"Erie Canalway- Tug-Lock" by Duncan Hay , public domain

Erie Canalway

National Heritage Corridor - New York

The Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor includes 34 National historic landmarks and 234 local municipalities. Among the designated sites is the Morgan-Manning House, which houses the Western Monroe Historical Society and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991, the Flight of Five Locks in Lockport, and the Mabee Farm Historic Site, which marks an early frontier and gateway to the west.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Park Brochure of Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor (NHC). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Erie Canalway - Brochure

Park Brochure of Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor (NHC). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor guide to Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor (NHC). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Erie Canalway - Guide and Map 2020

Visitor guide to Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor (NHC). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Map of Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor (NHC). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Erie Canalway - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor (NHC). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Erie Canalway NHC https://www.nps.gov/erie/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erie_Canalway_National_Heritage_Corridor The Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor includes 34 National historic landmarks and 234 local municipalities. Among the designated sites is the Morgan-Manning House, which houses the Western Monroe Historical Society and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991, the Flight of Five Locks in Lockport, and the Mabee Farm Historic Site, which marks an early frontier and gateway to the west. Explore the Erie Canal and discover America's most famous and influential man-made waterway. Nowhere else will you find the distinctive locks and low bridges of the New York State Canal System or discover towns and cities whose watery front doors still give way to lively Main Streets. More than 500 miles of historic waterways and trails are here to explore. Begin your journey in the east, west, or right in the middle of New York State, you can't go wrong-- the canal's treasures are strong together along the waterway like gems on a necklace. The canal is accessible by CAR, RAIL, BIKE, and BOAT and from major airports: Albany International (ALB), Syracuse Hancock International (SYR), Greater Rochester International (ROC), and Buffalo-Niagara International (BUF). Oswego Paddlefest Dozens of kayakers paddle along the Erie Canal. Kayakers at the Oswego Paddlefest Festivals and Recreational Events Kick Off Bicentennial Celebrations and Opening of the New York State Canal System WATERFORD, NY- The Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor and the New York State Canal Corporation have teamed up to sponsor 27 festivals and events in 2017 to showcase the Canalway Corridor’s nationally significant heritage and the tremendous recreational appeal of the waterway and Canalway Trail today. Events include cycling and paddling tours, canal festivals, and concerts on the waterfront. Men and women sit amongst the trees and grass while watching a night concert. Erie Canalway NHC Hosts World Canals Conference From September 24 to 28, delegates from around the world convened in Syracuse, NY to discuss the many facets of canal development, and to learn firsthand about the engineering and economic marvel that is the Erie Canal. Erie Canalway NHC hosted the 2017 World Canals Conference Erie Canal Opens for a Season of Outdoor Fun The New York State Canals opened on May 17 and already the 2019 season is off to a roaring start. With the Canalway Challenge and a new set of paddler-friendly navigational tools, there’s something fun for all ages and abilities in the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor. Aerial shot of several dozen brightly colored kayaks on a canal Early New York State Waterways & the Inland Lock & Navigation Company The Erie Canal was simply the last “technological update” to an already existing water route linking eastern and western NY. A series of waterways (Hudson River, Mohawk River, Wood Creek, Oneida Lake, Oswego River) served to link Albany with the Great Lakes region prior to the coming of the Erie Canal. A black and white print of a river with two long boats. Each boat has several men paddling them. From Indifferent to Cosmopolitan: Transportation and Social Change in Seneca Falls To some, it may seem surprising that Seneca Falls, a relatively small community in western New York, served as the site of the First Women’s Rights Convention and the start of the formal women’s rights movement. People in the nineteenth century, however, would have recognized Seneca Falls and western New York as a hotbed of reform activity and a plausible location for the start of a major social movement, thanks to advancements in transportation that spurred community growth B&W etching of mill and waterfalls Series: The Oneida Carry The Oneida Carry was the English name for the portage path between the Mohawk River and Wood Creek. The carry was a part of the major water route between New York City and Canada. It was between one to six miles in length depending on the season of the year. Map with trails and rivers. Title:
