"Twisted Rock under a summer sky." by NPS/Michael Thomas , public domain

Dinosaur

National Monument - CO, UT

Dinosaur National Monument is located on the southeast flank of the Uinta Mountains on the border between Colorado and Utah at the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Dinosaur National Monument (NM) in Colorado and Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Dinosaur - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Dinosaur National Monument (NM) in Colorado and Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/dino/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinosaur_National_Monument Dinosaur National Monument is located on the southeast flank of the Uinta Mountains on the border between Colorado and Utah at the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers. Dinosaurs once roamed here. Their fantastic remains are still visibly embedded in the rocks. Today, the mountains, desert, and untamed rivers flowing in deep canyons support an array of life. Petroglyphs hint at earlier cultures. Later, homesteaders and outlaws found refuge here. Whether your passion is science, adventure, history or scenery, Dinosaur offers much to explore. Dinosaur National Monument is located on the Colorado and Utah border with a parts of the monument in both states. Dinosaur fossils are not visible in the Colorado portion of the monument - only on the Utah side. The Quarry Visitor Center and Exhibit Hall (where you see the dinosaur fossils) are located approximately 7 miles north of Jensen, Utah. Canyon Visitor Center - Colorado Located near Dinosaur, Colorado, at the base of the Harpers Corner Road, the Canyon Visitor Center is the gateway to the monument's mountains and river canyons. This building is open daily in summer and is closed during the winter. Exhibits and a park film orient visitors to resources, and staff are available to answer questions. A bookstore sells items that can further enhance your experience. Restrooms and water are available seasonally. There are no dinosaur fossil sites on this side of the park. Located on US Hwy 40, two miles east of Dinosaur, CO. Quarry Exhibit Hall - Utah The Quarry Exhibit Hall is where you can see a wall of approximately 1,500 dinosaur bones. This includes the remains of numerous species, such as Allosaurus, Apatosaurus, Camarasaurus, Diplodocus, and Stegosaurus. Exhibits, including an 80 foot (24 m) long mural, reveal the story of the many animals that lived in the Morrison environment during the Late Jurassic. This building is open year-round, except on certain holidays. Open hours change seasonally. Quarry Visitor Center - Utah Located 7 miles (11 km) north of Jensen, Utah, off Highway 149, the Quarry Visitor Center is the gateway to the Quarry Exhibit Hall and the wall of dinosaur bones. This facility features a staffed information desk, gift shop, and theater with a 12-minute park film. Exhibits introduce a variety of resources and places to explore within the monument. During summer, shuttle buses depart from here for the Quarry Exhibit Hall. This building is open year-round, except on certain holidays. Hours change seasonally. From US Highway 40 in Jensen, Utah, take Utah State Highway 149 7 miles north into the monument. The turn to the visitor center parking lot is just past the entrance station. Deerlodge Park Campground Deerlodge Park Campground is located 53 miles (85 km) east of the Canyon Visitor Center. It is located on the Yampa River at the boat ramp at the head of Yampa Canyon. It has seven shady sites suitable for tents. The sites have tables and fire pits. There is drinking water and vault toilets available seasonally, but no showers. Deerlodge Park Campground is open year-round, but winter access can be very difficult due to snow. When the Yampa River exceeds an 18,000 cfs flow rate, the campground will flood. Summer Fee when water is available 10.00 Summer fee Campground Off Season fee when water is not available 6.00 Campground Off Season fee when water is not available Deerlodge Park Campground Sign with Walk In Campsites in front of grassy field surrounded by tall trees Entrance to walk in campsites at Deerlodge Park Campground Campsite at Deerlodge Park Campground A dirt path leads to a campsite with picnic table underneath tall trees. A shaded campsite at the Deerlodge Park Campground Echo Park Campground Situated along the Green River at the base of towering cliffs, the Echo Park Campground provides a unique camping experience in Dinosaur National Monument. Steamboat Rock dominates the view. Fremont petroglyphs are located on the canyon walls. Bighorn sheep and mule deer frequently roam through the campground. Unimproved hiking trails lead to the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers or to views of the Mitten Park Fault. The campground is