"View from Lincoln's theatre box, Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, 2007." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Ford's Theatre

National Historic Site - District of Columbia

Ford's Theatre is a theater located in Washington, D.C., which opened in August 1863. It is famous for being the site of the assassination of United States President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. After being shot, the fatally wounded 56-year old president was carried across the street to the Petersen House, where he died the next morning. The Petersen House and the theater are preserved together as Ford's Theatre National Historic Site.

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Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Mall and Memorial Parks - National Heritage Areas

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

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Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

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Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/foth/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford's_Theatre Ford's Theatre is a theater located in Washington, D.C., which opened in August 1863. It is famous for being the site of the assassination of United States President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. After being shot, the fatally wounded 56-year old president was carried across the street to the Petersen House, where he died the next morning. The Petersen House and the theater are preserved together as Ford's Theatre National Historic Site. April 14, 1865. President Lincoln is assassinated at Ford’s Theatre. Discover how a nation handled grief and loss, how everyday people experienced a national tragedy, and how we have remembered a fallen leader. Today, in partnership with Ford’s Theatre Society, live dramatic productions highlight Lincoln’s love of the theatre, and the power of stories to connect us to ourselves and our history. Ford's Theatre National Historic Site is located on 10th Street between E and F streets. The site is within walking distance of the Metro stops at Metro Center and Gallery Place. Parking garages and metered street parking are located nearby. Ford's Theatre Front Picture of the front of Ford's Theatre Where a nations destiny was met. Ford's Theatre Box Presidential Box at Ford's Theatre Where President Lincoln was shot Peterson House Front of Peterson House Place where Lincoln died. Ford's Theatre Interior Three levels of auditorium style seating with red carpeting and upholstered seats Ford's Theatre Interior National Mall and Memorial Parks - 2018 Partnership Report Our generous partners and volunteers provided more than $34 million in philanthropic contributions in 2018 helping us fund preservation projects, programs, commemorations, and celebrations. Aerial photo of the Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool Petersen House Fire Suppression System The Petersen House (House Where Lincoln Died) will be closed for preservation work starting on Monday, December 25, 2017 and lasting until June of 2018. The work will include replacing the existing fire suppression system, updating historic furnishings, and general preservation and maintenance work on the historic structure. Exterior view of Petersen House (House Where Lincoln Died) Tina Short: Listening to the Community Tina Short was one of the first African American women to serve as a Park Ranger in the National Capital Region. A native of Washington, D.C., Ms. Short spent her career at Fort Dupont Park, the very place she had attended as a day camper and became a Junior Ranger. Short became a well-known figure in the neighborhood, building programs that are still popular to this day. Woman park ranger in uniform Trail of Twelve Stones The Trail of Twelve Stones is a unique way to review some of the major events in Abraham Lincoln's life. Beginning just east of the Cabin Site Memorial, twelve historic stones area arranged in chronological order at irregular intervals. This trail guide, and the small bronze tablets located near each stone, briefly explain the events in Lincoln's life associated with each of the memorial stones. Several shaded, stone-bench rest areas are provided for your convenience. Trail to large stone set in middle of trail surrounded by forest with bright green leaves Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo Abraham Lincoln: The War Years 1861-1865 No president up to that point in American history was called on to be commander-in-chief like Abraham Lincoln. From monitoring the War Department telegraph office to selecting of commanding generals and developing military strategy, Lincoln guided the nation through its darkest hour. Abraham Lincoln and General George McClellan following the Battle of Antietam The Civil War in American Memory America's cultural memories of the Civil War are inseparably intertwined with that most "peculiar institution" of American history - racial slavery. But in the struggle over Civil War memory which began as soon as the war was over and continues to this day, rival cultural memories of reconciliation and white supremacy have often prevailed. Therein lies the challenge as the National Park Service - a public agency - seeks to "provide understanding" of the Civil War era's lasting impact upon the development of our nation. Elderly Union and Confederate veterans shake hands at the fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg National Mall and