Fort Frederica

National Monument - Georgia

Fort Frederica National Monument, on St. Simons Island, Georgia, preserves the archaeological remnants of a fort and town built by James Oglethorpe between 1736 and 1748 to protect the southern boundary of the British colony of Georgia from Spanish raids. About 630 British troops were stationed at the fort. A town of up to 500 colonial residents had grown up outside the fort; it was laid out following principles of the Oglethorpe Plan for towns in the Georgia Colony. The town was named Frederica, after Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of King George II.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).Georgia State - Georgia Bike Map

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/fofr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Frederica_National_Monument Fort Frederica National Monument, on St. Simons Island, Georgia, preserves the archaeological remnants of a fort and town built by James Oglethorpe between 1736 and 1748 to protect the southern boundary of the British colony of Georgia from Spanish raids. About 630 British troops were stationed at the fort. A town of up to 500 colonial residents had grown up outside the fort; it was laid out following principles of the Oglethorpe Plan for towns in the Georgia Colony. The town was named Frederica, after Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of King George II. Georgia's fate was decided in 1742 when Spanish and British forces clashed on St. Simons Island. Fort Frederica's troops defeated the Spanish, ensuring Georgia's future as a British colony. Today, the archeological remnants of Frederica are protected by the National Park Service. Directions from Torras Causeway: at end of causeway, get in left lane. Follow left lane to traffic light. Go straight at light. Follow Sea Island Road to Frederica Road. Turn left at traffic light onto Frederica Road. Follow Frederica to roundabout. Take second exit of roundabout (still on Frederica). Go approximately 1 mile. Turn left onto park entrance road. Across from Wesley United Methodist Church. For detailed directions, clink the link below. Fort Frederica Visitor Center Start your tour of Ft. Frederica National Monument in the visitor center. Pick up orientation information at the desk, get your passport stamped, view the park film in the theater, look at the museum exhibits, try on colonial clothes, play colonial games, inquire about junior ranger programs, and shop in the Fort Frederica Association bookstore. Newly remodeled restrooms are located across the breezeway, and down the hallway, from the entrance to the visitor center South on I 95 to U.S. 17: Exit 38 and Left onto Spur 25. Follow Spur 25 until U.S. 17. Take a right on U.S. 17 (south). North on I 95 to U.S. 17: Exit 29 and Right onto U.S. 17. From US 17: Take Causeway to St. Simons Island. take first left onto Sea Island Rd. Go 1.5 miles to second traffic light, and Left onto Frederica Road. Follow Frederica Road for two miles (take second right off roundabout). The park entrance 300 yards past Christ Church. Ruin of Soldier Barracks at Fort Frederica NM Ruin of Soldier Barracks at Fort Frederica NM The Barracks ruin is one of the few above ground structures at Fort Frederica Artist rendering of Downtown Frederica Town Artist rendering of Downtown Frederica Town Artist rendering of Downtown Frederica Town Artist rendering of Downtown Frederica Town Artist rendering of Downtown Frederica Town Artist rendering of Downtown Frederica Town Artifacts found at Frederica Artifacts found at Frederica Artifacts found at Frederica Soldiers of the 42nd Regiment of Foote Reenactors performing as the original redcoats who served at Frederica Soldiers of the 42nd Regiment of Foote 100 year old grapevine at Frederica A large grapevine draped among the Live Oaks 100 year old grapevine at Frederica which still produces "Summer Grapes" Fort Frederica at Sunset The shadow of the ruin of Fort Frederica highlighted by a sunset along the Frederica River. Nature and History combine in a beautiful setting at Fort Frederica Fort Frederica's Visitor Center during Azalea Season Brick building of the Visitor Center with Azaleas blossoming in front Fort Frederica's Visitor Center during Azalea Season Teaching with Historic Places in the Parks: Digging History at Fort Frederica On the serene, isolated west shore of St. Simons Island, Georgia, the ruins of a once flourishing 18th-century settlement stand. A powder magazine overlooks Frederica River, a reminder of the fort that protected the British colonies against the Spanish during the early-18th-century struggle for control of the southern frontier of English occupation in the New World. Kids excavating at Fort Frederica 2018 GIS Colonial Frederica Town GIS Maps of Colonial Frederica Town at Fort Frederica National Monument Map of Georgia. SEAC and the Girl Scouts of America Pottery making at Camp for All Seasons Pottery making at Camp for All Seasons NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Frederica National Monument, Georgia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] reenactment soldiers Site Unseen: Remote Sensing at Fort Frederica SEAC archeologist Michelle Gray surveying a grid with the GPR unit. SEAC archeologist Michelle Gray surveying a grid with the GPR unit. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Creative Teaching with Historic Places: Selections from CRM Vol 23 no 8 (2000) These articles are a selection from a special issue of CRM Journal, "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" published in 2000. They provide examples of teaching using historic places both in and out of the classroom, helping students connect with history using the power of place, as well as how to prepare lessons making those connections. Teaching with Historic Places is a program of the National Park Service. Cover of CRM Journal "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" 2020 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Each year nearly 300,000 volunteers across the National Park Service (NPS) donate more than 6.5 million hours of service, for a value of more than $185 million. Through their extraordinary work and dedication, these volunteers make an exceptional contribution to their parks and communities. We are pleased to congratulate the national recipients of the 2020 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. Photo of Tom and Karen Hartley dressed in period clothing standing and smiling outdoors.

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