"Fort Vancouver" by National Park Service , public domain

Fort Vancouver

National Historic Site - OR, WA

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site is located in the states of Washington and Oregon. The National Historic Site consists of two units, one located on the site of Fort Vancouver in modern-day Vancouver, Washington; the other being the former residence of John McLoughlin in Oregon City, Oregon. The two sites were separately given national historic designation in the 1940s. The Fort Vancouver unit was designated a National Historic Site in 1961, and was combined with the McLoughlin House into a unit in 2003.

maps

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/fova/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Vancouver_National_Historic_Site Fort Vancouver National Historic Site is located in the states of Washington and Oregon. The National Historic Site consists of two units, one located on the site of Fort Vancouver in modern-day Vancouver, Washington; the other being the former residence of John McLoughlin in Oregon City, Oregon. The two sites were separately given national historic designation in the 1940s. The Fort Vancouver unit was designated a National Historic Site in 1961, and was combined with the McLoughlin House into a unit in 2003. Located on the north bank of the Columbia River, in sight of snowy mountain peaks and a vibrant urban landscape, this park has a rich cultural past. From a frontier fur trading post, to a powerful military legacy, the magic of flight, and the origin of the American Pacific Northwest, history is shared at four unique sites. Discover stories of transition, settlement, conflict, and community. From I-5, take the Mill Plain Boulevard exit (Exit 1-C) and head east. Turn south onto Fort Vancouver Way. At the traffic circle, go east on Evergreen Boulevard and follow signs to the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center. From I-205, go west on Highway 14 about six miles, then take I-5 north. From I-5, take the Mill Plain Boulevard exit (Exit 1-C) and head east. At the traffic circle, go east on Evergreen Boulevard and follow signs to the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center. Fort Vancouver Visitor Center Begin your visit by learning about all the park's venues through new exhibits and activities. Watch a short film about the site's history, peruse the park's bookstore, and enjoy a display of artwork by American Indian artists. The Visitor Center is shared with Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Forest rangers can sell passes and permits and provide information related to the forest. From I-5, take the Mill Plain Boulevard exit (Exit 1-C) and head east. Turn south onto Fort Vancouver Way. At the traffic circle, go east on Evergreen Boulevard and follow signs to the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center. From I-205, go west on Highway 14 about six miles, then take I-5 north. From I-5, take the Mill Plain Boulevard exit (Exit 1-C) and head east. Turn south onto Fort Vancouver Way. At the traffic circle, go east on Evergreen Boulevard and follow signs to the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center (150 Fort Vancouver Garden Fort Vancouver Garden The garden at the reconstructed Fort Vancouver showcases the many plants that were grown at the historic Fort Vancouver. Black Powder Demonstrations at Fort Vancouver NHS Black Powder Demonstrations at Fort Vancouver NHS The military history at Vancouver Barracks is told through living history demonstrations, including historic weapons demonstrations. Fort Vancouver Fort Vancouver A walk through the reconstructed Fort Vancouver is a highlight of any trip to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. McLoughlin House McLoughlin House The McLoughlin House in Oregon City is a unit of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Here, visitors learn about Dr. John McLoughlin and the early history of Oregon state. Pearson Air Museum Pearson Air Museum At Pearson Air Museum, visitors learn about the history of Pearson Field and early aviation in the Pacific Northwest. Women of Fort Vancouver Discover the stories of the women who lived at the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver. Painting of Fort Vancouver with wood structures and trees, 1820s-1850s. NPS photo. Kids of Fort Vancouver: James Sangster James Sangster worked as a "ship's boy" on board a brigantine that traveled from London to Vancouver. A boy wearing a blue and white striped shirt. Kids of Fort Vancouver: George Stewart Simpson George Stewart Simpson was the son of one of the most powerful men of the North American fur trade, but that didn't mean his life was easy! George grew up - and worked - at Fort Vancouver. A boy inside the Fur Store at Fort Vancouver holding a fur. Kids of Fort Vancouver: Thomas Como & Alexander Lattie Thomas Como and Alexander Lattie both grew up at Fort Vancouver and became apprentices there. A boy wearing a straw hat and a striped shirt. Kids of Fort Vancouver: Eloisa McLoughlin & Cecilia Douglas Learn about Eloisa McLoughlin and Cecilia Douglas, two girls who grew up in the Chief Factor's House at Fort Vancouver! A girl wearing 1800s clothing smiles at the camera. Kids