"The Ferry House and Straight of Juan de Fuca" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Ebey's Landing

National Historical Reserve - Washington

The Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve is a rural historic district, that preserves and protects an unbroken historical record of Puget Sound exploration and settlement from the 19th century to the present. Historic farms, still under cultivation in the prairies of Whidbey Island, reveal land use patterns unchanged since settlers claimed the land in the 1850s under the Donation Land Claim Act. The nearby seaport community of Coupeville, one of the oldest towns in Washington, is included in the reserve. Also included are both Fort Casey State Park and Fort Ebey State Park, as well as a section of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail. The Central Whidbey Island Historic District, with the Sergeant Clark House and the Coupeville grain wharf, is part of the National Historical Reserve and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Other protected lands within the reserve include the Admiralty Inlet Natural Area Preserve.

maps

Official visitor map of Ebey's Landing National Historic Reserve (NHR) in Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Ebey's Landing - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Ebey's Landing National Historic Reserve (NHR) in Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the Kettles Trails and Fort Ebey State Park (SP) on Whidbey Island. Published by the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance.Fort Ebey State Park - Kettles Trails

Map of the Kettles Trails and Fort Ebey State Park (SP) on Whidbey Island. Published by the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance.

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/ebla/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebey%27s_Landing_National_Historical_Reserve The Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve is a rural historic district, that preserves and protects an unbroken historical record of Puget Sound exploration and settlement from the 19th century to the present. Historic farms, still under cultivation in the prairies of Whidbey Island, reveal land use patterns unchanged since settlers claimed the land in the 1850s under the Donation Land Claim Act. The nearby seaport community of Coupeville, one of the oldest towns in Washington, is included in the reserve. Also included are both Fort Casey State Park and Fort Ebey State Park, as well as a section of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail. The Central Whidbey Island Historic District, with the Sergeant Clark House and the Coupeville grain wharf, is part of the National Historical Reserve and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Other protected lands within the reserve include the Admiralty Inlet Natural Area Preserve. This stunning landscape at the gateway to Puget Sound, with its rich farmland and promising seaport, lured the earliest American pioneers north of the Columbia River to Ebey’s Landing. Today Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve preserves the historical, agricultural and cultural traditions of both Native and Euro-American – while offering spectacular opportunities for recreation. Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve is on Whidbey Island in the Puget Sound. The island is easily accessible from the mainland by vehicle via Washington State Route 20 from Burlington and aboard the Washington State Ferries from either Mukilteo or Port Townsend. Fort Casey State Park Washington State Parks operates two campgrounds in the Reserve. You can find information and reservations at http://www.parks.wa.gov/. Reservations are strongly recommended, especially during the summer months. Fort Ebey State Park Washington State Parks operates two campgrounds in the Reserve. You can find information and reservations at http://www.parks.wa.gov/. Reservations are strongly recommended, especially during the summer months. View from the Bluff Overlook View from the Bluff Overlook The Bluff Overlook on the Bluff Trail offers spectacular views of the Straight of Juan de Fuca Sunrise over Admiralty Bay Sunrise over Admiralty Bay Admiralty Bay in Fort Casey State Park offers spectacular views of Mt Rainier and the Olympic Mountains. Mt Baker and the historic Smith Barn Mt Baker and the historic Smith Barn The views from the prairie overlook tell a story of farming and community that stretches back for centuries. Sunrise Over a Prairie Farm Sunrise over the prairie. Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve exists to preserve a working rural farm community. Historic Ferry House Historic Ferry House The Ferry House sits in the heart of the Reserve, a testament to the community that calls this place home. North Coast and Cascades Network Exotic Plant Management Team The North Coast and Cascades Network Exotic Plant Management Team (NCCN EPMT) manages a diverse array of exotic plants across the dramatic landscapes of the Pacific Northwest. The team works with partner parks and agencies to augment vegetation management across the network. People loading weed control equipment into the back of a vehicle NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] rural park landscape Bees of the North Coast & Cascades Bees are some of the most abundant and important pollinators in the world – especially in mountainous environments. Despite the importance of bees in our natural environments, many national parks do not know what species live within their boundaries. In 2016, to celebrate the Centennial of the National Park Service, North Coast and Cascades national parks focused on inventories of pollinators, including bees. Macro photo of the metallic blue head of a mason bee 1997–1998 El Niño / 1998–1999 La Niña Wind-driven waves and abnormally high sea levels contributed to hundreds of millions of dollars in flood and storm damage in the San Francisco Bay region, including Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. In addition to California, the 1997–1998 El Niño and the following 1998–1999 La Niña severely impacted the Pacific Northwest, including many National Park System units. colorful ocean surface mapping image Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Bat Projects in Parks: North Coast Cascades Network Eleven bat species occur in North Coast Cascades Network Parks. Each species is unique, except that they're all facing threats of some kind in their environments. Learn more about how scientists study bats and what you can do to help. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Coastal Geomorphology—Storms of Record Storms can bring about significant coastal change as well as substantial economic damage and loss in the human environment. Read about a few storms of interest that have since made history due to their unique intensity, characteristics, or impacts. aerial view of a major storm along the northwest coast of the united states and canada Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park

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