"Eisenhower Farm 1 Barn" by NPS , public domain

Eisenhower

National Historic Site - Pennsylvania

Eisenhower National Historic Site preserves the home and farm of Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States, and its surrounding property of 690.5 acres (279.4 ha). It is located in Cumberland Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania, just outside Gettysburg. Purchased by then-General Eisenhower and his wife Mamie in 1950, the farm served as a weekend retreat for the President and a meeting place for world leaders, and became the Eisenhowers' home after they left the White House in 1961.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Gettysburg National Military Park (NMP) in Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Gettysburg - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Gettysburg National Military Park (NMP) in Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/eise/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eisenhower_National_Historic_Site Eisenhower National Historic Site preserves the home and farm of Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States, and its surrounding property of 690.5 acres (279.4 ha). It is located in Cumberland Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania, just outside Gettysburg. Purchased by then-General Eisenhower and his wife Mamie in 1950, the farm served as a weekend retreat for the President and a meeting place for world leaders, and became the Eisenhowers' home after they left the White House in 1961. Eisenhower National Historic Site preserves the farm of General and 34th President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Adjacent to the Gettysburg battlefield, the farm served the president and first lady as a weekend retreat and as a meeting place for world leaders. With its peaceful setting and view of South Mountain, it was a respite from Washington, DC, and a backdrop for efforts to reduce Cold War tensions. As of July 6, 2020, the grounds of Eisenhower National Historic Site are open. The Eisenhower Home and Reception Center remain closed. Visitors may now drive directly to the farm. Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center The Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center is the best place to start your visit for both Gettysburg area national parks. Here you will find the National Park Service Information Desk, Visitor Center activities, ticket sales, Eisenhower National Historic Site shuttle bus information, Museum Bookstore, Refreshment Saloon and restrooms. Tickets for all activities may be purchased at the Ticket Sales counter in the Visitor Center. Eisenhower home The Eisenhower home with Ike's putting green in the foreground President Eisenhower was an avid golfer and had a putting green added to the backyard. Eisenhower Shuttlebus Visitors arrive at the site via the park shuttle bus Visitors arrive at the site via the park shuttle bus. The Eisenhower home in autumn The Eisenhower home in autumn The Eisenhower home in autumn. The Eisenhower living room The Eisenhower living room The Eisenhower living room. The Eisenhower dining room decorated for the holidays The Eisenhower dining room decorated for the holidays The Eisenhower dining room decorated for the holidays. Designing the Parks: Learning in Action The Designing the Parks program is not your typical internship. Each year since 2013, this program at the Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation has introduced a cohort of college students and recent graduates to NPS design and planning professions through projects related to cultural landscape stewardship. In the internships, made possible by partner organizations, participants focus on an in-depth project that directly engages with a national park unit. A group of young people stand on forest trail and listen to two maintenance employees Eisenhower National Historic Site Commemorates 75th Anniversary of D-Day Eisenhower National Historic Site commemorated the 75th anniversary of the 1944 “D-Day” Normandy landings commanded by General Dwight D. Eisenhower with a week-long series of special events held throughout Gettysburg. 11 Ways National Parks Influenced World War I (and vice versa) Uncover the hidden history of World War I in the national parks! A Renault tank and infantry move through a field General Dwight D. Eisenhower General Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), born in Texas to pacifist parents and a graduate of the West Point Class of 1915, was one of the most important American generals of World War II. He was best known by the nickname acquired while growing up in Abilene, Kansas - Ike. Allied Supreme Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower Curriculum Connections: Making the Most of National Park Experiences Developing curriculum-based programs is the cornerstone for a solid foundation for park education programs. Providing relevant resource-based experiences for people of all ages will ensure a continuum of opportunities for citizens to support their own learning objectives through the national parks and to find meaning in their national treasures. Offering curriculum-based programs, especially for school age children will help foster stewardship. Carriage roads at Acadia National Park. NPS Photo Gettysburg: the Power of Partnership For 28 years the Gettysburg Foundation has stood with the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of preservation, restoration, and education at Gettysburg National Military Park, assisting with ongoing preservation needs of the battlefield, the Soldiers’ National Cemetery, and the Eisenhower National Historic Site. Veteran Story: Tim Dolen The Mission Continues empowers veterans who are adjusting to life at home to find purpose through community impact. The non-profit deploys veterans on new missions in their communities, so that their actions will inspire future generations to serve. Tim Dolen started his six-month assignment on October 18, 2017 as Veteran Outreach Coordinator at Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site. The Mission Continues: Tim Dolen visits the park museum. He is standing next to the cannon exhibit. World War II Weekend at Eisenhower National Historic