"Homestead Canal" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Everglades

National Park - Florida

Everglades National Park is a U.S. National Park in Florida that protects the southern 20 percent of the original Everglades.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Everglades National Park (NP) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Everglades - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Everglades National Park (NP) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/ever/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everglades_National_Park Everglades National Park is a U.S. National Park in Florida that protects the southern 20 percent of the original Everglades. Everglades National Park protects an unparalleled landscape that provides important habitat for numerous rare and endangered species like the manatee, American crocodile, and the elusive Florida panther. An international treasure as well - a World Heritage Site, International Biosphere Reserve, a Wetland of International Importance, and a specially protected area under the Cartagena Treaty. Directions to Ernest Coe Visitor Center 40001 State Road 9336, Homestead, FL 33034 Visitors coming from the Miami area and points north should take the Florida Turnpike (Route 821) south until it ends merging with U.S. 1 at Florida City. Turn right at the first traffic light onto Palm Drive (State Road 9336/SW 344th St.) and follow the signs to the park. Visitors driving north from the Florida Keys should turn left on Palm Drive in Florida City and follow the signs to the park. Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center The Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center is the visitor center closest to Homestead for Everglades National Park. It is open 365 days a year and offers educational displays, orientation films, and informational brochures. Park Rangers are available to help plan your trip. There is a giftshop that sells souvenirs and snacks. In the summer time it is open 9AM - 5PM and in the winter it is open 8AM - 5PM. Visitors coming from the Miami area and points north should take the Florida Turnpike (Route 821) south until it ends merging with U.S. 1 at Florida City. Turn right at the first traffic light onto Palm Drive (State Road 9336/SW 344th St.) and follow the signs to the park. Visitors driving north from the Florida Keys should turn left on Palm Drive in Florida City and follow the signs to the park. Approximate GPS coordinates: 25°23'42.97" N 80°34"59.36" W Flamingo Visitor Center The Flamingo Visitor Center is open year round and features educational displays, informational brochures, a bookstore and more. Campground facilities, a public boat ramp, marina store, a fish cleaning station, and hiking and canoeing trails are located near the visitor center. Plan ahead for food and other needs, as there are minimal services currently available. Visitors coming from the Miami area and points north should take the Florida Turnpike (Route 821) south until it ends, merging with U.S. 1 at Florida City. Turn right at the first traffic light onto Palm Dr. (SR 9336/SW 344th St.) and follow the signs to the park. From the Florida Keys, drive north and turn left on Palm Drive in Florida City and follow the signs to the park. The visitor center lies roughly 38 miles south of the park main entrance. GPS Coordinates: 25°08'28.96" N 80°55'25.73" W Gulf Coast Visitor Center The Gulf Coast Visitor Center serves as the gateway for exploring the Ten Thousand Islands, a maze of mangrove islands and waterways that extends to Flamingo and Florida Bay accessible only by boat in this region. The visitor center offers educational displays, informational brochures and wilderness permits. It is open every day of the year from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The Gulf Coast Visitor Center is located 5 miles south of Highway 41 (Tamiami Trail) on State Road 29, in Everglades City. From Interstate 75 (Alligator Alley), take exit 80 (State Road 29) south and proceed 20 miles to Everglades City. Once in Everglades City, follow the signs to the park. The visitor center is on the right. Approximate GPS coordinates: 25°50'49.03" N 81°23'06.85" W Shark Valley Visitor Center Shark Valley Visitor Center provides the gateway to a panoramic 15-mile loop trail and observation tower. Open year-round, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. the visitor center also hosts exhibits, park film, and association bookstore, alongside the Shark Valley Tram Tour concessionaire. The GPS address for the visitor center is; 36000 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33194. From Miami, Shark Valley Visitor Center is located on Highway 41 (Tamiami Trail / SW 8th St.) 25 miles west of the Florida Turnpike, exit 25A (from the north) and exit 25 (from the south). From the Naples area, take U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) approximately 70 miles east to Shark Valley. Approximate GPS Coordinates: 25°45'27.60" N 80°46'01.01" W Flamingo Campground The Flamingo campground is one of two drive-in campgrounds accessible from the Homestead entrance of the park. It offers solar-heated showers, two dump stations, picnic tables, grills, and an amphitheater for seasonal Ranger