located 38 miles (61 km) north of the Canyon Visitor Center. Summer Camping Fee 10.00 Summer fee when water is available. Winter Camping Fee 6.00 Camping Fee when water is not available Group Site 15.00 One reservable group site is located at Echo Park Campground. Reservations can be made at Recreation.gov. Echo Park Campground A blue tent sits in an open field with a pinnacle of rock in the background Campsites in Echo Park provide views of the surrounding scenery. Echo Park Cooking Area A fire grate beside a log for sitting in the Echo Park Campground. All fires must be built inside the fire grates provided at the campground. Echo Park Campsite A campsite equipped with a fire pit and picnic table. Campsites at Echo Park Campground are equipped with picnic tables and fire grates. Echo Park Camper A truck-top camper in the Echo Park Campground. While RVs and trailers are prohibited, high-clearance vans and trucks with camper tops are allowed in Echo Park Camprgound. Gates of Lodore Campground Gates of Lodore Campground is located on the Green River at the boat ramp at the head of Lodore Canyon. The campground is 106 miles (171 km) north of the Canyon Visitor Center. The campground is popular with river rafters who often stay here before launching on the Green River. There are 19 sites, some with shade. The sites have tables and fire pits. During the summer, there is running water and vault toilets, but no showers. The campsites can accommodate tents and RVs (but there are no hook-ups). Standard Campground Fee - Peak Season 10.00 This is the fee collected when water is available in the campground. Campground Fee for Senior and Access Pass Holders - Peak Season 5.00 Campground fee for holders of a valid Senior or Access Pass Campground Fee - Low Use Season 6.00 This is the standard fee during the off season when water is not available. Campground Fee for Senior and Access Pass Holders - Low Use Season 3.00 Campground fee when water is not available for holders of valid Senior and Access Passes Gates of Lodore on the Green River River flowing towards mountains The Green River flows towards the entrance to the Canyon of the Lodore which is a short distance down the river from the Gates of Lodore Campground Gates of Lodore Campground Campsite 19 campsite with picnic table and tree Campsite 19 in the Gates of Lodore Campground Gates of Lodore Campground - Campsite 5 Picnic table and tree in campsite Campsite 5 in the Gates of Lodore Campground Gates of Lodore Campground Map Map showing the Gates of Lodore Campround Gates of Lodore Campground Map Green River Campground The Green River Campground is located along the banks of the Green River in a grove of cottonwood trees at an elevation of 4795 (4162 feet). The highly eroded Split Mountain towers to the north of the campground. The famous dinosaur quarry, where you can see 150 million year old dinosaur bones still encased in rock is approximately 5 miles (8 km) from the campground. Nearby is the Split Mountain Boat Ramp where river rafters come off the Green River after trips through Dinosaur National Monument's canyons. Campsite Fee 18.00 Fee per site, per night. A maximum of 8 people are allowed in each site. Campsite Fee - Senior or Access Pass Holder 9.00 Senior or Access Pass Holders qualify for a 50% discount off of the regular campsite fee Fall in the Green River Campground Trees with yellow leaves stand above campsites with a rocky mountain in the background. Fall brings a hint of color to the cottonwood trees in the Green River Campground Visitor in Green River Campground A woman sitting in a chair in front of a tent The Green River Campground provides views of Split Mountain. Enjoying Peace in Green River Campground A woman reads a book in a chair in front of a yellow tent Situated in a cottonwood grove, many sites provide shady respites in the Green River Campground. Green River Campground Map map showing the layout of campsites in the campground A map showing the layout of the Green River Campground Rainbow Park Campground Rainbow Park Campground is 28 miles (45 km) from the Quarry Visitor Center in the Utah portion of the monument. It is located on a dirt road that is impassable when wet. The campground sits beside the Green River near the Rainbow Park Boat Ramp at the head of Split Mountain Canyon. Rainbow Park Campground is open year-round, but there is no winter maintenance on the unpaved road. Rainbow Park Camping Fee 6.00 Year round camping fee for Rainbow Park Campground Rainbow Park Campsite Picnic table and tent at a campsite with a river in the background. Campsite at Rainbow Park Campground Rainbow Park Picnic Table and Fire Pit A picnic table and fire grate in the Rainbow Park Campground. Each campsite is equipped with a picnic table and fire grate. Self-Registration & Information Kiosk A shaded wooden