Site Eisenhower National Historic Site (EISE) hosted the 23rd annual World War II Weekend on September 21-22, 2019. Over 500+ living history volunteers were on site to interpret 50+ WWII military unit displays across the former cattle pastures once owned by the 34th President and Supreme Allied Commander of Allied Forces Europe, Dwight D. Eisenhower. Military units portrayed United States Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and Air Force. The Army's First Tank School: Camp Colt at Gettysburg While America ramped up to fight in World War I, Captain Dwight D. Eisenhower trained troops here in a new form of warfare that changed the battlefield forever. Infantry march behind a tank in a field of tall weeds NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Eisenhower National Historic Site, Pennsylvania Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. parkland and statue 2020 Weather In Review: Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site experienced a very warm and slightly dry 2020. In all, the year ended as the 10th warmest and 41st driest since 1895. A cannon overlooking a field and sunset at Gettysburg Battle of the Bulge Burials in Gettysburg National Cemetery One out of every ten American casualties fell during the Battle of the Bulge in the winter of 1944-1945, amounting to over 100,000 Americans killed, wounded, or missing. While the dead were initially interred overseas, many were brought home after the war at the request of their family members. Some of them were interred in the Gettysburg National Cemetery. snow covers a line of headstones, each marked with a wreath. World War II Burials in Gettysburg National Cemetery In the immediate aftermath of World War II, Gettysburg National Cemetery, the site of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and final resting place of over 3,500 Federal Civil War dead, expanded by over 500 burials as soldiers were brought back from overseas and buried closer to home. rows of military headstones with a backdrop of trees D-Day Burials in Gettysburg National Cemetery Gettysburg National Cemetery is the final resting place of over 500 WWII casualties, twelve of whom, all Pennsylvanians, lost their lives during the Normandy Landings--D-Day, June 6th, 1944. a row of US government-issue gravestones with American flags in front of them. The 1956 Presidential Election The 1956 presidential campaign, Eisenhower's bid for reelection involved a second term president facing a rematch of his earlier opponent, several foreign policy crises, and questions about the president's health. President Eisenhower cheers with his arms over his head. Secret Service Protection at the Eisenhower Farm Throughout Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidency, the Secret Service was a regular fixture at his personal residence and farm in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Once he retired, the Secret Service left, as former presidents at the time were not given lifetime protection. President Kennedy's assassination in 1963 changed Secret Service protection for presidents and former presidents forever. a farm lane with its gates open and a staffed guard booth on the left side. President Eisenhower "Wages Peace" Shortly after the lifting of the Berlin Blockade, in August 1949, the Soviet Union broke the American nuclear monopoly by developing its own atomic bomb. This development forced the United States to reevaluate its defense posture and accelerated the creation of even more powerful weapons, such as the hydrogen bomb, to regain its nuclear superiority. As president, Eisenhower struggled to balance defense and spending. President Dwight D. Eisenhower standing with Lyndon B. Johnson and others “Project Solarium” As Commander-in-Chief and as a former Army General, Eisenhower at least exerted greater control over the military. He called for a reconsideration of the country’s Cold War policies upon taking office and initiated “Project Solarium”—named for the room of the White House where the project was discussed—which requested three blue-ribbon, top secret panels to separately consider and propose a strategy for America’s Cold War policy. A 1960s view of the White House Solarium The Problem of Massive Retaliation Massive retaliation limited the Eisenhower administration’s policy options. The decision not to use nuclear weapons in Vietnam called into question the administration’s policy of massive retaliation and deterrence. Massive retaliation might have been a successful policy for keeping the Cold War in balance and an option for stopping a major Soviet advance into Western Europe–although it was never put to this test–but it did not answer everything. Series: World War II and the Gettysburg National Cemetery Originally conceived as a national cemetery for the Federal dead after the battle of Gettysburg, Gettysburg National Cemetery is the final resting place of over 500 American service personnel who gave the last full measure during World War II. A row of US government-issue headstones with American flags marking them. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Eisenhower and the Nuclear Arms Race in the 1950s "We will not be aggressors," said President Eisenhower, "but we ... have and will maintain a massive capability to strike back." Eisenhower's comments reflected the doctrinal basis behind much of America's strategic planning during the Cold War era. Learn more about how the Eisenhower administration moved beyond containment and addressed new Soviet threats. President Eisenhower with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev Series: Creative Teaching with Historic Places: Selections from CRM Vol 23 no 8 (2000) These articles are a selection from a special issue of CRM Journal, "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" published in 2000. They provide examples of teaching using historic places both in and out of the classroom, helping students connect with history using the power of place, as well as how to prepare lessons making those connections. Teaching with Historic Places is a program of the National Park Service. Cover of CRM Journal "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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