programs. Flamingo has several hiking trails and canoe trails, and opportunities for saltwater fishing are plentiful. Check at the visitor center for a daily schedule of Ranger guided programs. Flamingo Campground- RV with electric hook-up (per site per night) General (Monday - Thursday) 45.00 The fee covers electric hook-up per site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- RV with electric hook-up (per site per night) Senior, Military, Access (Monday - Thursday) 40.50 The fee covers electric hook-up per site per night.This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- RV with electric hookup (per site per night) General (Friday - Sunday) 55.00 The fee covers electric hook-up per site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- RV with electric hookup (per site per night) Senior, Military, Access (Friday - Sunday) 49.50 The fee covers electric hook-up per site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) General (Monday - Thursday) 30.00 The fees cover a non-electric hook-up site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) Senior, Military, Access (Monday - Thursday) 27.00 The fee covers a non-electric hook-up site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) General (Friday - Sunday) 35.00 The fees cover a non-electric hook-up site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- tend and non-electric RV (per site per night) Senior, Military, Access (Friday - Sunday) 31.50 The fees cover a non-electric hook-up site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Flamingo Campground- group site (per night per site) 55.00 The fee covers up to 15 people, 5 tents and 3 vehicles per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Tent at Flamingo Campground A blue, gray and yellow tent is pitched on the grass. Palm tree and open field are behind it. Tent camping at Flamingo Flamingo Campground An open field with tents set up and picnic tables. Four palm trees stand tall in the background. Flamingo campground on the shores of Florida Bay Flamingo Campground Kiosk A white entrance building stands alongside a road with green grass and trees in the distance Entrance kiosk at Flamingo campground A Loop Flamingo Campground A parked vehicle with camp supplies and tent in a camp site underneath a tree Camping at A Loop in Flamingo Campground RV's Lined Up at Flamingo Campground Kiosk Two white recreational vehicles are in line to register for a campsite. Trees in the background. Flamingo is a very popular campground Long Pine Key Campground Long Pine Key campground is open seasonally November-May. It is one of two frontcountry camping options run by the “Flamingo Adventures'' concession. Reservations are available for RV’s and tents along with first come first serve sites. If sites are booked, more camping may be available further down the Main Park Road in Flamingo. Long Pine Key Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) General (Monday - Thursday) 30.00 The fee covers one site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Long Pine Key Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) Senior, Military, Access (Monday - Thursday) 27.00 The fee covers one site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Long Pine Key Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) General (Friday - Sunday) 35.00 The fee covers one site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Long Pine Key Campground- tent and non-electric RV (per site per night) Senior, Military, Access (Friday - Sunday) 31.50 The fee covers one site per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. Long Pine Key Campground- group site (per night per site) 55.00 The fee covers up to 15 people, 5 tents and 3 vehicles per night. This camping fee does not include the entrance fee to the Park. RV's at Long Pine Key Two RV trailers parked at a campground surrounded by tall slash pine trees. RV camping at Long Pine Key campground Camping at Long Pine Key Two visitors are setting up a tent on a campsite at Long Pine Key Camping at Long Pine Key Long Pine Key Camp Entrance A white fees building with green roof welcomes campers The Long Pine Key Entrance Station is open seasonally Amphitheatre at Long Piney Key Campground People sit on wooden benches listening to a Park Ranger deliver a program. It is night time. Visitors attend an evening Ranger program Picnic at Long Pine Key A group of three people sit at a picnic table by a pond surrounded by pine trees. Picnicking at the Long Pine Key day-use area Cypress Tree Sunrise A sunset creates a silhouette of a cypress tree with needle-like leaves that is shaped like an 'N'. Cypress Tree Sunrise (2020 Photo Contest) Nine Mile Pond Two canoes at Nine Mile Pond during sunset. A meeting ground of marsh and mangrove environments. You may see alligators, wading birds, turtles, and fish. American Alligator An American Alligator high walks the Anhinga Trail. An American Alligator high walks the Anhinga Trail. Shark Valley Tram and Bicycle Road Two visitors bike along the road in Shark Valley. Biking is a great way to experience the quiet beauty of the Everglades. Transition from Sawgrass to Florida Bay An aerial view of the landscape transition from Sawgrass to Florida Bay. An aerial view of the landscape transition from Sawgrass