of Fort Vancouver: Harriet Pambrun Harriet Pambrun grew up at Fort Vancouver, and later lived in Oregon City, Oregon. Three girls wearing 1840s-style clothing sit on a blanket doing needlework. Women in Archaeology at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Since the 1940s, women have been an important part of archaeology and cultural resources at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Learn more about their impressive contributions to our knowledge of this special place! A woman wearing a National Park Service uniform stands in an archaeological excavation unit. Languages at Fort Vancouver Fort Vancouver and it's employee Village was home to a diverse community. Learn about the many languages spoken by the people who lived here in the 1800s. Men, women, and children stand or sit in front of a wooden house in the Fort Vancouver Village. The Fort Vancouver Community The Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver was home to a diverse community that included individuals from many different American Indian tribes. Photo of Fort Vancouver with Mount Hood in the background The Fort Vancouver Village The Fort Vancouver Village was one of the largest settlements in the West during its time, and was home to a multi-ethnic, multicultural population of Hudson's Bay Company employees and their families. Two small cabins sit in a grassy field. Artist Louis Grell and the Vancouver Spruce Mill In late 1918, noted artist Louis Grell arrived at Vancouver Barracks' Spruce Mill as a soldier of the Spruce Production Division. As World War I came to a close, Grell provided illustrations for the Spruce Mill's official newspaper, the "Straight Grain." Read more about his experience at Vancouver Barracks and see a gallery of the illustrations and cartoons he drew here. Photo of two men in US Army uniforms, circa World War I Private Albert Cooper and the 318th Engineers at Vancouver Barracks In April 1918, Private Albert F. Cooper joined the 318th Engineers and trained at Vancouver Barracks. Just over a month later, he arrived in France and entered the first World War. Photo of Private Albert F. Cooper in uniform Curling on the Columbia River On January 26, 1847, the first curling game in the Northwest was played on the frozen Columbia River between officers of the Royal Navy ship HMS Modeste and employees of the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver. Watercolor of ship frozen into icy river with people playing on the ice. Cosmetic and Hygiene Bottles in the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Museum Collection Cosmetic and hygiene bottles found by archaeologists at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site provide a unique window into 19th century daily life. Glass bottle with raised lettering 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor Buffalo Soldiers at Vancouver Barracks From 1899 to 1900, "Buffalo Soldiers" from Company B of the 24th U.S. Infantry Regiment were stationed at Vancouver Barracks. This marked the first time in the history of the post that a unit from one of the Army's four African American regiments comprised the post's regular garrison of troops. Portrait of Sergeant Edward Gibson The Civil War Era at Fort Vancouver Though it was not on the front lines of the Civil War, Fort Vancouver (later called Vancouver Barracks) was home to Union soldiers and their families. Photo of troops and horses at Vancouver Barracks First Flight Around the World: The Douglas World Cruisers at Pearson Field In 1924, two Douglas World Cruisers landed at the Vancouver Barracks Aerodrome (today's Pearson Field) at the start and end of their groundbreaking journey around the world. Black and white photo of biplane The Marshall House: Victorian Jewel of Officers Row The Marshall House on Officers' Row at Vancouver Barracks has a long and storied history. Photo of Marshall House Reconstructing a Flagstaff on the Historic Vancouver Barracks Parade Ground In 2017, the Vancouver Barracks flagstaff was reconstructed in the site where it stood from 1854 to 1879. The project was a culmination of two years of archaeological excavations and was made possible through the support of the national park's community. Painting of Vancouver Barracks flagstaff Strong Forests, Stronger Communities: The Civilian Conservation Corps in the Northwest In the 1930s, Vancouver Barrack served as the regional headquarters for the Civilian Conservation Corps, an important program launched to provide relief for those affected by the Great Depression. Photo of young men in uniform. Historic Vancouver Barracks Building 987 Undergoes Rehabilitation In late 2016, over a year of construction on historic Vancouver Barracks Building 987, part of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, came to an end. This project successfully restored a century-old barracks building, and allowed for its adaptive reuse as the headquarters of Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Photo of front porch of Vancouver Barracks Building 987 President Pipes at Vancouver Barracks 19th century "president" pipes, which were used as campaign tools, have been found archaeologically at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, and were likely owned