has been cherished by people for over 10,000 years. Its fields and forests a bounty for those that have come before us, and a national treasure for us to enjoy today. With waterfalls, over 100 miles of hiking trails and three swim beaches that allow grilling, there's lots of ways to #FindYourPark #EcuentraTuParque Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area is a long, narrow park that sits between two major interstates, I-80 at the south and I-84 at the north. US 209 is the main north/south road through the park on the Pennsylvania side and Old Mine Road is the main north/south road though the park on the New Jersey side. Bushkill Meeting Center Temporary visitor center while park headquarters is closed due to construction. Park information, NPS passport cancellation, America the Beautiful and park passes, restrooms, McDade Recreational Trail access. ** As a public health precaution, Bushkill Meeting Center is temporarily closed for the safety of staff and visitors. Updates will be posted to the park website, www.nps.gov/dewa, and on Twitter and Facebook: @DelWaterGapNPS ** Bushkill Meeting Center is located approximately 9 miles north of I-80 and approximately 20 miles south of I-84 on Milford Road (US-209) in Pennsylvania. US-209 intersects can be easily accessed from both I-80 and I-84. Located in Bushkill, PA (address comes up at East Stroudsburg, PA) Dingmans Falls Visitor Center Closed for the season. Park information, exhibits, souvenir and bookstore, NPS passport cancellation, restrooms, drinking water, wheel chair and stroller accessible Dingmans Creek Trail to Silverthread and Dingmans Falls, guided waterfall walks. During the summer, parking can fill by 11:00 am, most weekends. Please plan your visit accordingly. There is no RV parking at this location. Some RV parking is available one mile from the visitor center, at the corner of PA Route 209, and Johnny Bee Road. The Dingmans Falls Visitor Center is approximately 8 miles south of I-84 and approximately 21 miles north of I-80, and can be accessed via US-209. The visitor center is on Dingmans Falls Road, about 1 mile from the turn from US-209 onto Dingmans Falls Road. Located in Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania; GPS: 41.229477, -74.887899 Kittatinny Point Visitor Center Closed for the season. Visitor Services and information available at Bushkill Meeting Center. The Kittatinny Point Visitor Center is located in New Jersey, off of I-80, and is approximately 35 miles south of I-84. To get to the Kittatinny Point Visitor Center from I-80, take exit 1 in New Jersey and follow the signs to the visitor center, which is within a half mile from the exit. From I-84, it is possible to get to the visitor center via River Road and Old Mine Road. Located in Columbia, New Jersey; GPS: 40.970202, -75.128278 Millbrook Village Closed for the Season. See calendar for information about special events offered late fall through early spring. Park information, exhibits, museum shop, historic buildings and landscape, historic life-skills demonstrations, NPS passport cancellation, restrooms, trails nearby. Millbrook Village is located in New Jersey, approximately 11 miles north of I-80 via Old Mine Road and approximately 30 miles south of I-84 via River Road and Old Mine Road. Millbrook is also near Blairstown, NJ and is located just 6 miles northwest of Blairstown by way of Millbrook Road/Route 602. Located in Hardwick, New Jersey; GPS: 41.073524, -74.963349 Park Headquarters Temporarily Closed due to construction. Visitor services and information have been relocated to Bushkill Meeting Center. Park headquarters is located approximately 8.5 miles north of I-80 and approximately 21 miles south of I-84 on River Road in Pennsylvania. US-209 intersects with River Road and can be easily accessed from both I-80 and I-84. Located in Bushkill, PA; GPS: 41.070196, -75.017518 Dingmans Campground Dingmans Campground is a 136-site rustic campground located in Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania. Dingmans Campground offers a variety of settings with campsites along the river, forest campsites, as well as RV, water, and electric campsites. Group campsites for 20 to 40 people available. Camping is available from April until October most years. Telephone 570-828-1551 for details. RV Campsite RV parked at a wooded campsite Water and 20/30 amp electric services are available as select sites. Campsite empty wooded campsite 136 campsites are available at Dingmans Campground. Mohican Outdoor Center Primitive group campsites in a wooded setting adjacent to the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in New Jersey; Drinking water available; Call 603-466-2727 for additional information regarding lodge or cabin rentals. Mohican Outdoor Center Campground view of pond with pink mountain laurel flowers in the foreground Campsites are nestled in the trees near Catfish Pond. Rivers Bend Group Campground Five (5) Primitive group campsites for parties of up to 15 people per site, in an open area with some trees next to and above the river; drinking water available; minimum of five people required to reserve site. Parking available for up to six vehicles per site. Rivers Bend Group Campsite Fee 70.00 Sites are for groups only. Each site can host approximately 5 to 25 people. Rivers