"Restored" by NPS/Mike Evans , public domain

Fort Laramie

National Historic Site - Wyoming

Fort Laramie was a significant 19th century trading post and diplomatic site located at the confluence of the Laramie River and the North Platte River in the upper Platte River Valley in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Wyoming. It sat at the bottom of the long climb leading to the best and lowest crossing point at South Pass into western descending valleys and so was a primary stopping point on the Oregon Trail. Along with Bent's Fort on the Arkansas River, the trading post and its supporting industries and businesses were the most significant economic hub of commerce in the region.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Casper Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Wyoming Public Land - Casper

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Casper Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/fola/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Laramie_National_Historic_Site Fort Laramie was a significant 19th century trading post and diplomatic site located at the confluence of the Laramie River and the North Platte River in the upper Platte River Valley in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Wyoming. It sat at the bottom of the long climb leading to the best and lowest crossing point at South Pass into western descending valleys and so was a primary stopping point on the Oregon Trail. Along with Bent's Fort on the Arkansas River, the trading post and its supporting industries and businesses were the most significant economic hub of commerce in the region. Originally established as a private fur trading fort in 1834, Fort Laramie evolved into the largest and best known military post on the Northern Plains before its abandonment in 1890. This “grand old post” witnessed the entire sweeping saga of America’s western expansion and Indian resistance to encroachment on their territories. The park is located in southeast Wyoming approximately 125 miles southeast of Casper, 100 miles north of Cheyenne and 55 miles west of Scottsbluff, Nebraska. From Interstate 25, take exit 92 to US Highway 26, proceed east to the town of Fort Laramie; turn right on State Route 160 and travel three miles to the park entrance. From westbound US 26, proceed west from Scottsbluff, Nebraska to the town of Fort Laramie; turn left on State Route 160 and continue three miles to the park entrance. Fort Laramie National Historic Site Visitor Center Start your tour at the Visitor Center. Located in the restored 1884 Commissary Storehouse, you can view an 18-minute orientation film, tour our museum, and browse our award-winning bookstore. The park is located in southeast Wyoming approximately 100 miles north of Cheyenne and 55 miles west of Scottsbluff. From Interstate-25, take exit 92 to US Highway 26, proceed east to the town of Fort Laramie; turn right on State Route 160 and travel 3 miles to the park entrance. From US Highways 26/85, go west from the town of Lingle on US 26 to the town of Fort Laramie; turn left on State Route 160 and travel 3 miles to the entrance gate. The visitor center is downhill from the parking lot. Ruins of the 1873 Post Hospital Ruins of the 1873 Post Hospital at dawn. Sunrises and sunsets are extraordinarily beautiful when set against the many historic structures the site. Parade Ground from the Porch of "Old Bedlam" View of the parade ground from the porch of "Old Bedlam". A fall view of the parade ground from "Old Bedlam" the oldest surviving structure at Fort Laramie and in the state of Wyoming, constructed in 1849. Post Trader at Work Living history interpreter portraying the Post Trader. In the summer living history interpreters bring the post to life, including the Post Trader in the refurnished 1849 store. Fur Trade Fort Laramie Event Living history interpreter explaining the life of a trapper/trader to young visitors Special attention is given to helping our young visitors understand the past at Fort Laramie National Historic Site. Arial View of Fort Laramie NHS From the South Aerial view of Fort Laramie NHS from the South Overview of Fort Laramie as it exists today with many of the historic buildings fully restored and refurnished and numerous other ruins and foundations. Tipis Across Laramie River in Fall Two tipis across the Laramie River from the fort in fall Tipis were a common scene at Fort Laramie from 1834-1872. At times, during treaty negotiations dozens of tipis could be found here. Fall colors on the Parade Ground Ash and cottonwood trees show their fall colors next to an open grass field. Fall colors paint the parade grounds near Old Bedlam. Powder Magazine in Winter Ruins of a concrete structure with snow on top. Ruins of the powder magazine within the winter snows. Morning Fog at the Old Holtclaw Tract A deer looking up in morning fog near the shelter belt at the old Holtclaw Tract homestead. Morning fog north