kiosk with park information beside some trash receptacles. Register and check current fire restrictions at the information kiosk. Rainbow Park in Late Fall Snow-covered canyons at Rainbow Park in late Fa;; Although open year-round, Rainbow Park Campground is typically inaccessible in winter. Split Mountain Group Campground The Split Mountain Group Campground is located along the banks of the Green River at an elevation of 4800 feet (1463 m) near the foot of Split Mountain. The campground is 5 miles (8 km) from the dinosaur quarry, where you can see 150 million year old dinosaur bones encased in the rock. Beside the campground is the Split Mountain Boat Ramp where rafters and boaters come off the Green River. During the off season, when the Green River Campground is closed, the Split Mountain Campground is open to all campers. Group Site Fee - Main Season 40.00 Fee per site, per night for Split Mountain Group Campground. No discount for Senior or Access Passes. Split Mountain Camping Fee - Off-season 6.00 Camping fee during the winter when water is not available and the Green River Campground is closed View of the Split Mountain Group Campground view of a campground along a river Located along the Green River at the foot of Split Mountain, the Split Mountain Group Campground provides a stunning setting for camping. Split Mountain Campground Map Map showing the layout of the Split Mountain Campground and area features. Map for the Split Mountain Campground Camarasaurus Skull the fossilized skull of camarasaurus dinosaur Over 1500 fossilized bones of various dinosaurs are still embedded in the cliff face including a skull and several neck vertebrae of a camarasaurus Camarasaurus Hump Specimen Large bones resembling legs, ribs and the vertebrae of a neck embed grayish brown rock. Fossils from a camarasaurus dinosaur display the well articulated specimens still found in the rock in the Quarry Exhibit Hall. Steamboat Rock and the Green River in Echo Park the rocky pinnacle of Steamboat Rock rises over the Green River Steamboat Rock rises above the Green River in Echo Park McKee Springs Petroglyphs Fremont rock art at McKee Springs The Fremont people left petroglyphs on many of the rock cliffs within Dinosaur National Monument including those at McKee Springs Mitten Park from Harpers Corner view of a river flowing through a deep canyon Hikers arriving at the end of the Harpers Corner Trail are rewarded with a view of the Mitten Park Fault, Green River and the Yampa River Canyons Night Sky over Tent the star filled sky above a tent Dinosaur's dark skies provides dramatic views of the Milky Way Galaxy Rocky Mountain Bighorns A bighorn sheep lamb stands in front of a bighorn ewe. Visitors to Dinosaur may also see its diversity of wildlife including Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. Floating Rapids A green rubber raft floats over a rapid on a brown colored river in front of multi-colored mountains Rapids like those in Split Mountain Canyon challenge and thrill rafters on the Green River. National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. Desert Varnish Ever wondered what those dark lines were on the rock walls of canyon country? These black, brown, and red streaks are called desert varnish. streaks of black desert varnish on a red rock wall Interagency Cooperation is Key to Wildland Fire Response in Northern Colorado and Utah Aerial photo of the DINO HQ Fire Aerial photo of the DINO HQ Fire Landbird Monitoring in Northern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 2018 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2018. Small, bright-orange bird with yellowish underfeathers. Predicting Vegetation and Topographic Change in Response to Altered River Flows on the Northern Colorado Plateau Lots of things can impact the quality of your raft trip. Weather. Water levels. Packing the right (or wrong) gear. But would you expect plants to play a role? Riparian plants influence the shape and character of rivers—and river flow helps determine what grows where. This model can help river managers predict the downstream effects of shifts in flow, and respond accordingly. The model was tested in Dinosaur National Monument. A person stands near four rafts pulled up onshore near a river camp. Traits, Tradeoffs, and Pivot Points: How Climate, Plant, and Soil Properties Affect Vegetation Growth on the Northern Colorado Plateau As the northern Colorado Plateau heads into a hotter, drier future, there will be ecological winners and losers. Figuring out how different vegetation communities will fare is tricky. A recent study aimed to identify which vegetation communities might come out ahead, which might lag behind, and what might make the difference. Desert grassland in red rock setting. Pink wildflowers grow in foreground as storm brews in the sky. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado and Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. fossils in quarry wall 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Northern Colorado Plateau Park Waters Pesticides, antibiotics, and personal care products are all being found in streams and rivers. But would you expect to find them in a national park? On the northern Colorado Plateau, scientists found that even in isolated areas, these "contaminants of emerging concern" are not uncommon. Find out what we found where--and how you can help. Ripples in cave water Geoscientists-in-the-Parks: Quarry Mapping interns Read about the work Thea Kinyon Boodhoo (GIP), Elliott Smith (GIP), Marie Jimenez (Mosaics in Science intern), and Trinity Stirling (GIP) did at Dinosaur National Monument, Utah as GIPs in 2015. 4 interns on large quarry wall in visitor center Preventative Conservation of an 'Allosaurus' skull from Dinosaur National Monument Collaboration between professional paleontology staff in two national parks helped with restoration of an important dinosaur specimen. The skull of 'Allosaurus fragilis' from Dinosaur National Monument, Utah, was recently sent to Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, for professional conservation by the curatorial staff. two people working on a fossil Park Paleontologist Retires After 38 years serving as the paleontologist at Dinosaur National Monument, Dan Chure retires from the National Park Service in 2017. Dan is recognized for his many contributions to the paleontology at Dinosaur National Monument and for the National Park Service. Dan will continue to conduct research and publish during his retirement. dan chure giving a presentation Dinosaur National Monument unites CSU’s ‘range’ of expertise In addition to its wealth of namesake fossils, Dinosaur National Monument also contains more than 200,000 acres of rangeland ecosystems that surround canyons carved by the Yampa and Green Rivers. The NPS/CSU partnership involves a team of CSU alumni, faculty, researchers and students evaluating Dinosaur National Monument’s rangeland health to create a snapshot of current land conditions. Pronghorn antelope in a field of sagebrush Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits What We’re Learning and Why it Matters: Long-Term Monitoring on the Northern Colorado Plateau Knowing which key natural resources are found in the national parks, and whether they're stable or changing, helps decisionmakers make sound choices. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network is building that knowledge. After more than ten years of monitoring, we've learned a lot about park ecosystems, how they're changing, and what they may look like in the days to come. Find out what we’ve learned and how it’s being used to help managers plan for the future. Man stands in a stream, looking down at a handheld gauge. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2019 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2019. Bald eagle Water Quality in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network: Water Years 2016–2018 Once a month, ecologists collect water samples at dozens of monitoring sites in and near ten National Park Service units across Utah and Colorado. This consistent, long-term monitoring helps alert managers to existing and potential problems. Find out the results for 2016-2018 in this brief from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network. A monitoring crew of three samples a clear river flowing over brown rock and sand A Closer Look at When Grasses Need a Drink: Soils, Precipitation, and Desert Grasses The results of a recent study may help land managers to prioritize grassland conservation and restoration efforts. Park managers can’t do much about climate, but with the right information, they can make choices based on how different grassland communities behave in different soil types. In this study, cool-season grasses showed more resilience to drought than warm-season grasses. A field crew member takes measurements on a grassland transect. Invasive Exotic Plants and River Regulation at Dinosaur National Monument At Dinosaur National Monument, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network investigated whether riparian areas of regulated rivers have more invasive plants than those of unregulated rivers. We found that while flow regulation does enhance invasion, it doesn’t tell the whole story. Raft on river below massive canyon wall The Science of Conserving Native Fish: Mitigating Potential Effects of Flow Experiments along the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument On the Green River, scientists are helping ensure that solving one problem doesn’t cause another for native fish. Analyzing long-term monitoring data collected in Dinosaur