"Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site" by NPS / Victoria Stauffenberg , public domain

Edgar Allan Poe

National Historic Site - Pennsylvania

The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site is a preserved home once rented by American author Edgar Allan Poe, located at 532 N. 7th Street, in the Spring Garden neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Though Poe lived in many houses over several years in Philadelphia (1837 to 1844), it is the only one which still survives.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/edal/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Allan_Poe_National_Historic_Site The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site is a preserved home once rented by American author Edgar Allan Poe, located at 532 N. 7th Street, in the Spring Garden neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Though Poe lived in many houses over several years in Philadelphia (1837 to 1844), it is the only one which still survives. Described as horrifying, mystifying, and brilliant, Poe’s writing has engaged readers all over the globe. The six years Edgar Allan Poe lived in Philadelphia were his happiest and most productive. Yet Poe also struggled with bad luck, personal demons and his wife’s illness. In Poe’s humble home, reflect on the human spirit surmounting crushing obstacles, and celebrate Poe’s astonishing creativity. The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site is located at 532 N. 7th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19123. It sits in an urban area served by Interstates 95 and 676. On- street parking is usually available near the site. The site is also easily accessible by public transportation. See the directions web page for more information. Poe House, exterior Color photo of a rectangular three story brick home with rows of windows on each floor. Edgar Allan Poe lived in Philadelphia for six years, but he resided at this home for about a year, 1843-1844. Parlor Color photo of the parlor in the Poe House showing illustrations of furniture on the walls. Wall mounted illustrations show how the room may have been furnished when Edgar Allan Poe lived in the house. Basement Color photo of the basement with brick floor, false chimney, and wooden staircase. Is this where Poe got his inspiration for "The Black Cat?" Descend to the basement and decide for yourself. Raven statue Color photo showing a large raven statue with wings outspread on a metal plinth. Stand in the shadow of the raven statue in the yard. The Reading Room A small red-carpeted room with faux marble table, red upholstered chairs and sofa, and red curtains. The Reading Room at the Edgar Allan Poe National Historical Site is furnished according to Poe's satirical essay "The Philosophy of Furniture." Edgar Allan Poe and Literary Criticism Edgar Allan Poe first gained recognition for his witty literary reviews. He constructed his own set of standards for American writers and was an early adopter of the belief that the quality of work should speak for itself without taking into account the writer's background. Black and white portrait etching of Edgar Allan Poe. Edgar Allan Poe Invents the Modern Detective Story Poe was not the first to write mysteries, but he inspired later writers by introducing aspects that are now considered classic elements of detective fiction. Black and white drawing of Edgar Allan Poe. Edgar Allan Poe Pioneers Science Fiction Edgar Allan Poe's writing delved into themes of time travel, space, and the perils of scientific developments long before science fiction was an established genre. Black and white etching of hot air balloons in the sky. Edgar Allan Poe and His Tales of Horror Edgar Allan Poe mastered the horror genre, using first-person narration and descriptive language to explore the intricacies of the human mind. Black and white drawing of a black cat with a snarl. Edgar Allan Poe and His Tumultuous Romances After the death of his wife, Edgar Allan Poe had a number of romances. These women all honored his memory in some way after his untimely death. Black and white image of a young woman with short, dark hair. 2012 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2012, seven rangers were awarded the national and region Freeman Tilden Awards for innovative and exciting interpretive programs. Learn their stories and more about their award-winning programs. Renee Albertoli Poe's Philadelphia When Poe arrived in Philadelphia, he found a city in transition due to the industrial revolution and racial tensions, but also a city full of intellectual and recreational opportunities. Colored print showing pedestrians in front of a white Greek Revival style building. Poe's Character Under Attack After Poe's death, Rufus Griswold launched an attack against Poe's character that became accepted as fact and was passed down throughout the years. Black and white engraved portrait of Rufus Griswold. The Mystery of Edgar Allan Poe's Death Edgar Allan Poe died in October 1849 in Baltimore, but the circumstances surrounding his death remain a mystery over a century later. Color image of a monument on Edgar Allan Poe's grave. More to Explore at Your National Parks When someone asks how many National Parks are there, they are thinking about the "big" parks such as the Grand Canyon or Yosemite. If you ask a National Park Service Park Ranger the answer probably be for the whole system. This article explores some of the historic and cultural sites in the National Park Service including James A. Garfield National Historic Site! brick path leading to a large white house and a tree is in front of the house with branches

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