Bend Group Campground view of the river from campground Nestled on a hill above the river, Rivers Bend Group Campground provides a peaceful spot for groups to enjoy their park visit. Rivers Bend Group Campground Open Area Image of the large open area found at Rivers Bend Group Campground Rivers Bend Group Campground Great Area Rivers Bend Group Campground Campsite Number Two One of the group campsites showing fire pit to the front and and bear proof trash cans to the right Rivers Bend Group Campsite Number Two Rivers Bend Group campground Entrance The entrance of Rivers Bend Group Campground shows a driveway into the woods and a sign to the right Entrance to Rivers Bend Group Campground from Old Mine Road Rivers Bend Group campground Flag Pole Image of an open area with a flag pole in the center and some small benches behind. Rivers Bend Group Campground Flag Pole Area Valley View Group Campground Currently Closed Primitive group campsites in an open area with some trees next to the river; drinking water available; minimum of five people required to reserve site. Only Site One is handicap accessible. Valley View Group Campground wooded group campsite Valley View Group Campground is conveniently located along the river near Bushkill, PA. Delaware Water Gap View of the Delaware River cutting between two low mountain peaks The Delaware Water Gap is the geologic formation that gives the park its name. This distinctive cut thru the Kittatinny ridgeline was made by the Delaware River over thousands of years. Fulmer Falls A waterfall flows toward the viewer along a rocky riverbed. Fulmer Falls is the second of three waterfalls in George W. Childs Park Millbrook Days A woman braids rye straw for hatmaking A woman braids rye straw for hatmaking River View from Mount Tammany a snaking river view from a mountain top High view of the Delaware River from atop Mount Tammany Nesting Great Blue Herons Great Blue Herons attending their nests in a tree Great Blue Herons attend their nests in a tree Dingmans Falls A strongly running Dingmans Falls waterfall surrounded by plants. Dingmans Falls in summer, as seen from the wheelchair and stroller accessible boardwalk Silver Thread Falls Tall and narrow, Silver Thread Falls Silver Thread Falls, as seen from the Dingmans Falls Boardwalk The Delaware Water Gap: A Window Into Earth’s Early Oceans The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA), straddling the lower Delaware River along northwestern New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania, boasts extensive ancient reefs. These reefs showcase prehistoric marine life that predates the dinosaurs of the Mesozoic Era by 200 million years. A cross section of a preserved reef Partnerships add a Charge to your Travel Plans The National Park Service, the National Park Foundation, BMW of North America, the U.S. Department of Energy, concessioners, and gateway communities have collaborated to provide new technologies for travel options to and around national parks. As part of this public-private partnership, BMW of North America, working through the National Park Foundation, donated and arranged for the installation of 100 electric vehicle (EV) charging ports in and around national parks. Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Monitoring Program Yields Insights into Forest Health in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area From a mountaintop vista in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, forests spread across the Delaware River Valley. This vast sea of green is a complex ecosystem that provides habitat for countless plants, animals, fungi, and insects. Understanding the current condition of park forests and how the forests are changing is critical to long-term management of park ecosystems. Mountaintop view of a green, heavily forested landscape Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Treats 800 Acres with Prescribed Fire In 2014 Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area used prescribed fire to treat 800 acres across 12 burn units to maintain open space, reduce hazardous fuels, and restore the cultural landscape. The burn also contributed to the park’s natural resource management goal to provide early successional habitat for grassland birds such as bobolink and grasshopper sparrows, various insect species, and upland game bird species such as wild turkey. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. delaware water gap divides the ridge line Student Volunteers Plant 150 Chestnut Seedlings at DEWA On Monday April 27, 2019, an enthusiastic group of student volunteers and their teacher from the Wallenpaupack Area High School (WAHS) Eco-Team helped with a restoration project at Dingmans Falls in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. DEWA Reels In New Volunteers for Fishing Line Recycling Program A woman disposes of fishing line in a recycle bin at Delaware Water Gap National Recreational Area, placed there by members of the Pennsylvania chapter of the Backcountry Hunters and Anglers (BHA). Crystal Clear: Installing Four Continuous Water Quality Monitors Near Delaware River Basin Marcellus Shale Development National Park Service Delaware River parks collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Centers in New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey on a USGS/NPS Water Quality Partnership technical assistance proposal to install four continuous water quality monitors near Delaware River Basin Marcellus Shale development. This project was selected for funding in 2012. green trees reflected in still blue river water 2011 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Meet the six winner of the 2011 Hartzog Awards, which celebrates the amazing contributions of volunteers to our national parks. Youth volunteer The Future of Our Oak Forests: Can Fire and Fences Sustain Oak Forests for the Future? Oak-dominated forests are an important resource in the Appalachian Mountains, covering vast areas of the dry ridgetops and mesic hillsides. However, the future of these forests is uncertain due to the lack of regeneration that would form the future oak trees. Person crouched beside a forest health monitoring plot, recording data Rare Riparian Plant Communities at Delaware Water Gap Different types of bedrock, the shape of the river channel, the timing of floods, and scouring by winter ice create unique environmental settings where rare riparian plant communities occur. Calcareous Riverside Outcrop and Calcareous Riverside Seep are two globally rare riparian communities that co-occur together at Dingmans Ferry and two other sites within Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Lush riparian prairie alongside a gently flowing river Bat Projects in Parks: Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Monitoring bats across New Jersey and Pennsylvania in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Dingmans Creek waterfall in Delaware Water Gap Zehra Osman Zehra Osman has been a Landscape Architect with the National Park Service since 2001. Through her work at a variety of parks around the country, Zehra explores how cultural landscape documentation and research contributes to historic preservation and planning projects. A smiling woman in a green NPS uniform with arms crossed Forest Health in a Regional Context Eight Inventory and Monitoring networks have been collaborating on forest health monitoring since 2005. Participants include 61 national parks in the eastern United States. As a result of this collaboration, vegetation data are collected in similar ways, which allows us to compare various parks across the region. One person on the forest floor collecting data, while another records the data So Many Mushrooms! It started as a personal project. Biological technician Sarah Daugherty would be out collecting data for the Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network’s forest health monitoring program, and notice so many cool mushrooms. She started taking photos and jotting down what she saw. Soon, she noticed that many of the species she was finding weren't on park species lists. Discussing her discoveries with her colleagues, everyone agreed that a more formal fungi inventory was in order. Mushrooms of different colors, shapes, and sizes, laid out next to each other on a floor 2019 Weather In Review: Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area In all, 2019 was very wet and warm at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. The year ended as the 14th wettest and 15th warmest since 1895. Dark storm clouds gathering over the Delaware River. Silent Witnesses, Old Trees are Hiding in Our Midst An article about old trees in Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network (ERMN) parks. ERMN scientists have collected cores from two "average" looking canopy trees adjacent to every permanent long-term forest health monitoring plot in network parks. Of the 700 trees cored, over 60 of them hovered near 200 years old. A woman uses an increment borer to take a core sample from a tree. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Archeology ABCs Coloring Book Archeology paints a colorful picture of the past! Download and print this full coloring book packed with archeological objects from A to Z! Title page for coloring book entitled Archeology ABCs Coloring Book Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 11, No. 2, Fall 2019 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> devils tower Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Silurian Period—443.8 to 419.2 MYA Excellent exposures and well-preserved fossils in Silurian rocks of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve provide clues to the timing of the assembly of Alaska’s assembly from a variety of continental fragments. fossil corals in a rock matrix Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix 2020 Weather In Review: Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area experienced an extremely warm 2020 with precipitation that was near normal. The year ended as the 3rd warmest and 58th wettest on record (since 1895). Rainbow over the Delaware River. Plan Like a Ranger for your visit to Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area An image of Mount Tammany, taken from the Arrow Island Overlook, showing the layers of rock that make up the Kittatinny Ridge. This is the home of the famous Red Dot Trail, as well as the first section of Appalachian Trail in New Jersey. Mount Tammany from the side exposing layers upon layers of rock amongst the spring canopy of leaves

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