to Florida Bay. Camping at Long Pine Key Three tents are put up along the Long Pine Key campsite. Long Pine Key Campground is open seasonally from November through May. It is located seven miles (11 km) from the main entrance, just off the main road. Yvette Cano: Director of Education at Everglades National Park Ranger Yvette Cano, the Director of Education at Everglades National Park, shares her journey to the National Park Service, how her cultural background has influenced her work, and what she finds most rewarding about her job. Ranger Yvette Cano Partnerships add a Charge to your Travel Plans The National Park Service, the National Park Foundation, BMW of North America, the U.S. Department of Energy, concessioners, and gateway communities have collaborated to provide new technologies for travel options to and around national parks. As part of this public-private partnership, BMW of North America, working through the National Park Foundation, donated and arranged for the installation of 100 electric vehicle (EV) charging ports in and around national parks. Keynote: Using Science in Decision Making National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis delivered the opening keynote at the 11th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem on October 9, 2012. The article that follows is based on an edited transcription of his remarks at the conference. Science Plan in Support of Ecosystem Restoration, Preservation, and Protection in South Florida The Florida Everglades is a complex ecosystem of diverse, interconnected subtropical habitats. Once comprised of over 4 million acres, today the historic Everglades have been reduced by half. The conflict of human versus natural elements in South Florida began in earnest in the early 1900s, when the control of water and the drainage of wetlands were first considered essential for commerce and human safety. A swamp with varying vegetation Wildland Fire: Everglades Partners with USFWS and SCA Everglades National Park fire staff partnered with the USFWS and Student Conservation Association to evaluate new methods for locating pineland croton in pine rocklands habitat. This is the host plant for two federally endangered butterflies. New techniques for locating and monitoring pineland croton will help fire managers plan prescribed fire operations to maintain and restore resilient landscapes for endangered wildlife. Aviation Supports Environmental Protection Agency Research in South Florida The National Park Service continues to extend its aviation support beyond the traditional fire realm. Everglades and Big Cypress National Parks’ Aviation programs are working together with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to support a complex aviation-dependent research project called the Everglades Ecosystem Assessment Program (EEAP). Two helicopters at Everglades National Park 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor 2016 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Learn the invaluable contributions of the 2016 Hartzog winners, celebrating excellence in volunteerism. Group of school kids pointing at things in a marsh area America's Best Idea: Featured National Historic Landmarks Over 200 National Historic Landmarks are located in national parks units. Some historical and cultural resources within the park system were designated as NHLs before being established as park units. Yet other park units have NHLs within their boundaries that are nationally significant for reasons other than those for which the park was established. Twenty of those NHLs are located in parks featured in Ken Burn's documentary, The National Parks: America's Best Idea. watchtower against blue sky Students Contemplate Future Fire and Aviation Careers in the National Park Service Waterstone Charter School students tour the NPS helicopter with aviation operations specialist Gary Carnall. students sit in the pilots seat of a helicopter Southeast National Parks Train 165 New Wildland Firefighters Between December 2011 and March 2012, Southeast Region national parks trained 165 new wildland firefighters in S-130/190 courses at four separate units, including Mammoth Cave National Park, Kings Mountain National Military Park, Cumberland Island National Seashore, and Everglades National Park. Trainees came from federal and state agencies, local fire departments, universities, and other partners. The First Recorded Python in Everglades National Park, 40 Years Later Everglades National Park just had a 40th anniversary on October 24. It’s one anniversary we’d rather not celebrate. That’s the day in 1979 when the first recorded python was caught in the park near Everglades Safari Park on Tamiami Trail. Burmese pythons The Race to Keep Invasive Tegus Out of Everglades National Park Tracking tegus is critical work. Scientists at the National Park Service, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the University of Florida, and the U.S. Geological Survey are monitoring the tegus in South Florida because of the potential impact they can have on the environment. Tegu in Everglades National Park PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Odum's 1960s Everglades Studies Shape The Science of Ecology Dead plant matter (the stuff you might feel inclined to rake up