"2013 Virginia Dare Faire Colonists" by National Park Service , public domain

Fort Raleigh

National Historic Site - North Carolina

Fort Raleigh National Historic Sit e preserves the location of Roanoke Colony, the first English settlement in the present-day United States. The site was preserved for its national significance in relation to the founding of the first English settlement in North America in 1587. The colony, which was promoted and backed by entrepreneurs led by Englishman Sir Walter Raleigh (ca. 1554–1618), failed sometime between 1587 and 1590 when supply ships failed to arrive on time. When next visited, the settlement was abandoned with no survivors found. The fate of the "Lost Colony" remains a mystery. The historic site is off U.S. Highway 64 on the north end of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, about 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the town of Manteo. The visitor center's museum contains exhibits about the history of the English expeditions and colonies, the Roanoke Colony, and the island's Civil War history and Freedmen's Colony (1863-1867).

maps

Official Visitor Map of Fort Raleigh National Historic Site (NHS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Fort Raleigh - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Fort Raleigh National Historic Site (NHS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Cape Hatteras National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cape Hatteras - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cape Hatteras National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/fora/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Raleigh_National_Historic_Site Fort Raleigh National Historic Sit e preserves the location of Roanoke Colony, the first English settlement in the present-day United States. The site was preserved for its national significance in relation to the founding of the first English settlement in North America in 1587. The colony, which was promoted and backed by entrepreneurs led by Englishman Sir Walter Raleigh (ca. 1554–1618), failed sometime between 1587 and 1590 when supply ships failed to arrive on time. When next visited, the settlement was abandoned with no survivors found. The fate of the "Lost Colony" remains a mystery. The historic site is off U.S. Highway 64 on the north end of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, about 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the town of Manteo. The visitor center's museum contains exhibits about the history of the English expeditions and colonies, the Roanoke Colony, and the island's Civil War history and Freedmen's Colony (1863-1867). Fort Raleigh National Historic Site protects and preserves known portions of England's first New World settlements from 1584 to 1590. This site also preserves the cultural heritage of the Native Americans, European Americans and African Americans who have lived on Roanoke Island. Fort Raleigh National Historic Site is located on the northern end of Roanoke Island, north of the town of Manteo, NC. Lindsay Warren Visitor Center The visitor center of Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, housing immersive exhibits on the Algonquian, the English, the Roanoke Island Freedmen's Colony, the Civil War Battle of Roanoke Island, and Reginald Fessenden. A 17-minute dramatic video on the interaction between the Algonquian and the English is displayed in the visitor center's theater. Fort Raleigh National Historic Site is located on the north end of Roanoke Island, about 4 miles north of the town of Manteo, North Carolina, along US 64/264. First Light of Freedom Back of the monument commemorating the Roanoke Island Freedmen's Colony Commemorating the Roanoke Island Freedmen's Colony Thomas Hariot Trail Tree standing next to the maritime forest path of the Thomas Hariot Trail Venture through a maritime forest Crucible Artifact Pieces of a crucible left behind by the 1585 English expedition Shards unearthed here provide clues to the English expedition of 1585 Waterside Theatre Stage of the Waterside Theatre with a view of the Roanoke Sound in the background Home of The Lost Colony drama performed every summer The Freedmen's Colony on Roanoke Island Roanoke Island is most famous for its "Lost Colony" of the 1580s, but 280 years later was the scene of another bold experiment on a new frontier. Following its capture by Union forces in 1862, Roanoke Island became the site of a Freedmen's Colony for newly freed African Americans, where education and a new way of living could be experienced. Photo of African American refugee family Piracy and Privateering in the Elizabethan New World Piracy, privateering, and colonization of the New World went hand-in-hand in the sixteenth century. If not for the prospect of raiding Spanish shipping, it is unlikely that England would have made multiple attempts to colonize Roanoke Island in the 1580s. Thomas Hariot image of the English arrival at Roanoke Island in 1584 1590 Voyage John White's return to Roanoke Island in 1590 only deepened the mystery as to the fate of the 117 men, women, and children left on Roanoke Island in 1587. White was delayed in his return to Roanoke Island by approximately two years, as England had to devote the majority of its vessels to the conflict with the Spanish Armada. When John White was finally able to return to Roanoke Island, he found no signs of life and only sporadic clues as to the colonists' fate. Illustration of John White and others viewing Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house Fire Prevention 52: Remembering Our Losses—Waterside Theater Complex Three buildings, including a costume