Memorial Parks - 2019 Partnership Report Our generous partners and volunteers provided more than $34 million in philanthropic contributions in 2018 helping us fund preservation projects, programs, commemorations, and celebrations. Aerial photo of the Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. Robert Todd Lincoln and Presidential Assassiations Robert Todd Lincoln, son of President and First Lady Lincoln, had the misfortune to be at the site of three Presidents of the United States. Read about occassion and how Robert Todd Lincoln was connected. a young man in his early twenties posing for a picture wearing a suit jacket Friends to the End Colonel Almon Rockwell and James A. Garfield were lifelong friends who met at the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute. They were in the Civil War together and Almon was at President Garfield's bed side after he was shot by an assassin. Learn more about Colonel Rockwell and the friendship he had with President Garfield. an old photo of Colonel Almon Rockwell who is wearing a suit jacket and bow tie Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Lincoln Inaugural Artifacts President Abraham Lincoln was first inaugurated in 1861. He served as president through the American Civil War. His second inauguration in 1865 was shortly before the end of the conflict. Explore Abraham Lincoln's first and second presidential inaugurations through artifacts from the Ford's Theatre National Historic Site museum collection. A brick building stands on a city street on a sunny day. Lincoln's Second Inauguration Enshrined on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial and regarded as one of his two greatest speeches, Lincoln's Second Inaugural remains the benchmark for incoming and reelected presidents. More than elucidating why the Civil War was fought, the speech offers a promising potential vision of a newly changed nation. This message of reconciliation created an indelible link with Lincoln’s first inauguration, as the two inaugural speeches bookended a momentous and poignant presidency. Crowd on the East Front of the US Capitol Andrew Johnson's Inauguration Andrew Johnson Inauguration Group of men in a room inaugurating Andrew Johnson Lincoln's First Inauguration Lincoln's First Inauguration in 1861. With more than half of the southern states already seceded, Lincoln sought to calm a nation on the precipice of unprecedented conflict at his first inauguration. Though the beginning of the Civil War erupted within a month of Lincoln’s March 1861 inauguration, the words uttered by the new president demonstrated a faith in the qualities that united Americans and a hope for a spirit of reconciliation. Lincoln sitting beardless with arms crossed. Tina Short and Kym Elder: "The Story of People that Look Like Me" For Tina Short and Kym Elder, African American history is personal. The mother and daughter have expanded the stories the NPS tells while serving their home community. This article was developed from oral history interviews in which they discuss their careers in DC area parks. The interviews contribute to "Telling Our Untold Stories: Civil Rights in the National Park Service Oral History Project" and "Women’s Voices: Women in the National Park Service Oral History Project." Two NPS park rangers in uniform, both African American women, stand in front of a double door Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting the National Mall Memorial Day weekend usually marks the beginning of the summer travel season. Across the country, friends, families, and individuals will head out to enjoy adventures and make memories. Of course, national parks - including the National Mall - are popular destinations. To help you #PlanLikeAParkRanger, we're offering our Top 10 tips to help you on your next National Mall visit. Text reading John Logan: War Hero, Public Servant, Founder of Memorial Day It is fitting and proper that General John Logan should be honored with a prominent statue in the nation's capital. He was an effective military leader who fought in many Civil War battles, a successful and active politician, head of the Grand Army of the Republic veterans organization, and is credited with establishing Memorial Day as a national day of remembrance for those who lost their lives in the Civil War. Equestrian Statue Honoring General John A. Logan at Logan Circle in Washington DC "With Malice Toward None...": Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address In his Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865, a re-elected President Abraham Lincoln wanted to unify a broken nation. With the end of the Civil War within sight, many people on both sides felt anger and frustration toward their fellow Americans. Lincoln attempted to rise above the divisiveness and start the process of healing. Heralded as one of the most significant presidential speeches in American history, its meaning and eloquence still resonate with people today. Lincoln Second Inaugural on the steps of the US Capitol Lincoln in the Illinois State Legislature Abraham Lincoln spent more years as an Illinois state representative than his entire time as U.S. congressman and U.S. president combined. His service in the state legislature was marked by both triumph and failure, and instilled in Lincoln the need to govern while balancing political idealism with political reality. Portrait Photo of Abraham Lincoln ca. 1853 Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background.

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