and get rid of) is an incredible energy source and the engine behind the region’s productivity. Tangled mangrove roots with brown and orange wet leaves Sea-level rise and inundation scenarios for national parks in South Florida A review of the science leads researchers to project sea level rise and inundation, trends in the frequency of nuisance flooding, recurrence intervals of storm surge, and impacts on infrastructure intended to provide useful information for managers and planners. Median RCP8.5 mean sea-level elevation projections for Everglades and Biscayne; NPS/Everglades NP Spiny Lobster Reserves Spiny lobsters (Panulirus argus) are keystone predators that, by preying on other carnivorous invertebrates in the reef ecosystem, control populations and mediate competition among prey species. The removal of this species thus reduces the biodiversity and resilience of the entire system. Spiny lobster observed from above ocean floor. Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Science at Sea in the Gulf of Mexico Science at Sea - Follow along as a research cruise makes its way around the Gulf of Mexico and collects water samples from 4 national parks. ocean view of Florida Bay Wildland Fire History — Interpreting Fire in Everglades National Park In this article from 1989, Everglades NP interpreters discuss the various fire regimes present in the park and the various methods of interpreting fire for visitors. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Everglades National Park, Florida Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] wetlands landscape Looking for Invasive Species in South Florida Invasive species are bad news. They are able to spread aggressively outside their natural range, and can cause local extinctions of native species. Invasives are plentiful in South Florida because the subtropical environment allows for many non-native species to thrive, and Miami acts as a port of entry. Local ornamental and pet industries breed animals and plants here that have the potential to escape and survive. Staff looking for exotic fish in throwtrap Satellite communications: Geocaches as interpretation A pilot project in Everglades National Park examines visitor use of a park sponsored geocaching program and demonstrates interpretive benefits. Weatherproof plastic box that serves as geocache (credit: NPS Photo) Park Air Profiles - Everglades National Park Air quality profile for Everglades National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Everglades NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Everglades NP. Photographer on the water in Everglades NP 2017 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the national and regional winners of the 2017 Freeman Tilden Award; the National Park Service's highest award for excellence in interpretation. Portrait of Hollie Lynch 2015 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the recipients of the 2015 Freeman Tilden Awards, the highest National Park Service honor for interpretation, and learn more about their exciting programs. Ernie Price Everglades Firefighters Use Prescribed Fire around Ernest Coe Visitor Center as Educational Opportunity In January 2012, winter visitors to Everglades NP got an up-close view of fire during the Headquarters prescribed fire treatment. Objectives of the 6.5-acre fire were to reduce hazardous fuel accumulations near park administrative offices and the visitor center, maintain scenic viewsheds, and provide staff and visitors educational opportunities to learn about the Everglades fire-adapted ecosystem. A firefighter talks to visitors along a boardwalk while fire burns on the other side of a fence. When Plants Go Rogue: Aggressive Exotic Plants Endanger the Everglades South Florida is a plant paradise, and many non-native plants are able to thrive here. These exotic plants outcompete native plants, and some, like Melaleuca, threaten our water supply by disrupting historical water flow. Then, why do pythons get so much media attention when invasive plants are as great of a threat, if not more, to the Everglades and our own livelihood? Brazilian Pepper Everglades Fire Staff Collaborates with Florida International University in Research on Exotic Plant Response to Fire Everglades NP fire and exotic plant management personnel worked with Florida International Univ. biologists to conduct an experiment on Lygodium microphyllum, an exotic, invasive plant. Lygodium can cause landscape-level ecological changes in the park and may outcompete native plants. To learn to better manage Lygodium, fire staff provided support while burning “test” plants during a recent study aimed at finding out more about Lygodium growth and reproduction after fire. Everglades Firefighters Assist Florida Forest Service and Miami-Dade Natural Areas Management in Prescribed Fires Everglades National Park firefighters worked collaboratively with the Florida Forest Service and Miami-Dade County Natural Areas Management Division to conduct four prescribed fires in October and November 2014. The coordinated efforts allowed managers to help maintain pine rockland habitat, open forest canopy, and establish fire-adapted communities. Vegetation burning at Everglades National Park Everglades Firefighters Assist Key Deer National Wildlife