"Old Barracks Fifes and Drums in lower Manhattan" by NPS Photo , public domain

Federal Hall

National Memorial - New York

Federal Hall is the name given to the first of two historic buildings located at 26 Wall Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The original, a Federal style structure completed in 1703, served as New York's first City Hall. It was the site where the colonial Stamp Act Congress met to draft its message to King George III claiming entitlement to the same rights as the residents of Britain and protesting "taxation without representation". After the American Revolution, in 1785, the building served as meeting place for the Congress of the Confederation, the nation's first central government under the Articles of Confederation. With the establishment of the United States federal government in 1789, it was renamed Federal Hall, as it hosted the 1st Congress and was the place where George Washington was sworn in as the nation’s first president.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/feha/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Hall Federal Hall is the name given to the first of two historic buildings located at 26 Wall Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The original, a Federal style structure completed in 1703, served as New York's first City Hall. It was the site where the colonial Stamp Act Congress met to draft its message to King George III claiming entitlement to the same rights as the residents of Britain and protesting "taxation without representation". After the American Revolution, in 1785, the building served as meeting place for the Congress of the Confederation, the nation's first central government under the Articles of Confederation. With the establishment of the United States federal government in 1789, it was renamed Federal Hall, as it hosted the 1st Congress and was the place where George Washington was sworn in as the nation’s first president. Here on Wall Street, George Washington took the oath of office as our first President, and this site was home to the first Congress, Supreme Court, and Executive Branch offices. The current structure, a Customs House, later served as part of the US Sub-Treasury. Now, the building serves as a museum and memorial to our first President and the beginnings of the United States of America. The main entrance of Federal Hall is located at 26 Wall Street, near the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street in Manhattan's Financial District. The rear entrance, which is wheelchair accessible, is located at 15 Pine Street, near the intersection of Pine Street and Nassau Street. It is highly recommended that all visitors use mass transit when traveling to Federal Hall. Visitor Center When visiting Federal Hall, please stop by our visitor center, near the Pine Street entrance at the north end of the main floor. Here you will find a great deal of information about what we have to offer, and there will be a ranger to assist you. For further information call: (212) 825-6990 Tucked in among the pre-grid, named streets of old New York, Federal Hall National Memorial may be a little hard to find. Located in New York City's Financial District, at the intersection of Wall and Broad Streets, Federal Hall is at 26 Wall Street, diagonal to The New York Stock Exchange. Look for the statue of George Washington, welcoming you from our front steps! Federal Hall Interior “Large crowd inside the rotunda of Federal Hall National Memorial” Thousands of visitors each year visit Federal Hall National Memorial Find Your Park 2019 ad campaign starts with parks in NYC and San Francisco In the fall of 2019, the National Park Foundation rolled out new ads in San Francisco and New York for the Find Your Park campaign. From September 23 through October 28, a series of digital and static outdoor ads appeared in bus shelters, billboards, and other spaces in the city of New York and San Francisco. display ads featuring John Muir National Historic Site Document that inspired Bill of Rights on display at Federal Hall National Memorial Original Flushing Remonstrance, 1657, document showing damage caused to the document in a fire that swept through Albany in 1911. In 1657, Dutch settlers in what is now Flushing, Queens, wrote a demand for religious freedom that is today known as the Flushing Remonstrance. Today, the document is regarded as the precursor to the U.S. Constitution’s provision on freedom of religion on the Bill of Rights. Two pages of a document, written in old Dutch, with burn marks around the edges Eureka: 40-Foot High Sculpture on Display at Federal Hall National Memorial The sculpture Eureka does not recreate the facade of a canal house itself; rather it is the facade's rippled reflection in the flowing waterway. Its display in Federal Hall is meant to evoke a reflecting hall of mirrors, that suggests this site's architectural and political history. A 40-foot tall but ripped replica of a Dutch colonial structure stands inside Federal Hall.

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