by soldiers or officers stationed at Vancouver Barracks. Tobacco pipe bowl with image of President Millard Fillmore Vancouver During World War II During World War II, the town of Vancouver, Washington, experienced a degree of economic growth unparalleled in its history. Photograph of ship launching at Kaiser Shipyards Marbles at Fort Vancouver Marbles found by archaeologists at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site provide a window into the past, revealing one type of game played by the people who lived here. Photo of white marble with green swirl design. Stemware at Fort Vancouver At the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver, stemware was both functional and an important symbol of Victorian ideals for table manners. Photo of a small wine glass. The Francis E. Ulmer Collection at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Francis Edgar Ulmer served in the U.S. Army from 1911 through the 1920s, and had deep ties to Vancouver Barracks. Artifacts donated by his descendants to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site's museum collection help tell his story. Black and white photo of group of seated men in dark-colored military uniforms. Mid-Nineteenth Century Celestial Observations at Vancouver Barracks In the 19th century, post surgeons at Vancouver Barracks were assigned with recording meteorological events, and observed and recorded several comets over the Army post. Historic print of a comet streaking through the night sky Sarah Winnemucca at Vancouver Barracks In 1881, author and activist Sarah Winnemucca advocated for American Indian prisoners incarcerated at Vancouver Barracks. Photo of Sarah Winnemucca Ceramic Analysis at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Archaeological analysis of ceramic artifacts at Fort Vancouver has revealed fascinating insights about the residents of the Hudson's Bay Company fort. Archaeological Spode ceramics in a drawer The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: U.S. Army and World War II, 1941-1947 During World War II, Vancouver became the site of the Kaiser Shipyards, an enormous complex that constructed ships for the war effort. The shipyards brought with them new jobs and the creation of new resources for its employees. Black and white photo of ship launching at Kaiser Shipyard. The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: U.S. Army and World War I, 1917-1918 From 1917 to 1918, Vancouver Barracks became the site of the world's largest Spruce Cut-Up Mill, designed to support the efforts of the Spruce Production Division. During World War I, this massive regional operation provided much-needed lumber for Allied aircraft manufacture. Photo of soldiers inside a mill. The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: U.S. Army, 1861-1916 In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, soldiers from the U.S. Army's Vancouver Barracks served in conflicts throughout the American West and overseas. During this period, the post itself underwent dramatic changes that transformed it into one of the most desirable duty stations in the region. Black and white photo of fields and Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s. The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: National Park Service, 1948-1996 Today's Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in Vancouver, Washington, and Oregon City, Oregon, tells the story of the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver, the U.S. Army at Vancouver Barracks, early aviation at Pearson Field, and the history of the McLoughlin Family in Oregon City. Photo of two small cabins with Fort Vancouver and Mount Hood in the background. The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: Indian Country, pre-1824 Native Americans interacted with the Columbia River landscape occupied by the current Vancouver National Historic Reserve for thousands of years prior to 1824 when Governor George Simpson chose Jolie Prairie as the location for a new Hudson's Bay Company post. Painting of thatched structure with mountain and river in background. The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: Hudson's Bay Company, 1824-1846 Founded in 1825, Fort Vancouver became the Hudson's Bay Company Columbia Department's main supply post and administrative headquarters and the center of all HBC activities west of the Rockies, including international trade. Over the two decades, the HBC managed a fur trade business, and a massive agricultural and industrial operation. Sketch of houses and fort in background. The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: Fort Vancouver and Vancouver Barracks, 1847-1860 From 1847 to 1860, the construction of the US Army's Vancouver Barracks alongside the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver brought about tremendous changes to the landscape. Lithograph showing Fort Vancouver on lower plain and military buildings and cannons on upper hill. Alexander Pearson: An Early Pilot of Aviation History Lt. Alexander Pearson was a trailblazing pilot of early aviation. His groundbreaking flights, including the first aerial survey of the Grand Canyon and breaking the world speed record in 1923, made him one of the United States' most