Refuge in Prescribed Fires In August 2014, Everglades National Park firefighters assisted the US Fish and Wildlife Service and other fire staff in conducting three prescribed fires at Key Deer National Wildlife Refuge. Using combined fire staff allowed refuge managers to complete prescribed fires that were instrumental in maintaining rare pine rockland habitat and maintaining and restoring resilient landscapes to make future wildfires in the area more manageable. Everglades Firefighter Conducts Video Chat with Students In August 2014, Everglades firefighting and environmental education staff conducted a video chat with students participating in the Fort Scott (Kansas) National Historic Site’s Trailblazer Program, in which students learn about cultural and natural resource protection, interpretation, and fire management in the National Park Service. Wildland Fire: Walking in Footsteps of Bill Robertson Everglades fire staff are walking in the footsteps of Bill Robertson, the park’s first fire control aid starting in the late 1950s, trying to relocate his research plots, which are part of a larger project to see how the condition of the pine rocklands has changed. Revisiting Robertson’s plots will allow additional research information to be gathered and compiled with existing data, helping fire managers to maintain and restore resilient landscapes. A man in fire-resistant gear and hardhat looks at a compass National Parks in the History of Science: Island Biogeography (Video) Fifty years ago, mangrove islands in Everglades National Park were the subject of a now-famous experiment that tested an important idea about biodiversity. Meet the scientist who conducted it. historical photo of men on scaffolding Wildland Fire and Aviation Excellence Award Presented to James Sullivan James Sullivan, South Florida Parks and Preserve Chief of Wildland Fire and Aviation, receives the 2019 NPS Interior Region 2 Wildland Fire and Aviation Excellence Award. Department of the Interior Secretary, David Bernhardt presented the award alongside Pedro Ramon, the Superintendent of Everglades National Park. The award recognizes outstanding achievements in leadership development, operational leadership, and cooperation and collaboration. Three men stand on asphalt in front of wooded area. The man in the center is holding an award. POET Newsletter September 2012 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from September 2012. Articles include: Sea Level Rise and Coastal Parks; Fun with Coral Reefs and Climate Change Education; and Climate Change Exhibits From Sea to Rising Sea. people on beach NPS Aviation Programs Support Environmental Protection Agency Research Everglades and Big Cypress National Parks’ aviation programs are working together with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to support a complex aviation-dependent research project called the Everglades Ecosystem Assessment Program (EEAP). An A-Star helicopter and a Bell 206 helicopter. Cold War in the Everglades Everglades National Park is usually recognized for its natural resources, but not as many people know about park's association with the Cold War and Cuban Missile Crisis. In 1962, the detection of weapons in Cuba led to the movement of military personnel to south Florida in order to prepare for a possible invasion. Florida's HM69 Nike Missile Base consisted of the Control Area and the Launch Area. Many reminders of this history in the Everglades, often overlooked, remain. A rounded, airy tree leans over a one-story, rectangular building on a flat landscape. Ecology II: Throat Song from the Everglades (a book of poems) Read three of Anne McCrary Sullivan's poems from "Ecology II: Throat Song from the Everglades," a book of poems inspired by her residency at Everglades National Park. body of water surrounded by trees Tamiami Trail: Next Steps Mega-project to restore the natural flow of water into the Everglades. Tamiami Bridge under construction So What’s in a Burmese Python Anyway? Dr. Christina Romagosa is a research associate professor in the University of Florida’s Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation in Gainesville, Florida, but much of her work is in South Florida. Her research focuses on how ecosystems respond to invasive species, or non-native species that do harm to the ecosystem. Burmese python Prey Items Everglades Triptych Read Karla Linn Merrifield's three poems created after a 2009 residency at Everglades National Park. black and white photo of a field under a sky of puffy clouds Poems from the Everglades A 2007 residency at Everglades led to these three poems from Diana Woodcock. a boardwalk over a swamp New water plan for South Florida is good news for Everglades National Park Everglades National Park is about to get more, clean fresh water, particularly in the dry season. In fact, the distribution of fresh water all across southern Florida is about to change for the better with a new plan born from the collaboration of government agencies, including the National Park Service, tribal nations and stakeholder groups. Everglades Ridge and Slough Wildland Fire: Everglades NP Collaborates with Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve Everglades National Park fire and resource management staff attended the 2nd