National Monument allowed them to suggest modifications to proposed experimental flows from Flaming Gorge Dam. The modifications may provide long-term benefits to Colorado pikeminnow. River camp and canyon wall Series: GIP Participants and Project Highlights [8 Articles] Participants selected for the GIP program have a unique opportunity to contribute to the conservation of America's national parks. Participants may assist with research, mapping, GIS analysis, resource monitoring, hazard mitigation, and education. GIP positions can last from 3 months to one-year. Robyn Henderek Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 1, Spring 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> two people standing outdoors near a fossil tree base Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 09, No. 2, Fall 2017 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> skull on the lawn at the national mall Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Triassic Period—251.9 to 201.3 MYA The brightly colored Triassic rocks of Petrified Forest National Park yield not only the petrified trees but many other plant and animal fossils. fossil footprint on stone Jurassic Period—201.3 to 145.0 MYA Dinosaur National Monument is home to thousands of dinosaur fossils making it a true “Jurassic Park.” A vast desert covered Southwest North America in the Jurassic, and ancient sand dunes now form tall cliffs in many parks including Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. dinosaur skull in rock face Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2020 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2020. Small beige bird with black beak and feet, brown back. Monitoring From Space: Using Satellite Imagery to Measure Landscape Conditions on the Ground Scientists from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network travel thousands of miles each year to collect data on plants, soils, and water across network parks. But it would be impossible to cover every square inch of the Northern Colorado Plateau with boots on the ground. Instead, we simultaneously monitor the parks with boots in space—satellite data that provide information at a much broader scale. Satellite and Earth in space Plan Like a Park Ranger - Top Tips For Visiting Dinosaur Plan like a Park Ranger - top tips for visiting Dinosaur National Monument. Dinosaur models sit on a rock with a ranger hat Localized Drought Impacts on Northern Colorado Plateau Landbirds Birds of the desert southwest, a climate-change hotspot, are among the most vulnerable groups in the US. To help park managers plan for those changes, scientists evaluated the influence of water deficit on landbird communities at 11 national parks in Utah and Colorado. The results will help land managers to focus conservation efforts on places where certain species are most vulnerable to projected climate changes. A man wearing a clipboard looks through binoculars at dawn in field of sagebrush Fantastic Camarasauruses (from Dinosaur National Monument) and Where to Find Them Paleontologist Rebecca Hunt-Foster shares scientific and historical information about one of the iconic dinosaurs from the Dinosaur National Monument quarry. fossil skeleton on display Invasive Exotic Plant Monitoring at Dinosaur National Monument Invasive exotic plants are one of the most significant threats to natural resources in the national parks today. To provide early warning of weed invasions, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network monitors target plants in park areas where they are likely to first establish: along roads, trails, and waterways. Find out what we learned at Dinosaur National Monument in 2019. People in rafts float down a river with red cliffs vegetated with green shrubs Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: ReBecca Hunt-Foster Paleontologist, ReBecca Hunt-Foster is responsible for maintaining the unique fossil collection at Dinosaur National Monument. Excavating these one-of-a-kind specimens is an important process, but so is cleaning and maintaining them. Read more about how ReBecca is highlighting this often overlooked process and her story. This article is part of Dare to Imagine, a National Park Foundation grant-funded project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers. graphic of a woman in uniform text reads ReBecca Hunt-Foster Paleontologist Battle of the Bark Trees shade us from the sun, provide homes for wildlife, stabilize Earth’s surface, and produce food for humans and animals alike. Some are massive, and others are miniscule by comparison, but what makes one better than the other—we’ll let you decide! Check out our iconic trees below and find your favorite! Five thick barked red-brown trees are backlit by the sunlight.

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