celebrated early aviators. Today, Pearson Field and Pearson Air Museum, a part of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, are named after him. Black and white photo of man in military uniform. Louis Lee: Kaiser Shipyards Photographer During World War II, Louis Lee served as the staff photographer of the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company's shipyards in Vancouver, Washington. His photographs provide a unique, informative, and artistic window into life at the shipyards. Chinese American man holding camera in front of ship. How Much Did a Beaver Hat Cost? For two and a half centuries, beaver hats were a driving force behind the international fur trade. But who bought these hats, and why? How much did they cost? What did they say about their owners? Learn about the fascinating history behind the hats in this article written by Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Research Volunteer Tom Holloway. A man wears an 1840s gentleman's suit and a beaver hat. Fort Vancouver as a Base for Missionary Efforts In the early and mid 19th century, the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver served as a hub for Protestant and Catholic missionaries in the Pacific Northwest. Image of wooden beads and oxidized metal charms that once formed a rosary. Hawaiian Presence at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Fort Vancouver, as the colonial “Capital” of the Pacific Northwest in the 1820s-1840s, supported a multi-ethnic village of 600-1,000 occupants. A number of the villagers were Hawaiian men who worked in the agricultural fields and sawmills of the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) operations. Identification of Hawaiian residences and activities has been an important element of studies of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Reconstruction at Fort Vancouver Bees of the North Coast & Cascades Bees are some of the most abundant and important pollinators in the world – especially in mountainous environments. Despite the importance of bees in our natural environments, many national parks do not know what species live within their boundaries. In 2016, to celebrate the Centennial of the National Park Service, North Coast and Cascades national parks focused on inventories of pollinators, including bees. Macro photo of the metallic blue head of a mason bee The Spruce Production Division From 1917 to 1918, the nationalization of the lumber industry in the Pacific Northwest led to the creation of the Spruce Production Division. This massive war effort employed tens of thousands of soldiers and produced millions of board feet of lumber for the manufacture of airplanes. Soldiers inside Spruce Mill Every Kid in a Park Grants Bring Students to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Did you know that in 2018 the National Park Foundation is celebrating its 50th birthday? The NPF has supported parks across the nation in countless ways through their support of partnership, philanthropy, and volunteering... including Fort Vancouver National Historic Site! Photo of group of students posing by the entrance sign to Fort Vancouver. The French Connection: The McLoughlins in Paris The McLoughlin family, famous for its connection to the fur trade at Fort Vancouver, had many ties to France and, specifically, to Paris. Portrait of white-haired man wearing suit "The National Game is Decidedly 'On the Fly'": The Rise of Organized Base Ball in the Portland and Vancouver Area in 1867 In 1867, the U.S. Army's Sherman Base Ball Club and the City of Vancouver's Occidental Base Ball Club were part of a rising tide of public interest in the new sport of "base ball." Today, games between these base ball clubs are recreated annually at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Photo of 1860s-style balls and bats The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver: U.S. Army and Civilian Conservation Corps, 1919-1941 Between World Wars I and II, Vancouver Barracks was the location of the regional headquarters for the Civilian Conservation Corps and was the site of an airfield in the early days of aviation. Black and white photo of CCC enrollees at Vancouver Barracks. The Unique Role of Iroquois and Cree Employees at Fort Vancouver The Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver was home to many employees of Cree and Iroquois descent. Paper with pencil sketch showing Fort Vancouver Village Historical Photographs in the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Museum Collection The Fort Vancouver National Historic Site museum collection includes daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, and ivorytypes. Learn more about these early photographic methods and see historic photos from the park's collection. Daguerreotype photograph of white-haired man in case with velvet lining The War and Westward Expansion With Federal resources focused on waging the war farther east, both native tribes and the Confederacy attempted to claim or reclaim lands west of the Mississippi. The Federal government responded with measures (Homestead Act, transcontinental railroad) and military campaigns designed to encourage settlement, solidify Union control of the trans-Mississippi West, and further