International Congress for Coastal Protected Areas with Tree Island Ecosystems in Campeche, Mexico, in September 2014. The conference, held at Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, focused on fire-prone, wetland ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. This international collaboration reflects NPS interest in maintaining and restoring resilient landscapes. Using Their Voices: Founding Women of National Parks As we commemorate both the centennial of the 19th Amendment and the 104th birthday of the National Park Service, we’re highlighting a few women who harnessed their public voices to protect powerfully important American places. The Frontline Over the course of the last few months we have watched our way of life change dramatically as COVID-19 has forced people to learn to live much more cautiously. And yet, with all that is happening, some things continue on as they always have. Firefighters suppressing wildfire at night Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Invasive Species in South Florida Ever wonder when Burmese pythons came to the Everglades, or how they got here? Did you know that bugs can help slow the spread of exotic plants? Do you know what to do if you see an invasive species in Florida? Read here to find out the answers to these questions, and more Burmese Python Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Series: Water Levels at the end of 2020 and their effects on resources at Everglades National Park The last four months of 2020 brought over 23 inches of rain to the Everglades and water levels rose to be among the highest on record as a result. Although some access roads in the park and Shark Valley had to be temporarily closed, the high water levels were viewed as an overall benefit to the park's perpetually parched resources. This series explores more deeply where the water came from as well as where it went and the effects it had once it got there. A gator's eyes are seen poking up out of the water next to grassy vegetation Everglades National Park Uses Out of the Box Approach on Prescribed Fire for Restoration In January 2020, firefighters completed a prescribed fire on the HID-Buffer (Hole-In-The-Donut) Prescribed Fire unit in Everglades National Park. The 9,739-acre unit was a small piece of a much larger landscape level approach that Everglades Fire Management is taking with regards to South Florida Fuels Management. Firefighters hold driptorches in large open grassy area on fire looking at helicopter in the air. Unusual Partnerships on the Southern United States Border In FY20, partnerships around Everglades National Park contributed to reducing hazardous fuel loads, reduced exotic species spread, improved understanding role fire plays within the ecosystem, and created a more efficient and effective fire management strategy. Aerial view of fingers of fire creeping across the landscape while smoke billows away. Historic Water Levels in the Everglades Help Fix Salinity in Florida Bay The salinity of Florida Bay was affected by above average rainfall and historic water levels in the Everglades at the end of 2020. The status of Florida Bay in the winter of 2020-2021 offers a glimpse of how Florida Bay may look after Everglades Restoration. The seagrass-covered bottom of Florida Bay can be seen through clear, turquoise waters. Data Manager Profile: Judd Patterson Meet Judd Patterson, Data Manager for the South Florida Caribbean Network. As a data manager, helps wrangle all the information that we collect on the health of our park resources. Judd is excited about the stories data can tell through time, whether that's looking back at park records from over a hundred years ago, or making sure the science we do in our parks today become time capsules for future generations to learn about how things were back in 2021. Data manager Judd Patterson smiles at the camera while holding camera equiment. Exposed In The Everglades: The Bryde's Whale That Wasn't In January 2019, a whale stranded in Everglades National Park. Scientists used the samples and data they collected from the stranded whale and later its remains, to determine the stranded whale and those like it belong to a new species of critically endangered whales called the Rice's whale. Visitors that happened to be present for the stranding event witnessed scientific history. A crowd of people watch as scientists study a dead Rice's whale. Protesting to Keep Farming in the Hole-in-the-Donut everglades The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope Connecting Fire, Connecting Conservation Fire burns across south Florida in a landscape level prescribed fire operation. Fire burns and smoke billows across south Florida landscape Plan Your Everglades Vacation Like a Park Ranger Plan like a Park Ranger with these top 10 tips for visiting Everglades National Park A small tree surrounded by grasses and water with a sunset in the background Cherry Payne: A Career of Commitment and Compromise When Cherry Payne was first interviewed by Dorothy Boyle Huyck in the 1970s, she was a young interpretive ranger at Grand Teton National Park at the start of her NPS career. In an oral history interview recorded in 2020, she reflected on where that career had taken her. Each step of the way, Payne balanced