"View towards Fort Washington" by NPS Photo / NCR CLP 2018 , public domain

Fort Washington

Park - Maryland

Fort Washington, located near the community of Fort Washington, Maryland, was for many decades the only defensive fort protecting Washington D.C. The original fort, overlooking the Potomac River, was completed in 1809, and was begun as Fort Warburton, but renamed in 1808. During the War of 1812, the fort was destroyed by its own garrison during a British advance. The current historic fort—maintained by the National Park Service—was initially constructed in 1824. It is a stone structure with a good cannon shot down the Potomac River. The fort was extensively remodeled in the 1840s and 1890s.

maps

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Piscataway Park in Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Piscataway - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Piscataway Park in Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/fowa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Washington_Park Fort Washington, located near the community of Fort Washington, Maryland, was for many decades the only defensive fort protecting Washington D.C. The original fort, overlooking the Potomac River, was completed in 1809, and was begun as Fort Warburton, but renamed in 1808. During the War of 1812, the fort was destroyed by its own garrison during a British advance. The current historic fort—maintained by the National Park Service—was initially constructed in 1824. It is a stone structure with a good cannon shot down the Potomac River. The fort was extensively remodeled in the 1840s and 1890s. Built to defend the river approach to Washington, DC, Fort Washington has stood as silent sentry for over 200 years. As technologies advanced so did Fort Washington, from the brick and stone of the 19th century to the concrete and steel of the 20th century. Joining the National Park Service in 1946, the park continues to protect the Potomac River. From I-95/495 take exit 3, Indian Head Highway South/MD 210. Travel about 4 miles to Fort Washington Road, turn right. The park is located at the end of the road. From Waldorf, MD: MD228 to Indian Head Highway/MD210 North. Turn left onto Old Fort Road. Continue to end of road, at the stop sign turn left onto Fort Washington Road, continue to park entrance. Fort Washington Park Visitor Center The visitor center is the yellow house that sits outside the historic fort. From I-95/495 take exit 3, Indian Head Highway South/MD 210. Travel about 4 miles to Fort Washington Road, turn right. The park is located at the end of the road. From Waldorf, MD: MD228 to Indian Head Highway/MD210 North. Turn left onto Old Fort Road. Continue to end of road, at the stop sign turn left onto Fort Washington Road, continue to park entrance. After entering the park, follow the road straight to the main parking lot. The visitor center is the yellow building on the hill. Fort Washington Volunteers firing a cannon Fort Washington Volunteers firing a cannon Fort Washington Guard fires one of the park's cannons. Demonstrations are presented during the summer months April-October. Entrance to Fort Washington Entrance way into historic Fort Washington Fort Washington Entrance Picnic Area A at Fort Washington Park Picnic Area at Fort Washington Park Picnic Area A is one of the areas available to reserve. Park has a variety of wildlife photo of three white tailed deer Doe with two fawns Cannon crew at Fort Washington Men in blue army uniforms pose by a cannon. Check out the park's cannon demonstrations to experience the sights, sounds, and smells of the past! Eagles Have Peaceful Easy Feeling Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nesting on national park and associated lands in the Chesapeake Bay are doing well. A recent study shows their numbers, once crippled by the effects of the insecticide DDT and other pollutants, are now growing. And juvenile eagles screened for pollutants generally showed low and undetectable exposure levels. A fluffy black eaglet sit on a towel in the sun Bat Projects in Parks: National Capital Parks East Acoustic and mist netting in Fort Washington and Piscataway Park. Scenic view of Piscataway Park's boardwalk 2014 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Introducing the national and regional recipients of the 2014 Freeman Tilden Awards, given in recognition of new and innovative programs in interpretation. Two rangers holding a whale skull Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Fort Washington Park Yields Unusual Find In the spring of 2006, NPS staff found a cache of objects in an attic of the Enlisted Men’s Barracks at Fort Washington, Maryland, a fortification overlooking the Potomac River, now part of the NPS National Capital Parks. NPS archeological staff investigated a collection of diverse items that has the potential to enlarge our understanding of living conditions at the fort during and after the Civil War. Worn checkerboard. Fort Washington Park Cultural Landscape Washington Park is a recreational and historical area south of Washington, D.C. that interprets the development of coastal defenses in the Washington, D.C. area. The fort has remained relatively unaltered since the last major modifications in the late 1840s, and the layout and characteristics from the Endicott Period are easily identified. The landscape is also the former site of Warburton Manor, the Digges's family plantation that predated the fort. Tall archway opens through a red brick gatehouse in the wall of a brick fort Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Ten Tips for Visiting Fort Washington Park Follow these tips to make your visit to Fort Washington Park memorable. The grassy fort in front of a river Sea Level Rise Impact on DC Parks Sea level rise is occurring on a global scale as the result of many climate change-induced factors. It is impacting 111 National Park Service (NPS) sites nationwide. In the National Capital Region, sea level rise is occurring at a particularly rapid rate because the land bordering the Potomac and Anacostia rivers is simultaneously sinking as the water levels rise. Above view of Dyke Marsh Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background.

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