shop housing 5,000 vintage costumes created by well-known designers, designer sketches, and photos, were destroyed by fire in the Waterside Theatre complex at Fort Raleigh NHS in 2007. The monetary loss was $2-3 million, but the cultural loss was incalculable. By learning about significant NPS fires, we can help prevent further tragedy. Includes questions to increase your fire risk awareness. Exterior image of Wayside Theater by the water The Carolina Algonquian When the English first landed on the Outer banks in 1584, they were greeted by a native population who predated them by centuries. The Carolina Algonquian were a complex people, with effective fishing and hunting methods, a unique religion, and populous town centers. John White illustration of Algonquian fishing techniques, 1585 Wildlife at Fort Raleigh Learn about the diverse wildlife at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, from the lowly mosquito to the mighty American Bald Eagle. Osprey perched on driftwood Archeology at Fort Raleigh Since the 1890s, archeology has played an important role in our understanding of the diverse history of Roanoke Island. While the location of the "lost colony" and the fate of the colonists remains unknown, the advancements made by archeology constantly bring us one step closer to unravelling the mystery. Two tin-glazed earthenware fragments unearthed in 2016. The Battle of Roanoke Island The Battle of Roanoke Island, fought on February 7th and 8th, 1862, was a crucial victory for the Union. With the defeat of Confederate forces on the island, the Union established a much-needed foothold along the east coast of North Carolina, using Roanoke Island as a staging area to enter the interior of the state. Contemporary depiction of Union charge at Battle of Roanoke Island. The Civil War on Roanoke Island The Civil War on Roanoke Island was highly influential in determining the outcome of the war. Not only did Union occupation after the Battle of Roanoke Island in February, 1862 ensure a permanent foothold on the North Carolina coast, the occupation led to the establishment of a Freedmen's Colony on the northwest portion of the island. Lithograph of Burnside's landing at Roanoke Island, February 1862. Reginald Fessenden's Radio Experiments Reginald Fessenden's wireless radio experiments from Roanoke Island in 1901 and 1902 forever altered the way humans communicate. His achievements at Roanoke Island allowed for the clear transmission of the human voice over radio waves for the first time in history. Portrait of Reginald Fessenden, early 1900s Navigating the Atlantic World How did the English expeditions make it to Roanoke Island? Maritime navigation in the Elizabethan era was surprisingly complex and accurate. Many instruments and methods were used to ensure swift and accurate passage across the Atlantic. Detail of a decorative element Commemorating Fort Raleigh The history of commemorating the site of the first English expeditions to the New World is in many ways as fascinating as the expeditions themselves. From the nineteenth century to the present, many steps have been taken to ensure that Fort Raleigh remains in American memory. Virginia Dare marker in 1896 with five people gathered around it Be A Junior Ranger! The Junior Ranger program is a fun way to protect and learn about the park! Find out how you can become a Junior Ranger! Three Junior Rangers being sworn in at Fort Raleigh NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, North Carolina Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] waterside theatre Ships of the Roanoke Voyages A concise description of the various vessels used by England in the expeditions to Roanoke Island from 1584 to 1590. 16th-century illustration of rigging on a vessel 1587: The Lost Colony The third English expedition to the New World, the 1587 voyage is referred to as the "Lost Colony." 117 men, women, and children under John White arrived at Roanoke Island in July. The island was not their intended destination; rather, the colonists were supposed to disembark along the Chesapeake Bay farther north. The flotilla's commander, Simon Fernandes, refused to take them any farther than Roanoke Island, for fear that summer was ending too rapidly. 1587 carving at Fort Raleigh visitor center 1584: The First English Voyage The first English expedition to the New World, the 1584 voyage was solely a reconnaissance mission. Supported by Queen Elizabeth I and organized by Sir Walter Raleigh, the expedition was led by Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe. It was significant for not only discovering Roanoke Island as a possible location for a colony, but also for the return to England with two Carolina Algonquian, Manteo and Wanchese, on board. Contemporary drawing of English arrival on the Outer Banks. 1585: The Military Colony The second English expedition to the New World, the 1585 voyage lent Fort Raleigh National Historic Site its name. Sailing from England with 600 men, the expedition was commanded by both Sir Richard Grenville and Ralph Lane. The animosity between Grenville and Lane, coupled with damage to ships and cargo along the way, caused the expedition to leave only 100 of the 600 men on Roanoke Island. Painting of the earthen fort, constructed during the 1585 expedition. The Evergreen Maritime Forest The evergreen maritime forest at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site is an ecosystem unique to the Outer Banks. Learn about the wide variety of trees and plants that make up this landscape. Live oak covered in Spanish moss Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains

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