of Fort Laramie 11th Kansas Ride Past the Cavalry Barracks A group of mounted individuals ride hors near a concrete historic structure. Riding past the Cavalry Barracks Three Affiliated Tribes Ride at Cavalry Barracks Native American people riding horses - some in traditional regalia - in front the Cavalry Barracks. Riding toward the parade ground Independence Day Salute Rangers in living history clothing fire a salute with Springfield rifles for Independence Day. A salute to each state of the union in 1876. Grand Teton National Park Fire Management Program Transfers Fire Engines to Rural Wyoming Fire Districts Grand Teton National Park Fire Management Program Transfers Fire Engines to Rural Wyoming Fire Districts Fire engine on a trailer ready to be transported Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. Plant Community Monitoring at Fort Laramie National Historic Site Fort Laramie National Historic Site may be only 833 acres in size, but it has a relatively large diversity of plants. The park is a mosaic of disturbed old fields, native prairie, and riparian (riverside) forests along the Laramie and North Platte rivers. Exotic plant species are abundant. We monitor plants to document long-term trends in plant communities and evaluate the effectiveness of management programs. Plant stalk with lots of yellow daisy-like flowers on it Bat Projects in Parks: Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Across six Northern Great Plains parks, education and outreach for bats was conducted. View of Badlands National Parks unique rock formations in the distance Bat Acoustic Monitoring at Fort Laramie National Historic Site Fort Laramie National Historic Site contains riparian forest along the North Platte and Laramie rivers that provide good roosting and foraging habitat for bats. The Fort grounds also attract bat species that roost in structures. The Northern Great Plains Inventory & Monitoring Network monitors bats using acoustic recorders to detect long-term trends in bat populations at the park. A redish brown bat hangs upside down while three grey baby bats cling to her fur The War and Westward Expansion With Federal resources focused on waging the war farther east, both native tribes and the Confederacy attempted to claim or reclaim lands west of the Mississippi. The Federal government responded with measures (Homestead Act, transcontinental railroad) and military campaigns designed to encourage settlement, solidify Union control of the trans-Mississippi West, and further marginalize the physical and cultural presence of tribes native to the West. Painting Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way showing settlers moving into the American west NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Wyoming Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. wetlands and fort Northern Great Plains Annual Brome Adaptive Management Project Management and restoration of high quality, mixed-grass prairie to the NPS units has proved difficult and complex. The Annual Brome Adaptive Management project (ABAM) is attacking this problem through a cooperative effort. A firefighter uses a driptorch to ignite dried grasses while dark smoke billows behind. Fort Laramie NHS Cultural Landscape From 1849 to 1890, Fort Laramie served as the base of operations for major military campaigns on the northern Plains and significant councils with many of the major mountain and plains tribes. The fort embraces the entire spectrum of westward expansion from the hey-day of mountain men, the long period of the overland migrations, major treaty councils with indigenous tribes and the conflicts that followed, to the arrival of cattlemen and homesteaders. Aerial View of Fort Laramie National Historic Site (NPS) Series: Prairie Ecology of the Badlands Badlands National Park is home to the nation's largest expanse of mixed-grass prairie. Here, plant species from both short-grass and tall-grass prairies mingle to create a unique home, well suited to many animals which call the park home. roots of tall yellow grasses penetrate into light brown soil beneath a cloudy blue sky. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Plant Community Monitoring in Northern Great Plains Network Parks Plant communities are essential components of all major ecosystems. Plants are the ultimate source of food for other organisms and the main source of organic material in soil and water. They also influence climate and provide the scenery that park visitors enjoy. The NPS Northern Great Plains Network monitors the number, identity, and relative abundance of plant species, as well as their horizontal cover and vertical structure, to determine the health of park ecosystems. Two people sitting on the ground looking at plants Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 (Horse Creek Treaty) Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 (Horse Creek Treaty)

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