marginalize the physical and cultural presence of tribes native to the West. Painting Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way showing settlers moving into the American west "She is Particularly Useful to Her Husband": Strategic Marriages Between Hudson's Bay Company Employees and Native Women at Fort Vancouver The great majority of women at Fort Vancouver in the first half of the 19th century were American Indian. These women were vital parts of the fort's community, as well as important players in the political and economic landscape of the fur trade. Photograph of costumed interpreters inthe Fort Vancouver Village A Slave Freed at Fort Vancouver: The Manumission of Monimia Travers In 1851, Monimia Travers, a woman kept in slavery by a U.S. Army captain, was freed at Vancouver Barracks. Archival records, pieced together, reveal fragments of her story. Image from US Census showing Monimia Travers in 1851 Hawaiians at Fort Vancouver At the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver, Hawaiians accounted for a large portion of the fort's workforce and community. Hawaiian coral excavated from Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Private Ormond Bobo and the 7th Infantry at Vancouver Barracks Private Ormond Bobo of the 7th Infantry was stationed at Vancouver Barracks in the late 1930s. Learn about his military experience in Vancouver and view artifacts donated to the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site museum collection. Photo of man in green military dress uniform and hat. Marguerite McLoughlin's Sewing Tools Marguerite McLoughlin was a significant figure in the history of Fort Vancouver and was also an accomplished seamstress. Take a look inside the Fort Vancouver National Historic museum collection to see beautiful examples of 19th century sewing tools owned by Mrs. McLoughlin. Photo of a spool of white thread on a decorated holder and an almond-shaped tatting shuttle. School at Fort Vancouver Fort Vancouver was home to a school for boys and girls that taught both traditional school subjects, and trained young people for work as adults. Drawing of a wooden rectangular building. Lieutenant Noel B. Evans and the 321st Observation Squadron at Pearson Field From 1925 to 1932, Lieutenant Noel B. Evans served with the 321st Observation Squadron at Pearson Field. Black and white photo of pilots posing in front of a biplane aircraft in 1926. The Grant House: First Army Headquarters in the Northwest Built in 1849, the Grant House on Vancouver Barracks' Officers' Row initially served as the post's Headquarters and Commanding Officer's residence. Today, the historic house is directly adjacent to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, managed by the City of Vancouver, and home to a modern restaurant. Modern photo of the Grant House The DH-4 Liberty Plane at War and in Peace The DH-4 Liberty plane, manufactured from Sitka spruce logged from the forests of the Pacific Northwest, played a significant role both in battle and after the war. Historic photo of DH-4 Liberty plane Slipware at Fort Vancouver From the late 18th to the early 20th century, “slipware” served as inexpensive, utilitarian household goods, mostly jugs, mugs, and bowls. Archaeologists at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site have found remnants of slipware ceramics that were once used by the fort's residents. Photo of mochaware chamber pot with yellow borders and blue mochaware design around middle. Social Aspects of Pipe Smoking at Fort Vancouver At the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver, tobacco pipe smoking was an important aspect of trade and daily life. Archaeologists at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site have found numerous fragments of the pipes used here, and have uncovered patterns and stories about the historic role played by pipe smoking. Photo of white clay tobacco pipe fragments "A General Time of Indulgence and Festivity": Early Winter Holiday Celebrations at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site At Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company's fur trading outpost in the Pacific Northwest, Christmas and New Year's Day were a time to celebrate and enjoy a break from the rigors of daily life. Photo of candle in lantern surrounded by greenery A Red Bolt from the Blue: Valery Chkalov and the World's First Transpolar Flight In June 1937, the world's first transpolar flight flew from Moscow, Russia, over the North Pole, and landed at Pearson Field at Vancouver, Washington. Discover the fascinating story of this historic achievement in aviation history. Photo of airplane with Russian writing on side Frederick and Emma Calhoun at Vancouver Barracks Historic ledgers kept by Lt. Frederick and Emma Calhoun are now preserved in the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site museum collection. Together, the ledgers offer a window into life at 19th century Vancouver Barracks. Photograph of Emma Calhoun's accounts ledger Asian American History at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Discover the stories of Asian American men and women from the history of Fort Vancouver and Vancouver Barracks. Black and white photo of a Chinese American woman