"Musket Firing Demonstration" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Fort Donelson

National Battlefield - KY, TN

Fort Donelson National Battlefield preserves Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign, in which Union Army Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant and Flag Officer Andrew Hull Foote captured three Confederate forts and opened two rivers, the Tennessee River and the Cumberland River, to control by the Union Navy. The commanders received national recognition for their victories in February 1862, as they were the first major Union successes of the war. The capture of Fort Donelson and its garrison by the Union led to the capture of Tennessee's capital and industrial center, Nashville, which remained in Union hands from February 25, 1862 until the end of the war, and gave the Union effective control over much of Tennessee. This struck a major blow to the Confederacy early in the war. The main portion of the park, in Dover, Tennessee, commemorates the Battle of Fort Donelson. Fort Heiman, in nearby Calloway County, Kentucky, was a Confederate battery in the Battle of Fort Henry.

maps

Official visitor map of Fort Donelson National Battlefield (NB) in Kentucky and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Fort Donelson - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Fort Donelson National Battlefield (NB) in Kentucky and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natchez Trace - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/fodo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Point,_San_Francisco Fort Donelson National Battlefield preserves Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign, in which Union Army Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant and Flag Officer Andrew Hull Foote captured three Confederate forts and opened two rivers, the Tennessee River and the Cumberland River, to control by the Union Navy. The commanders received national recognition for their victories in February 1862, as they were the first major Union successes of the war. The capture of Fort Donelson and its garrison by the Union led to the capture of Tennessee's capital and industrial center, Nashville, which remained in Union hands from February 25, 1862 until the end of the war, and gave the Union effective control over much of Tennessee. This struck a major blow to the Confederacy early in the war. The main portion of the park, in Dover, Tennessee, commemorates the Battle of Fort Donelson. Fort Heiman, in nearby Calloway County, Kentucky, was a Confederate battery in the Battle of Fort Henry. Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant was becoming quite famous as he wrote these words following the surrender of Confederate Fort Donelson on Sunday, February 16, 1862. The Union victory at Fort Donelson elated the North, and stunned the South. Within days of the surrender, Clarksville and Nashville would fall into Union hands. Grant and his troops had created a pathway to victory for the Union. The main entrance is located at 120 Fort Donelson Park Road, in Dover Tennessee. It is advised to start a visitor experience here. Brochures and information are available at this location. Physical address for the park's Fort Heiman unit, in Calloway County, Kentucky: 682 Fort Heiman Road, New Concord, Kentucky. This site is not staffed daily, but exhibits and information are available for visitors. Fort Donelson Visitor Center The Visitor Center is located at the main park entrance, just off Highway 79. Museum exhibits, a gift shop, handicapped accessible restroom, and information are available for visitors. The park audiovisual films are available at our website under the link: https://www.nps.gov/fodo/planyourvisit/things2do.htm We encourage you to begin your visit at this location. GPS: 120 Fort Donelson Park Road, Dover, TN 37058 Main entrance located on Highway 79, 120 Fort Donelson Park Road, Dover, Tennessee, 37058 Upper River Battery The View from the Upper River Battery A commanding view of the Cumberland River from the Upper Artillery Battery Fort Donelson National Cemetery Hallowed ground. The Fort Donelson National Cemetery, final resting place for Soldiers who fell in battle during the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. Artillery at Fort Donelson NB cannon overlooking river Quiet Afternoon overlooking the Cumberland River, Fort Donelson NB The Dover Hotel Historic hotel The Dover Hotel, site of the first major Civil War surrender. Fort Donelson National Cemetery cemetery gate Fort Donelson National Cemetery: Final resting place for thousands of American Veterans Earthworks Confederate earthworks. A view of the earthworks, where Confederate Soldiers once stood watch. Volunteer Cannon Demonstration cannon and costumed volunteers Volunteers demonstrate Field Artillery at Fort Donelson NB Bald eagles in nest bald eagles nesting Bald Eagles perch on their Nest in the battlefield Picnic Area picnic tables Enjoy your lunch at the Picnic Area, Fort Donelson NB Field Artillery Demonstration Cannon drills during the 154th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Donelson Volunteers of the 9th Kentucky Infantry Re-enactors demonstrate field artillery Waysides interpret the history of the Free State wayside exhibit in the national cemetery Interpreting the story of the Underground Railroad and the Free State Community Spring flowers on the trails early spring native flowers Native plants found on park trails during springtime hikes Native Plants native plants found in the park Native flowers found on the battlefield trails Artillery Batteries at Fort Donelson NB Cannons on Lower River Battery Observation Deck on the Cumberland River Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. The Military Experience The course of the war was the cumulative result of political, economic, and social policies that affected (and were affected by) military operations and battles waged across a front spanning 2,000 miles. The battles and campaigns of 1861-65 ultimately demonstrated that the simple application of massive military force, even with innovations in technologies and tactics, was insufficient to resolve a conflict between two sections mobilized against one another politically, socia Engraving of soldier warming himself by a fire Photo of U.S. Sanitary Commission office. The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg Severing the Confederate Artery Early in the Civil War with the Union in desperate need of a victory, Ulysses S. Grant's capture of Forts Henry and Donelson electrified the North and began his rise to prominence. Photo of Ulysses S. Grant The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Friends to the End Colonel Almon Rockwell and James A. Garfield were lifelong friends who met at the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute. They were in the Civil War together and Almon was at President Garfield's bed side after he was shot by an assassin. Learn more about Colonel Rockwell and the friendship he had with President Garfield. an old photo of Colonel Almon Rockwell who is wearing a suit jacket and bow tie Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Kentucky and Tennessee Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] reenactment soldiers Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road. Grant at Fort Donelson By 1862, Grant was a brigadier-general commanding over 27,000 troops. Grant decided to attack Fort Donelson to achieve his goal of capturing the Confederate stronghold of Nashville. Two story building with a porch on the first and second floors; two red brick chimneys on the side. Series: The Odyssey of Ulysses An unknown 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S.-Mexican War later resigns the army. He rejoins and goes on to become lieutenant general of all Union armies. In his first term as President of the United States, he establishes Yellowstone National Park. From his first battle to his family home to his final resting place — the saga of Ulysses S. Grant is preserved in your National Parks. Color lithograph of Grant at the capture of the city of Mexico.

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