Oh io River Other canals—in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia—that sought to breach the mountain barrier and capture Erie Canal trade lacked such topographical advantage. Most were not completed, and none proved a financial success. Opening America The Erie Canal was North America’s most successful and influential public works project. Built between 1817 and 1825, this 363-mile-long canal was the first all-water link between the Atlantic seaboard and Great Lakes. New York Govenor DeWitt Clinton relentlessly promoted its construction. Skeptics just as forcefully derided it as “Clinton’s Ditch,” but Clinton would be vindicated. The canal advanced Euro-American settlement of the Northeast, Midwest, and Great Plains, sometimes at the expense of Native populations. It fostered national unity and economic power. It made New York the Empire State and New York City the nation’s prime seaport and seat of world trade. Faster, Cheaper Canal packet boat passengers traveled in relative comfort from Albany to Buffalo in five days—not two weeks in crowded stagecoaches. Freight rates fell 90 percent compared to shipping by ox-drawn wagon. Freight boats carried Midwestern produce from Buffalo to Albany. Most continued on to New York City’s seaport, towed down the Hudson in fleets behind steam tugboats. Midwestern farmers, loggers, miners, and manufacturers found new access to lucrative far-flung markets. Continuing the Connection Success quickly spurred expansion and enlargement of New York’s canal system to handle more and bigger boats. It triggered canal mania—a rash of canal building across the eastern United States and Canada in the mid-1800s, before railroads became the principal means of hauling freight and passengers. From 1905 to 1918 New York State built the Barge Canal system, a robust grandchild of the Erie, Champlain, Oswego, and Cayuga-Seneca canals. A Flow of People and Ideas The Erie Canal and a system of connecting waterways fulfilled DeWitt Clinton’s prophecy that New York would be America’s preeminent state, populated from border to border and generating wealth for itself and the nation. Soon New York City was the nation’s busiest port, most populous city, and foremost seat of commerce and finance. Immigrants knew they could find work there or in many new cities sprouting along the canal. As it opened the American interior to settlement, the canal brought a flow of people and new ideas. Social reform movements like abolitionism and women’s suffrage, utopian communities, and various religious movements thrived in the canal corridor. The Erie Canal carried more westbound immigrants than any other trans-Appalachian canal. These newcomers infused the nation with different languages, customs, practices, and religions. Although commercial traffic declined after the St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959, New York’s Canal System is still in service. New York canals, both active and retired, are now vibrant places to enjoy both water- and landbased recreation and to learn about and celebrate our nation’s heritage. Whitehall Black River Canal L A K E O N TA R I O Path of Least Resistance Canal engineers chose the path of least resistance across New York State’s complex topography, but the route was not always easy. The map at right shows mid 19th-century New York at the peak of its canal era when a system of artificial waterways reached throughout the state. Several canals were abandoned in the face of competition from railroads, but the Erie, Champlain, Oswego, and CayugaSeneca canals are still operating today. A R A A G N I Niagara Falls Lockport E S C A R P M E N T Oswego Canal Rochester Erie Buffalo LAKE ERIE Syracuse CayugaSeneca Canal Genesee Valley Canal F I N G E R Crooked Lake Canal Keyuka Lake Seneca Lake Utica C an a l CANADA A D I R O N D A C K M O U N TA I N S Rome Oneida Lake Lyons Champlain Canal Little Falls Mohawk L A K E S Cayuga Lake er Cohoes Falls NEW YORK Albany Chenango Canal C AT S K I L L Chemung Canal Profile in Locks and Levels Canal Topography Profile The heavy brown line atop the historic map at right shows the changes in elevation overcome by the Erie Canal’s locks between Albany and Buffalo. Erie Canal Profile Erie Canal Sixteen locks were required to climb out of the deep Hudson Valley past Cohoes Falls near the mouth of the Mohawk River. The canal climbed steadily along the Mohawk from Schenectady to another steep rise at Little Falls. From there the long level—a 58-mile stretch of flat water requiring no lock—carried boats over a drainage divide at Rome and on to relatively flat terrain south of Oneida Lake and north of the Finger Lakes. Erie Canalway Riv Schenectady M O U N TA I N S Canals conquer space with successions of lift locks and levels. Lake Erie is 570 feet higher than the Hudson River at Albany. On the original Erie Canal, 83 stone-walled locks lifted and lowered boats in an irregular staircase. The final barrier
Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Erie Canalway Map & Guide Pittsford, Frank Forte The New York State Canal System—which includes the Erie, Champlain, Cayuga-Seneca, and Oswego Canals—is the centerpiece of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor. Experience the enduring legacy of this National Historic Landmark by boat, bike, car, or on foot. Discover New York’s Extraordinary Canals Dubbed the “Mother of Cities” the canal fueled the growth of industries, opened the nation to settlement, and made New York the Empire State. (Clinton Square, Syracuse, 1905, courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection.) O pened in 1825, New York’s canals are a waterway link from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes through the heart of upstate New York. Through wars and peacetime, prosperity and recession, flood and drought, this exceptional waterway has provided a living connection to a proud past and a vibrant future. Built with leadership, ingenuity, determination, and hard work, the canals continue to remind us of the qualities that make our state and nation great. They offer us inspiration to weather storms and time-tested knowledge that we will prevail. Come to New York’s canals this year. Touch the building stones Canals and COVID-19 Please refer to current guidelines and recommendations from the State of New York and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to safely enjoy all the Canalway Corridor has to offer. Before you travel, check to see whether visitor centers, sites of interest, tours, and services are open. Though they may not be going about “business as usual,” many businesses, restaurants, and sites are doing their best to carry on with creative new approaches. Please show your support and patronage when possible. laid by immigrants and farmers 200 years ago. See century-old locks, lift bridges, and movable dams constructed during the canal’s 20th century enlargement and still in use today. Walk, run, or cycle on the path where mules once trod. Imagine the strength and stamina of people who traversed the towpath long ago for work and the promise of America. There are many ways to enjoy the waterway. More than 500 miles of canals and connected lakes and rivers, 365 miles of Canalway Trail, and hundreds of canalside communities are here to explore. Boating, paddling and cycling present outstanding ways to experience the canals up close. Choose from hundreds of museums, historic sites, state parks, and attractions along the way. And be sure to sample local flavor at craft breweries, wineries, farmers markets, and eateries. You’ll quickly discover that they are within easy reach of most canal waterfronts. This guide presents exciting things to do, places to go, and exceptional activities to enjoy. Welcome! CONTENTS Enjoy Boats and Boating on the Canals . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Erie Canalway Map. . . . . . . . . . 4 Hit the Trail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Canalway Challenge . . . . . . . . . 7 Votes for Women. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Erie Canalway Map & Guide 2020 The Fastest Way to Slow Down Lock 13, Mohawk Valley Welcome Center, Frank Forte Lock E2, Waterford, Call of the Loon Enjoy Boats and Boating on the Canals ca. 1921, courtesy hives New York State Arc A NATIONAL TREASURE—Built between 1817 and 1825, the original Erie Canal traversed 363 miles from Albany to Buffalo. It was the longest artificial waterway and the greatest public works project in North America. The canal put New York on the map as the Empire State—the leader in population, industry, and economic strength. It transformed New York City into the nation’s principal seaport and opened the interior of North America to settlement. The canal was enlarged several times to accommodate larger boats and increasing traffic. The version we use today was completed in 1918 and remains fully navigable. In 2016 it was designated a National Historic Landmark for its exceptional national significance and historical integrity. 2 Erie Canalway Map & Guide • Be cautious near hydroelectric plants where currents and water levels can change quickly • Leave no trace: carry out what you carry in The New York State Canalway Water Trail Guidebook and Map Set are indispensable resources for paddlers. Request a copy of the mile-bymile guide at paddler@eriecanalway.org or visit eriecanalway.org/watertrail. Boat Tours and Vacation Rentals brookfieldrenewable.com You can get on the water for a scenic ride or enjoy a lunch or dinner cruise on one of the many tour boats along the canals. Specialty cruises, sailing adventures, and wine tours are offered on lake and river sections of the waterway. Multi-day cruises are available if you are looking for a longer trip. Vacation rentals provide an idyllic way to experience the canal at a relaxed pace. You’ll get le

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