commitment with compromise as she made decisions about family life, professional life, and park management. Portrait of Cherry Payne in a house Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline. Demonstrated Successes in 2021 for South Florida’s Exclusive Use Contract Helicopter In February 2021, South Florida Fire and Aviation transitioned to an Exclusive Use (EU) Contract helicopter while continuing to operate a DOI fleet aircraft as well. Acquisition of this EU helicopter brought substantial improvement through its ability to perform fire suppression and prescribed fire missions. Aerial view of helicopter flying above burning south Florida landscape. Southern Border Initiative – Hazardous Fuels Reduction and Law Enforcement Success in South Florida Parks and Preserve Between 2019 and 2021, South Florida Fire and Aviation Management used funds from the Southern Border Initiative to implement 224,792 acres of prescribed fire treatments throughout the area along the coasts of Everglades and Biscayne national parks. This helped to manage ecosystems and vegetation, to increase ecosystem resilience and health and safety and visibility for detecting illegal activity and to facilitate national security operations. A firefighter looks out a helicopter window at a south Florida wildland fire. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Girl (Guide) Power Just as the contributions of many women have been overlooked in NPS history, so too have the contributions of girls who held officially sanctioned guide positions. Two girl ranger aides speak with a man across a counter. Changing Attitudes Most women with disabilities hired by the National Park Service (NPS) in the 1970s and early 1980s had temporary jobs. Some built long-term careers with the bureau. Starting before the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, these women experienced the opportunities and changes the law brought. It was their hard work and dedication to the NPS mission, however, that continued to change attitudes and educate coworkers and visitors alike. Ranger Shirley Beccue in her wheelchair and NPS uniform and flat hat looks out over the Everglades. Art in the South Florida Parks Learn about the significance of art in the National Park system and see three selections from the South Florida National Parks. A three-panel woodcut print showing the diversity of the Big Cypress swamp by artist Molly Doctrow. Ranger Roll Call, 1950-1959 In the 1950s, women in uniform continue to work as guides, historians, and archeologists. Few women had permanent positions. A handful of women began to get seasonal ranger-naturalists positions at large national parks for the first time in two decades. Ann Livesay in her NPS uniform standing in front of a low wall at the edge of the Grand Canyon. National Park Service supports groundbreaking Indigenous fisheries management study Joining an international research team for a study published in journal Nature Communications, National Park Service (NPS) archeologists provided valuable research for a new global study finding that Indigenous groups sustainably harvested massive amounts of oysters over hundreds and sometimes thousands of years with minimal impact before European colonizers arrived. Two people mapping an oyster mound. Harney Re-Examined Part II: Harney's Treatment of Native Americans In the second part of "Harney Re-Examined" we explore General William Harney's treatment of Native Americans early in his career. Black and white lithograph of mounted horseman attacking native americans in a narrow hollow Harney Re-Examined Part IV: Harney and the Hanging of the San Patricio Brigade This article examines Harney's role in the Mexican-American War and his mass execution of the San Patricio Brigade watercolor painting of 20 men being hanged on a mass scaffold in front of a fortress Harney Re-Examined Part III: Harney and the Pig War This article re-examines William Harney's treatment of Native Americans and involvement in The Pig War Harney Re-Examined: The Early Years of General William Harney This article re-examines the early life and career of General William Harney From trickle to torrent: What’s up with water levels at Everglades National Park If you live in South Florida, you are probably aware that we had a very wet fall. For Everglades National Park, rainfall and restoration-related water management changes caused the trickle of water it had been receiving prior to September to quickly become a torrent. As a result, water levels in the park rose to be among some of the highest on record. An aerial view of a flooded Everglades ecosystem. Some green patches are shown surrounded by water. Historic Water Levels Offer Brief Glimpse of Life in a Restored Everglades National Park Water is the lifeblood of the Everglades. I know this to be true, and I tell other people about it a lot as a science communicator at Everglades National Park. I will admit, though, that until recently, our other mantra related to Everglades Restoration, “getting the water right,” seemed too good to be true. But the recent historic water levels in the Everglades and their effects have made me a believer. White and pink birds stand in water surrounded by grassy vegetation.

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