wearing a pilot's helmet and goggles. The JN-4 Jenny: The Plane that Taught America to Fly The Curtiss JN-4 Jenny is synonymous with the “barn storming” era of aviation, and is truly the airplane that taught American pilots of the 1916-1925 era how to fly. This training airplane, designed by a team working for the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company in 1914-1915, was built in the thousands in during World War I to train US servicemen how to fly. Black and white photo of men in military uniforms posing in front of a JN-4 aircraft. Requiem for the 1820s Fort Vancouver Apple Tree, and a New Dawn The venerable “Old Apple Tree” of Fort Vancouver, Washington has died. The nearly 200-year-old tree, which succumbed to mortality on June 25, 2020, was a local landmark and the oldest living feature associated with Fort Vancouver. The NPS and the City of Vancouver partnered with the National Clonal Germplasm Repository to clone the tree. The clone trees were propagated from rooted cuttings and planted out within a reconstructed HBC orchard. A person takes a picture of a leafy apple tree, protected by a fence and shadowed by an overpass 1997–1998 El Niño / 1998–1999 La Niña Wind-driven waves and abnormally high sea levels contributed to hundreds of millions of dollars in flood and storm damage in the San Francisco Bay region, including Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. In addition to California, the 1997–1998 El Niño and the following 1998–1999 La Niña severely impacted the Pacific Northwest, including many National Park System units. colorful ocean surface mapping image Bead Types at Fort Vancouver The Fort Vancouver National Historic Site museum collection contains over 120,000 glass beads! Discover the history behind these colorful archaeological artifacts, and the manufacturing methods used by 19th century bead makers. Three blue faceted beads against a black background. Experience Fort Vancouver National Historic Site From Home! Can't come to Fort Vancouver right now? No problem! Learn about fun activities you can do at home to learn about the history of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site! Photo of an open door on the Fur Store at Fort Vancouver. Museum Collection Curation at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site At Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Curators Theresa Langford and Meagan Huff care for a museum collection of nearly two million artifacts. Curator wearing blue gloves holds a saucer found during archaeological excavations at Fort Vancouver Black History at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Discover the stories of Black men and women from the history of Fort Vancouver and Vancouver Barracks. Black and white photo of an African American man wearing a military uniform. The Transfer Printing Process for Ceramics How did ceramics manufacturers make the beautifully decorated Spode dishes frequently found at Hudson's Bay Company sites, including Fort Vancouver? See step-by-step images from the process, and learn about the artistry behind the fort's dinner plates and teacups! A small plate with a blue printed rural scene. YMCA Service Clubs at Vancouver Barracks During World War I During World War I, three YMCA locations at Vancouver Barracks provided soldiers with places for relaxation, recreation, and personal enrichment. Learn about the activities that soldiers enjoyed at this historic military post. Black and white photo of a wooden YMCA building with soldiers and civilian standing in front. Transfer Print Ceramics at Fort Vancouver Archaeologists working at Fort Vancouver often find fragments of beautifully decorated ceramics made by the Spode Company. Learn more about these decorative and functional items! White teacup decorated with a floral blue pattern. Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Sauvie Island and the Hudson's Bay Company Sauvie Island, located at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, is the largest island along the Columbia River, and about eight miles from Fort Vancouver. Before the fort’s establishment in 1825, the island was home to a large Indigenous population. This community was decimated by disease outbreaks in the early 1830s, and the island entered a new colonial phase – passing from American to British, and back to American, control. Image of an 1841 map showing the location of Sauvie Island. The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Fort Vancouver Barracks After December of 1941, Vancouver Barracks came under the control of the Ninth Service Command, with headquarters at Fort Douglas Utah. The post then served as a staging area for the Portland Subport of embarkation, and as a training center for certain units; in January of 1943, the army's first training center for quartermaster units began at Vancouver Barracks. image of Vancouver Barracks during World War II Bat Projects in Parks: North Coast Cascades Network Eleven bat species occur in North Coast Cascades Network Parks. Each species is unique, except that they're all facing threats of some kind in their environments. Learn more about how scientists study bats and what you can do to help. Tree of Peace Traditional Mohawk Chief Jake Swamp created the