"Cannons inside fort" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Fort Pulaski

National Monument - Georgia

Fort Pulaski National Monument is located on Cockspur Island between Savannah and Tybee Island, Georgia. It preserves Fort Pulaski, where in 1862 during the American Civil War, the Union Army successfully tested rifled cannon in combat, the success of which rendered brick fortifications obsolete. The fort was also used as a prisoner-of-war camp. The National Monument includes most of Cockspur Island (containing the fort) and all of adjacent McQueens Island.

maps

Official visitor map of Fort Pulaski National Monument (NM) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Fort Pulaski NM - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Fort Pulaski National Monument (NM) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).Georgia State - Georgia Bike Map

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/fopu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Pulaski_National_Monument Fort Pulaski National Monument is located on Cockspur Island between Savannah and Tybee Island, Georgia. It preserves Fort Pulaski, where in 1862 during the American Civil War, the Union Army successfully tested rifled cannon in combat, the success of which rendered brick fortifications obsolete. The fort was also used as a prisoner-of-war camp. The National Monument includes most of Cockspur Island (containing the fort) and all of adjacent McQueens Island. For much of the 19th century, masonry fortifications were the United States’ main defense against overseas enemies. However, during the Civil War, new technology proved its superiority to these forts. The Union army used rifled cannon and compelled the Confederate garrison inside Fort Pulaski to surrender. The siege was a landmark experiment in the history of military science and invention. From Interstate I-95, take Exit 99 onto Interstate I-16 East (James L Gillis Memorial Hwy) for 7 miles. Take Exit 164A onto Interstate I-516 East toward US-80 East. Take Exit 3 (US-17 S/US-80 E) toward US-80 East. Turn left onto Ocean Highway, Ogeechee Rd (US-17 N, US-80 East). Bear right onto West Victory Drive (US-80 East). Continue on US-80 East for 13 miles. GPS Coordinates for Fort Pulaski National Monument: N32° 01.680 W080° 53.525 Fort Pulaski Visitor Center The Fort Pulaski Visitor Center is located next to the main visitor parking area and historic Fort Pulaski. Here you can watch the park film, check out a variety of exhibits about Fort Pulaski, and get park and program information for a wonderful visit to the national monument. From Interstate I-95, take Exit 99 onto Interstate I-16 East (James L Gillis Memorial Hwy) for 7 miles. Take Exit 164A onto Interstate I-516 East toward US-80 East. Take Exit 3 (US-17 S/US-80 E) toward US-80 East. Turn left onto Ocean Highway, Ogeechee Rd (US-17 N, US-80 East). Bear right onto West Victory Drive (US-80 East). Continue on US-80 East for 13 miles. Fort Pulaski National Monument entrance will be on the left hand side of US-80; the entrance is just after a turn in the highway. The Battered Walls of Fort Pulaski The red masonry walls of Fort Pulaski still show battle damage over 150 years later. A walk along the outside of Fort Pulaski reveals damaged walls over 150 years after the Civil War. The Casemates of a Fort The brick of the fort glow in the late afternoon light. The arches inside the fort reveal a cannon i Fort Pulaski shows off its classic arched architecture and cannon. The Cockspur Island Lighthouse The white masonry Cockspur Island lighthouse sits in the Savannah River. The Cockspur Island Lighthouse still stands guard over the south channel of the Savannah River and Fort Pulaski. The Sentinel A great blue heron stands watch on top of the fort's brick walls. A great blue heron stands on the top of Fort Pulaski like a lonely sentinel. The Ladies of a Fort Two women dressed in mid nineteenth century civilian attire watch through looking glasses Volunteer living historians play an important role for the National Park Service and Fort Pulaski National Monument. Traditional Trades Apprenticeship Program’s Rodney Flora A veteran of the U.S. Navy, Rodney Flora applied to the Historic Preservation Training Center’s Traditional Trades Apprenticeship Program (TTAP) after graduating from Shepherd University. Find out how this veteran found his passion in manual labor, not unlike his military experience. Rodney Flora stands to the right of five other crew and staff members. Preserving Places of Captivity: Civil War Military Prisons in the National Parks During the Civil War, over 400,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were held prisoner at more than 150 diff erent prison sites. Approximately 56,000 of these died in captivity. Although Andersonville is the most famous Civil War prison, it is only one of many Civil War military prisons that are preserved by the National Park Service. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Pulaski National Monument, South Carolina Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] aerial view of fort and surrounding landscape Third System of Coastal Forts How should a country protect its borders? The United States had to consider this question when the War of 1812 ended in 1815. One year later, the federal government believed it had an answer. The nation created a broad national defense strategy that included a new generation of waterfront defenses called the Third System of Coastal Fortifications. Seacoast Ordnance Cannon manufactured for use in Third System forts are called seacoast ordnance. These were some of the largest and heaviest cannon available at the time. Cannon at forts Pickens, McRee, Barrancas, Massachusetts, and Advanced Redoubt fell into three categories: guns, howitzers, and mortars. Each had a specific purpose. A cannon is mounted over a brick wall, an American flag is flying to the left. The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg National Parks Defend America's Coast During World War II Many national park sites joined the war effort in World War II by erecting Aircraft Warning, radio and radar stations. Some historic forts came to life with coastal defenses ready to defend the nation. color photo of explosion atop a fort wall, ocean beyond The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Fixed Station Monitoring Estuaries are the convergence of freshwater, delivered by rivers, to the ocean's salty sea water. The result is a delicate ecosystem providing existence for a multitude of fish and wildlife species. we have created the story map to help you learn more about how these estuaries formed, the potential issues they face, and the process of monitoring the water quality utilizing fixed station monitoring. Waterbirds congregate in an estuary at sunset. Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Park-wide Assessments Estuaries located in national parks provide recreational experiences such as fishing and boating for park visitors. Therefore, knowing what's in the water can assist the park in its mission of managing such a critcal resource. The Southeast Coast Network monitors water quality through fixed station monitoring and park-wide assessments. While the former is conducted on a monthly basis, park-wide assessments are completed every five years. Learn more with this story map. Dock stretching out into an estuary as the sun sets over the water. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Shoreline FAQ Frequently Asked Questions & Answers regarding the Cockspur Island North shoreline. A sandy shoreline with historic pier foundations on a cloudy day with a river in the background. Words Have Power Words Have Power Causes of Deafness During the Civil War Civil War soldiers faced death on a daily basis. However, they also faced going home with various disabilities. One such disability was partial or complete deafness. Many soldiers were accustomed to temporary deafness from the constant artillery fire in the field. However, illness, the environment, and even the medicine the doctors used on patients could cause a much more permanent hearing loss. 102 Cases of Deafness.Prepared 4 Consideration of senate & house of reps. by Wallace E. Foster.

also available

National Parks
USFS NW