"Fort Aerial" by FOMC SM Team , public domain

Fort McHenry

National Monument and Historic Shrine - Maryland

Fort McHenry is a historical American coastal pentagonal bastion fort located in the Locust Point neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland. It is best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy from the Chesapeake Bay on September 13–14, 1814. During the War of 1812 an American storm flag, 17 by 25 feet (5.2 m × 7.6 m), was flown over Fort McHenry during the bombardment. It was replaced early on the morning of September 14, 1814 with a larger American garrison flag, 30 by 42 feet (9.1 m × 12.8 m). The larger flag signaled American victory over the British in the Battle of Baltimore. The sight of the ensign inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" that was later set to the tune "To Anacreon in Heaven" and became known as "The Star Spangled Banner", the national anthem of the United States.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/fomc/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_McHenry Fort McHenry is a historical American coastal pentagonal bastion fort located in the Locust Point neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland. It is best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy from the Chesapeake Bay on September 13–14, 1814. During the War of 1812 an American storm flag, 17 by 25 feet (5.2 m × 7.6 m), was flown over Fort McHenry during the bombardment. It was replaced early on the morning of September 14, 1814 with a larger American garrison flag, 30 by 42 feet (9.1 m × 12.8 m). The larger flag signaled American victory over the British in the Battle of Baltimore. The sight of the ensign inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" that was later set to the tune "To Anacreon in Heaven" and became known as "The Star Spangled Banner", the national anthem of the United States. by the dawn's early light, a large red, white and blue banner? Whose broad stripes and bright stars... were so gallantly streaming...over Fort McHenry! The valiant defense of the fort during the Battle of Baltimore on September 13-14, 1814 inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words that became the U.S. national anthem. The fort's history holds many other stories too, from the Civil War to WWII. The park is three miles southeast of the Baltimore Inner Harbor and just off I-95. Follow the brown Fort McHenry directional signs along all major routes to the park. From I-95 northbound, take Exit 55 Key Highway and follow Fort McHenry signs. Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine Visitor Center The Fort McHenry Visitor Center is open daily from 9:00 am - 5:45 pm. There is currently a mask mandate that REQUIRES all visitors and staff to wear a mask inside the building regardless of vaccination status. Inside the visitor center is an introductory museum, a movie (plays every 30 minutes), the park bookstore, and restrooms. The visitor center and museum are free to go through. Visitors looking to purchase entrance passes to the Star Fort Historic Zone or an America the Beautiful pass can do so here. The park is three miles southeast of the Baltimore Inner Harbor and just off I-95. Follow the brown Fort McHenry directional signs along all major routes to the park. From I-95 northbound, take Exit 55 Key Highway and follow Fort McHenry signs. Once inside the park gates follow the park road to the main parking lot. The visitor center is located directly adjacent of the main parking lot. Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine Fort McHenry Blue Angels fly over Fort McHenry Fort McHenry’s Ranger Paul Plamann Celebrates 50 Years of Service After completing his service in the U.S. Army in 1967, Paul Plamann noticed a job listing at Fort McHenry in his hometown of Baltimore. Upon applying he was asked “do you know how to operate a film projector?” To this, he answered “yes” and so began a 50-year career as a ranger in the National Park Service. Two photos together. A younger Paul in ranger uniform and an older Paul in a period costume. Fort McHenry’s Volunteers Bring the Home of the Brave to Life On April 1st as part of a Baltimore’s Light City Festival, Fort McHenry NMHS hosted an evening tour of the old Star Fort. By candlelight volunteers guided over 200 visitors through 170 years of history interpreting Fort McHenry’s role as the “sentinel of the harbor.” Rangers pose with men and women in period costumes. PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space The Border States The existence of divided populations in Border States had a profound impact on Union and Confederate strategy-both political and military. Each side undertook military and political measures--including brutal guerilla warfare-- in their attempts to control areas of divided loyalty and hostile moral and political views held by local civilians. Painting showing removal of Missouri civilians from their homes by Union troops Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail e-Newsletter Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail, WARO quarterly e-newsletter Preserving Places of Captivity: Civil War Military Prisons in the National Parks During the Civil War, over 400,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were held prisoner at more than 150 diff erent prison sites. Approximately 56,000 of these died in captivity. Although Andersonville is the most famous Civil War prison, it is only one of many Civil War military prisons that are preserved by the National Park Service. Fort McHenry and the National Aquarium Celebrate 20 Years of Shared Stewardship on National Public Lands Day As National Public Lands Day began at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine, over 110 volunteers, work gloves, water bottles, and waders in hand, made their way to the registration tent. Established in 1999 through a partnership between the National Park Service and the National Aquarium, the wetlands cleanup project has enlisted the help of over 6,000 volunteers over the past 20 years. Advancements in Medical Care during World War I The advanced weaponry of World War I, such as chemical agents and trench warfare, created a uniquely afflicted veteran population not seen before. The medical facilities at the fort included several departments that pioneered new treatment strategies and new technology that were designed to tailor to the needs of the victims of this modern war. Salvation Army Poster depicts a cloaked woman sheltering the infirm. War of 1812: Burning of the Sewall House Why did British troops burn down Robert Sewall's house on August 24, 1814? Collaboration is Key to Telling the Story of Women's Suffrage and the 19th Amendment Baltimore National Heritage Area hosted a 19th Amendment workshop at Fort McHenry. The workshop, designed to increase collaboration between groups and allow participants to better tell the story of the 19th amendment, was led by NPS 19th Amendment Coordinators. 19 organizations attended and collaborated. Participants of the 19th Amendment Workshop talk with each other in a conference room. The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg "At early dawn his eye was again greeted by the proudly-waving flag of his country" The British 1814 failure to capture Baltimore Harbor helped change the course of the War of 1812 and inspired the American national anthem. Illustration of British ships bombarding Fort McHenry Creating symbols of the American Nation The War of 1812 served as an important turning point for establishing a sense of sovereignty and a shared history among Americans. But it also helped to develop distinct mythology for the young nation -- from Uncle Sam to the Star-Spangled Banner. US Navy recruiting poster with Uncle Sam pointing finger to YOU The Civil War in American Memory America's cultural memories of the Civil War are inseparably intertwined with that most "peculiar institution" of American history - racial slavery. But in the struggle over Civil War memory which began as soon as the war was over and continues to this day, rival cultural memories of reconciliation and white supremacy have often prevailed. Therein lies the challenge as the National Park Service - a public agency - seeks to "provide understanding" of the Civil War era's lasting impact upon the development of our nation. Elderly Union and Confederate veterans shake hands at the fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg The Pratt Street Riot The April 19, 1861 riots in Baltimore showed the country how divided the border states were and strengthened Union resolve to save the capital from secessionists. Many prints and newspaper depictions of the event, varying greatly in accuracy, rolled off Northern printing presses. Frank Leslie's Illustrated print of the Pratt Street Riot The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: Legacies: The War of 1812 in American Memory If the War of 1812 played a more important role in American public memory, it would likely have earned a less generic name. The war is the only one in American history designated simply by the year of its commencement, and for nearly a hundred years after it ended in 1815, its name hardly even qualified as a proper noun. Historian Matthew Dennis examines the legacies of the War of 1812 and the space it occupies in American memory. War of 1812 Veterans

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