Tree of Peace Society in 1982 to commemorate the Great Law of Peace. His organization planted White Pines all over the country. On April 29, 1988, the Iroquois returned to Philadelphia to plant a White Pine by the First Bank of the United States. White Pine tree with night watch box in background. A small fence with other trees can be seen. Veteran Story: Scott Irvine Park Ranger and U.S. Army veteran Scott Irvine started working at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site as a seasonal park guide during the summer of 2016, but his connection to the park goes back much further than that. Bust-length photo of Park Ranger Scott Irvine wearing the National Park Service Uniform Park After Dark In this special video series, our wonderful volunteers offer a lighthearted look at the Kitchen, Counting House, Chief Factor's House, and Fur Store. There is also a bonus daytime video of the Fort Vancouver garden! A candle lantern sitting on a hearth. Christmas Crafts From Fort Vancouver Learn how to make your own Victorian-style holiday decorations, like the residents of Fort Vancouver! Pomanders in the Fort Vancouver Kitchen. A "Taste" of Fort Vancouver As many of us stay home to help slow the spread of COVID-19, we find ourselves cooking at home more often. Learn about the history of dining and food at Fort Vancouver, and try your hand at historically-inspired recipes developed by Volunteer-in-Parks Bob Prinz, who demonstrates historic cooking techniques in the Kitchen at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Potatoes, onions, and other ingredients sit in baskets and bowls on a table. Build a Beaver Dam Learn about beaver dams and build your own beaver dam at home in this hands-on activity for kids! Photo of two beavers in the water. Christmas Treats From Fort Vancouver Enjoy these delicious Christmas-themed food and drink recipes inspired by the history of Fort Vancouver! Photo of hot buttered rum in a teacup with a saucer and cinnamon sticks. Fort Vancouver Cultural Landscape The Fort Vancouver cultural landscape is a component landscape within Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Located along the Columbia River, the landscape is associated with the Hudson's Bay Company's occupation and activities in the area. The fort landscape is a reconstruction based largely on archeological resources, suggestive of the historic era between 1824 and 1860. A wooden well sweep extends into the air beside a white house built into the stockade wall. Park Headquarters Cultural Landscape The Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Park Headquarters landscape was developed as part of the NPS Mission 66 movement. The period of significance, 1954-1966, includes the years of design and development during the Mission 66 era. The site is notable for its distinct Modern style architecture and site design, and for its association with park master planning during that period. A flag in a lawn, bordered by a neat, curving hedge beside a low building Barracks and Parade Grounds Cultural Landscape The East Barracks/Parade Ground is an approximately 38 acre designed historic landscape central to the Vancouver Barracks developed by the U.S. Army between 1849 and 1947. This landscape includes the Parade Ground and the East Barracks and was listed on the National Register in 2007 as part of the Vancouver National Historic Reserve Historic District. barracks and parade ground Series: The Treaties of Fort Stanwix The history of Fort Stanwix, from first contact through the end of the fort's useful military life, symbolizes the broader contest of nations (European, United States and American Indian) for economic and political control of the Oneida Carrying Place, the Mohawk Valley, the homelands of the Six Nation Confederacy, and the rich resources of North America. The following web pages focus on treaties and land transactions negotiated and concluded at Fort Stanwix. An old parchment paper document. In the top margin Series: The Military History of Fort Schuyler Although the fort is most famous for it's role in the Siege of 1777, numerous other battles and events happened near and in conjunction with the soldiers of Fort Schuyler. A group of Continental Soldiers stand saluting underneath the American flag. Series: Kids at Fort Vancouver Learn about kids who lived and worked at the fort! A girl wearing an 1840s-style dress smiles at the camera. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Coastal Geomorphology—Storms of Record Storms can bring about significant coastal change as well as substantial economic damage and loss in the human environment. Read about a few storms of interest that have since made history due to their unique intensity, characteristics, or impacts. aerial view of a major storm along the northwest coast of the united states and canada Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Series: The Cultural Landscape of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Excerpted from the 2005 Cultural Landscape Report for Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, this series of articles describes the changes to and significance of the landscape at this northwest national park. Lithograph showing Fort Vancouver on a lower plain with military buildings on hill to the north. Overlanders in the Columbia River Gorge, 1840-1870: A Narrative History Most who followed the Oregon Trail did not traverse the Columbia River Gorge, if they could help it, because the gorge posed numerous dangers for travelers unfamiliar with the rugged terrain and raging river. When Samuel Barlow opened a road around the southern side of Mount Hood in 1846, overlanders going to Oregon City more often chose that route, rather than braving the Columbia River. Looking into a deep, steep-walled rocky canyon with a large river below. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Washington and Oregon Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] reconstructed log stockade and surrounding landscape Data Manager Profile: Kristen Bonebrake Meet Kristen Bonebrake, Data Manager for the North Coast and Cascades Network Inventory & Monitoring Network, and discover the important role that data managers play in protecting the natural resources of our parks! Explore Kristen's journey—from counting roadkill as an intern at Saguaro National Park, to collaborating with bright minds around the country to solve the complex challenges facing our nation's most special places. Kristen kneels on a rock in front of a dramatic snow-capped mountain scene. First Archaeological Investigations of Fort Astoria While the site of Fort Astoria in Oregon has been listed as a National Historic Landmark (NHL) since the 1960s, archaeologists had never performed methodical excavations at the site. In 2020, the regional NHL program published a report from an archaeology field school that detailed three archaeological sites associated with the NHL. This work greatly expanded our understanding of the fur trade and its aftermath at the mouth of the Columbia River. Two people digging and sifting through soil in search of artifacts. Dr. McLoughlin's Garden At Fort Vancouver in present-day Washington State, the garden founded by the fort's Chief Factor Dr. John McLoughlin provided food, decoration, and a restful oasis for a select few. A volunteer working in the Fort Vancouver Garden. Top 10 Summer Activities at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Summer is the perfect time to visit Fort Vancouver National Historic Site! Check out our top 10 recommendations for things to do and trip ideas at the national park this summer! White flowers blooming in the Fort Vancouver Garden. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Entertaining the Enlisted Men The Vancouver Canteen, created in the 1880s, provided a place for enlisted men to recreate and relax, and gave birth to the US Army's Post Exchange system. Enlisted men sitting inside a room decorated for Christmas. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Chinese Workers In the 1880s, Chinese immigrants worked as servants, cooks, and laundrymen at Vancouver Barracks. Black and white photo of a Chinese man in traditional clothing sitting in a portrait studio. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Timeline Read a timeline of events in the 1880s at Vancouver Barracks. A yellow metal Army helmet insignia of an eagle with a shield. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Incarceration of the Tukudika Vancouver Barracks was a place of incarceration for Native American people imprisoned during the Indian Wars. Learn about the story of the incarceration of the Tukudika, a band of Shoshone who were imprisoned at Vancouver Barracks in 1880. A black and white photo of Tukudika people sitting inside a tent. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Working Women At Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s, women worked as laundresses for the US Army. A black and white photo of a women bending over a laundry basket. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Chief Joseph and General Gibbon In 1889, Nez Perce Chief Joseph and Brigadier General John Gibbon, who first clashed at the Battle of Big Hole in 1877, met again at Vancouver Barracks. A black and white photo of Chief Joseph and John Gibbon sitting in chairs. Vancouver Barracks in the 1880s: Introduction The 1880s were a time of great change at Vancouver Barracks. The events of this decade continue to have an impact on life in the 21st century. A black and white photo of the Vancouver Barracks Arsenal ca. 1880s. The Fort and the Village Archeological and ethnohistoric data reveal a complex colonial milieu tied to the unique multi-cultural nature of the settlement, and tied to indigenous and other non-western communities. The development of a unique Fort Vancouver community tied to British interests led to its demise during the period of American colonial settlement in the 1850s. Officers, Soldiers, and Laundresses An archeological examination of the officers, soldiers, and laundresses at Fort Vancouver. Oldest Apple Tree in the Pacific Northwest Lives On The oldest apple tree in the Pacific Northwest, which died in June 2020, lives on as its offspring shoots are replanted in the Apple Orchard along the Land Bridge Trail at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Small, young apple tree grows among rows of trees, with wooden bastion in the background

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