"Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Eugene O'Neill

National Historic Site - California

The Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, located in Danville, California, preserves Tao House, the Monterey Colonial hillside home of America's only Nobel Prize-winning playwright, Eugene O'Neill.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.East Bay Regional Parks - Overview Map

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/euon/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugene_O%27Neill_National_Historic_Site The Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, located in Danville, California, preserves Tao House, the Monterey Colonial hillside home of America's only Nobel Prize-winning playwright, Eugene O'Neill. America's only Nobel Prize winning playwright, Eugene O'Neill, chose to live in Northern California at the height of his writing career. Isolated from the world and within the walls of his home, O'Neill wrote his final and most memorable plays; The Iceman Cometh, Long Day's Journey Into Night, and A Moon for the Misbegotten. Reservations are required to visit the site. We offer a free shuttle that will pick up visitors in downtown Danville, CA. The shuttle meets at 205 Railroad Avenue outside the Museum of the San Ramon Valley. Parking is available next to the museum. Reservations can be made by calling (925)228-8860 x6422 or send your reservation request by e-mail. Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site The visitor center is part of the Eugene O'Neill NHS. Due to the location and nature of the park, the visitor center is accessible as part of a reservations only tour. There is a small bookstore on site. Due to the nature of Eugene O'Neill NHS, visitors are not able to drive directly to the park site. Instead, reservations are required and we offer a free shuttle that will pick up the visitor in downtown Danville, CA. The shuttle meets at 205 Railroad Avenue in downtown Danville, just outside the Museum of the San Ramon Valley. Parking is available next to the museum. More information will be given once you call and make a reservation with the park staff. Eugene O'Neill Home in Danville, California Eugene O'Neill Home in Danville, California Eugene O'Neill Home in Danville, California Old Barn An old barn and an historic wheeled wagon sit in front of a tree-lined hill. The "Old Barn", a part of the Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site A tree is seen sitting against a small mountain background. A fence runs along the right side. Mountain background as seen from the park. Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site A sign with the park name is sitting in a field of trees. The Eugene O'Neill NHS park sign. Eugene O'Neill Eugene O'Neill, and older man, poses outside against a hilly background. Historic image of Eugene O'Neill at the Tao House property. Bat Inventory of Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, John Muir National Historic Site and Point Reyes National Seashore Bats are economically and ecologically important animals, providing ecosystem services such as pollination and predation of insects. In general, bat populations are believed to be declining. Researchers used acoustic sampling to inventory bat populations at Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, John Muir National Historic Site, and Point Reyes National Seashore. All of these parks are on the wildland-urban interface. Photo of a hoary bat. Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site Cultural Landscape Eugene O’Neill National Historic Site consists of 13.19-acres of land and is situated within Las Trampas Hills at 700 feet above sea level on the western edge of the city of Danville, California. Within the historic site, buildings, roads, several small orchards, and ornamental vegetation were developed between the years 1880 and 1944, and characterize the property as a small working ranch. A garden hedge and tree in front of a house. Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Top Ten Tips for A Summer Visit to Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site Eugene O'Neill and his dog Blemie are enjoying a summer morning. An older man and his dog are laying in the grass.

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