"Marching Bear Mounds in Summer" by NPS Photo , public domain

Effigy Mounds

National Monument - Iowa

Effigy Mounds National Monument preserves more than 200 prehistoric mounds built by Native Americans. Numerous effigy mounds are shaped like animals, including bears and birds. These were built mostly in the first millennium, by peoples of the Woodland Culture. As of 2017, they have been featured on the US quarter. The monument is located primarily in Allamakee County, with a small part in Clayton County, Iowa, in the midwestern United States. The park's visitor center is located in Harpers Ferry, Iowa, just north of Marquette.

maps

Official visitor map of Effigy Mounds National Monument (NM) in Iowa. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Effigy Mounds - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Effigy Mounds National Monument (NM) in Iowa. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/efmo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effigy_Mounds_National_Monument Effigy Mounds National Monument preserves more than 200 prehistoric mounds built by Native Americans. Numerous effigy mounds are shaped like animals, including bears and birds. These were built mostly in the first millennium, by peoples of the Woodland Culture. As of 2017, they have been featured on the US quarter. The monument is located primarily in Allamakee County, with a small part in Clayton County, Iowa, in the midwestern United States. The park's visitor center is located in Harpers Ferry, Iowa, just north of Marquette. The mounds preserved here are considered sacred by many Americans, especially the Monument's 20 culturally associated American Indian tribes. A visit offers opportunities to contemplate the meanings of the mounds and the people who built them. The 200 plus American Indian mounds are located in one of the most picturesque sections of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. Located 3 miles north of Marquette, Iowa on Hwy 76. Visitor Center Park entrance is on the north side of Hwy 76 as it winds through the country hillside in Northeast Iowa. Be careful on narrow roads with little to no shoulder. Located 3 miles north of Marquette, Iowa on Hwy 76. Marching Bear in Spring Bear Effigy Mounds with visitor walking nearby. Marching Bear Mound Group in summer. Scenic Overlook at Fire Point Scenic view of the steep bluffs adjacent to the Mississippi River as trees start to change color. Scenic overlook from the popular Fire Point Trail overlooking the Mississippi River and Driftless area bluffs. Mounds on a Foggy Morning Three conical mounds in a foggy morning setting. Three Conical mounds along the Fire Point Trail during a foggy morning. Conical Mounds Leading to Fire Point Circular mounds in a single line. Follow a line of conical mounds that will lead you out to Fire Point which overlooks the Mississippi River. Bear Mound View from the air of a mound covered in short green vegetation with forest behind. A bear mound visible along the park's North Unit trail. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] view of river and hanging rock overlook Bat Projects in Parks: Effigy Mounds National Monument Learn about bats in Effigy Mounds National Monument and some fun facts! A ranger uses acoustic equipment to locate bats in a forest Effigy Mounds National Monument: Tribal Collaboration for Landscape Management When the Cultural Landscape Report for Effigy Mounds National Monument was initiated in 2013, the process recognized the on-going significance of the landscape to existing Native American Tribes. Creation of this report, published in 2016, involved consultation with tribal partners to determine the best management practices for the landscape. This effort not only opened up a new chapter in planning for the park, but has also shaped an understanding of cultural association. Grass grows taller on low earth mounds, in a cleared space between trees. Wildland Fire in Tallgrass Prairie: Midwestern United States Prairies depend on fire to maintain the ecosystem stability and diversity. One benefit of fire in this community is the elimination of invasive plants, thereby helping to shape and maintain the prairie. Bison grazing in recently burned area. Wildland Fire in Oak Woodlands and Savannas of the Midwestern United States Oak woodlands depend on disturbances like fire to survive. Frequent fire created and maintained the open structure and make-up of the woodlands. Today, there are fewer oak woodlands across the central United States. Oak woodlands are converting into forests due to a lack of fire. Oak trees with an understory of grasses and forbs. Iowa: Effigy Mounds National Monument American Indian ceremonial mounds can be found in many different locations across the United States; however, only in northeastern Iowa, along the high bluffs and lowlands of the Upper Mississippi River Valley, have so many of these mounds been found in the shape of animal effigies. Established in 1949, Effigy Mounds National Monument preserves many examples of pre-contact American Indian mounds. Great Bear Mound The Bears of Effigy Mounds In the midwestern United States, early Native Americans built earthen mounds known today as effigy mounds. Marching Bear Group Exploring the Fire and Archeology Interface The Midwest Archeological Center (MWAC) worked with Midwest Region Fire Program to design and carry out experiments to collect information about the effects of fire on various classes of archeological materials. The goals of this project were to assess the fire/archeology interface to provide managers of Midwestern parks with information that will aid in decision-making concerning the stewardship of archeological and natural resources. Aquatic Invertebrate Community Monitoring at Effigy Mounds National Monument Aquatic invertebrate species are monitored at Effigy Mounds National Monument to evaluate water quality and ecological integrity within the park. Dousman Creek at Effigy Mounds National Monument Fish Communities at Effigy Mounds National Monument Scientists have been monitoring fish populations in Dousman Creek since 2008. They collect fish using a backpack electrofishing unit. Monitoring fish allows scientists to determine which species are in the park and how well they are doing in the streams. Dousman Creek at Effigy Mounds National Monument. Volunteer Bird Monitoring at Effigy Mounds National Monument Heartland Network staff and volunteers monitor birds within the park during the Spring-breeding season. Volunteers are key to the success of this monitoring effort as they are able to survey birds in years when the Heartland Network is not scheduled to do so. This allows Heartland staff to establish continuous records on bird population trends for the park. Northern Cardinal Bird Community Monitoring at Effigy Mounds National Monument Unchanging diversity, richness, and even distribution of individuals across species values suggest habitat on the park has remained similar across years and provides for a rich array of bird species. Bald Eagle at Effigy Mounds National Monument Goat Prairie Monitoring at Effigy Mounds National Monument Goat prairies are a unique kind of plant community found on the edges of bluffs where soils are shallow. Effigy Mounds National Monument has unique and diverse plant communities, including goat prairies, because of its geology, history, and location along the Mississippi River. The Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors goat prairies at the park to understand how they are changing in order to preserve them. Two people standing in low vegetation in an open area between trees at the edge of a bluff. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains

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