"Views of Fort Matanzas National Monument, Florida" by National Park Service , public domain

Fort Matanzas

National Monument - Florida

Fort Matanzas National Monument consists of a 1740 Spanish fort called Fort Matanzas, and about 100 acres (0.4 km²) of salt marsh and barrier islands along the Matanzas River on the northern Atlantic coast of Florida. It is operated by the National Park Service in conjunction with the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument in the city of St. Augustine.

maps

Official visitor map of Fort Matanzas National Monument (NM) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Fort Matanzas - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Fort Matanzas National Monument (NM) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/foma/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Matanzas_National_Monument Fort Matanzas National Monument consists of a 1740 Spanish fort called Fort Matanzas, and about 100 acres (0.4 km²) of salt marsh and barrier islands along the Matanzas River on the northern Atlantic coast of Florida. It is operated by the National Park Service in conjunction with the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument in the city of St. Augustine. Fort Matanzas National Monument preserves the fortified coquina watchtower, completed in 1742, which defended the southern approach to the Spanish military settlement of St. Augustine. It also protects approximately 300 acres of Florida coastal environment containing dunes, marsh, maritime forest, and associated flora and fauna, including threatened and endangered species. Fort Matanzas is 14 miles south of Saint Augustine on State Route A1A. Visitor Center Welcome to Fort Matanzas National Monument. Our site is located at 8635 A1A South, St. Augustine, FL 32080. Upon arrival at the park, you will circle the picnic area and see our visitor center. The parking spaces will lead you to the public restrooms and a sidewalk that directs you to our visitor center. There is limited parking and the parking lot often fills up fast. Ferry Boarding Passes are available at this location. Behind the Visitor Center is the dock where the ferry departs. Fort Matanzas National Monument is located about 14 miles south of the historic district of St. Augustine, Florida. St. Augustine is located on Florida's Northeastern Atlantic coast about midway between Jacksonville and Daytona Beach. From I-95: Take exit 305 (Route 206). Follow Route 206 east about 6 miles to Highway A1A. Turn right and follow A1A south for 4 miles to the park entrance on the right side of the road. Fort Matanzas Fort Matanzas, a fortified watch tower made form coquina. Fort Matanzas sits on Rattlesnake Island in the middle of the Matanzas River. Visitor Center Two story building with stone base and wood second floor, oak trees, grass, two signs. Here you can find information about the fort tour, exhibits, park movie, passport stamp, and more. Nature Trail A nature trail boardwalk with seating area. Follow an elevated boardwalk through some pristine Florida barrier island habitat. Soldier's Quarters Wooden bunks and uniform items in the soldier's quarters. The few enlisted soldiers at Fort Matanzas shared a small, sparse room as living space. Protecting the riverway The cannon of Fort Matanzas point toward the river's inlet. Fort Matanzas protected the southern river approach to Saint Augustine. Recreational Opportunities People wading in the river and relaxing on the beach. More the half-a-million people visit Fort Matanzas each year to enjoy both the river and ocean beaches. Archaeology Activity "One man's trash is another man's treasure." What?! Complete an archaeology activity to discover how "trash" can teach us a lot about people from the past. Shell Midden Mound, a hill with shells and grass. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Matanzas National Monument, Georgia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] Fort Matanzas National Monument, Florida Fort Matanzas Bark Ranger Do you like exploring Fort Matanzas with your canine friend? Learn about the B.A.R.K. Ranger program! Image of a dog on leash on the beach at Fort Matanzas Build Your Own Cannon Experience a cannon firing, examine 3D models of artillery, and build your own paper cannon. Cannon with two Spanish soldiers and flag on gun deck of Castillo. Fort Matanzas Virtual Ranger Become a Virtual Ranger at Fort Matanzas National Monument! Image of Virtual Ranger arrowhead, images of a computer screen, and fort outline. Colonial Games Learn about colonial games and make your own toy. Two children are playing checkers in the grass. Cannon Experiment Did you know cannons harnessed the power of a chemical reaction to function? Discover more by conducting an experiment using the scientific method to produce a chemical reaction with an Alka-Seltzer cannon. Apply what you learn about chemical reactions to the loading and firing of cannon to understand the reality faced by the gun crews at the Castillo and Fort Matanzas. Cannon Diagram Turtle Activity Discover the fascinating world of sea turtles! Explore videos, images, and activities! Image of a loggerhead sea turtle hatchling. Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Fixed Station Monitoring Estuaries are the convergence of freshwater, delivered by rivers, to the ocean's salty sea water. The result is a delicate ecosystem providing existence for a multitude of fish and wildlife species. we have created the story map to help you learn more about how these estuaries formed, the potential issues they face, and the process of monitoring the water quality utilizing fixed station monitoring. Waterbirds congregate in an estuary at sunset. Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Park-wide Assessments Estuaries located in national parks provide recreational experiences such as fishing and boating for park visitors. Therefore, knowing what's in the water can assist the park in its mission of managing such a critcal resource. The Southeast Coast Network monitors water quality through fixed station monitoring and park-wide assessments. While the former is conducted on a monthly basis, park-wide assessments are completed every five years. Learn more with this story map. Dock stretching out into an estuary as the sun sets over the water. Coloring Pages - Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas Looking for a home or classroom activity for the kids? Enjoy these coloring pages that were created by rangers and volunteers! Young boy with coloring page of a cartoon fort soldier Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Sustainability at Fort Matanzas Explore opportunities to protect resources in the park and at home. Photograph of a water refill station at Fort Matanzas. Build Your Own Fort Do you have what it takes to defend your town? Construct your own fort out of materials you have at home! Image of sand castle on beach. Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas National Monuments Cultural Landscapes Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas, both in present-day northeastern Florida, represent the best-preserved evidence of the Spanish Empire’s 287-year presence in southeastern North America. The oldest masonry fortification remaining in the continental United States, Castillo de San Marcos formed the core of a system of defenses. The fort landscapes reflect conventions of military engineering and the later changes and preservation efforts by the U.S. War Department. A furnace in an area of turf between the masonry wall of a fort and a seawall alongside water.

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