"Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site" by NPS / Victoria Stauffenberg , public domain

Fort Union Trading Post

National Historic Site - MT,ND

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site is a partial reconstruction of the most important fur trading post on the upper Missouri, 1829-1867. The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota. The historic site interprets how portions of the fort may have looked in 1851, based on archaeological excavations as well as drawings by contemporaries, including Rudolf Kurz, the post clerk in 1851.

maps

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.Montana State - Montana Highway Map

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/fous/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Union_Trading_Post_National_Historic_Site Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site is a partial reconstruction of the most important fur trading post on the upper Missouri, 1829-1867. The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota. The historic site interprets how portions of the fort may have looked in 1851, based on archaeological excavations as well as drawings by contemporaries, including Rudolf Kurz, the post clerk in 1851. Between 1828 and 1867, Fort Union was the most important fur trade post on the Upper Missouri River. Here, the Assiniboine and six other Northern Plains Tribes exchanged buffalo robes and smaller furs for goods from around the world, including cloth, guns, blankets, and beads. A bastion of peaceful coexistence, the post annually traded over 25,000 buffalo robes and $100,000 in merchandise. Located on North Dakota Highway 1804 right at the Montana and North Dakota state line. From Williston, ND, approximately 25 miles to the southwest via ND Highways 2 & 1804. From Sidney, MT, approximately 25 miles to the northeast, via MT Highways 200 & 58. Commercial flights and rental cars are available in both Williston, ND and Sidney, MT. Amtrak passenger train service and rental cars are available in Williston, ND. Bourgeois House Visitor Center Located in the center of the fort's courtyard is the Bourgeois House Visitor Center. The reconstructed building documents Fort Union's life and history through exhibits and park videos. The exhibits include artifacts recovered during the extensive archaeological excavations. The information gained in these excavations made the fort's reconstruction possible. This fully accessible building includes a ranger-staffed information desk, brochures and Jr. Ranger program. Located on North Dakota Highway 1804 right on the Montana and North Dakota state line. From Williston, ND, approximately 25 miles to the southwest via ND Highways 2 & 1804. From Sidney, MT, approximately 25 miles to the northeast, via MT Highway 200 & ND Highway 58. River View of Fort Union View from Missouri River bottoms of Southwest bastion Viewing Fort Union Trading Post from the Missouri River bottoms one can imagine how grandiose the site would appear to weary steamboat travelers. Twilight View of the Bourgeois House Candles illuminate the Bourgeois House porch at dusk Volunteer reenactors relax on the Bourgeois House porch Fort Union Trading Post Courtyard Courtyard of Fort Union Trading Post with Bourgeois House, Tipis and US Flag Ranging from employee housing, workshops, storage warehouses, domestic animal pens and horse corrals, the courtyard housed the world at Fort Union. Fort Union and the Missouri River Valley View of Fort Union and the Missouri River looking south Visitors hiking the scenic Bodmer Trail experience a historical view of Fort Union, and the same view painted by Karl Bodmer in 1833. Natawista Iksina (Medicine Snake Woman) A Powerful Woman, Then and Now. Natawista, or Medicine Snake Woman, was around 15 when Alexander Culbertson, then about 30, proposed marriage to her family. The story is legendary, the consequences impact the the trade at Both Fort Union and Fort Benton, the northern intercontinental railroad survey expedition, Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 and John James Audubon's time at Fort Union, among other events! Women seated with black dress, pinned white collar with cameo, wearing a cross necklace. Bear Skins in the Fur Trade The fur trade shaped American history, largely financing the exploration and settlement of much of the West. Village during the fur trade era Plant Community Monitoring at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site As the landscape surounding Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site underwent a transformation from a frontier to an agricultural environment in recent history, it led to the reduction and extirpation of native plant species, followed by the introduction or invasion of exotics. Plant community monitoring has been conducted at the park since 2011, and is critical for understanding the current health of ecosystems and providing feedback on management activities. close up of a grass that has tiny oval seads on lots of delicate stalks Fort Union Trading Post (ND) In late April 1805 the Corps of Discovery set up camp near present-day Fort Union, near the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri rivers. This area was also home to animals never before seen by an American citizens - the bighorn (Rocky Mountain) sheep, and the “white bear.” On April 14 Clark saw his first "white bear," a creature so dreaded that American Indians would only hunt them in groups of eight to 10 men. teepees outside of fort union trading post Bat Projects in Parks: Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Across six Northern Great Plains parks, education and outreach for bats was conducted. View of Badlands National Parks unique rock formations in the distance Bat Acoustic Monitoring at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site The Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors bats to detect long-term trends in bat poulations at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site. Acoustic recorders detect the unique ultrasonic calls bats use for echolocation. Monitoring helps protect the bat communities that live and forage in the park. A gloved hand gently holds a bat with one wing outstretched NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, North Dakota and Montana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] cart with visitor center in background 19th Century Archeology at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site The fur trading post Fort Union was established in 1828 by the American Fur Company. Located at the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers in North Dakota, the trading post was used from 1823 to 1867. The post became a National Historic Site in 1966. bulls battling with men and horses painting North Dakota: Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site Strategically located near the homelands of 10 Northern Plains tribes, Fort Union was the most important trading post of the Upper Missouri fur trade until smallpox decimated the population of numerous Plains tribes. After resentment toward the white encroachment into Indian Territory led to Sioux hostilities, the need for trading posts declined as the call for military posts increased. Fort Union Trading Post 19th Century Archeology at the Garden Coulee Site The Garden Coulee site, located on the grounds of Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, represents an historic Hidasta occupation that occurred during the 1870's -1880's after the trading post was abandoned in 1864. Even though this site is not associated with Ft. Union, it contributes to our understanding of peoples, land use and politics in the northern plains during the turbulent 1870's. Crow-Flies-High Fort Union's Trade House Trade with the Assiniboine and other Northern Plains Tribes was the core of the American Fur Company's success, enabling Fort Union Trading Post to become the longest lasting Fur Trading post in the US. Learn here how those trades took place in the fort's most rustic building. Two seated men discuss trade. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Plant Community Monitoring in Northern Great Plains Network Parks Plant communities are essential components of all major ecosystems. Plants are the ultimate source of food for other organisms and the main source of organic material in soil and water. They also influence climate and provide the scenery that park visitors enjoy. The NPS Northern Great Plains Network monitors the number, identity, and relative abundance of plant species, as well as their horizontal cover and vertical structure, to determine the health of park ecosystems. Two people sitting on the ground looking at plants

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