"Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site" by NPS/Olmsted NHS , public domain

Frederick Law Olmsted

National Historic Site - Massachusetts

Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site is located in Brookline, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston. Frederick Law Olmsted (1822–1903) is recognized as the founder of American landscape architecture and the nation's foremost parkmaker of the 19th century. In 1883, Olmsted moved his home to suburban Boston and established "Fairsted", the world's first full-scale professional office for the practice of landscape design.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/frla/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Law_Olmsted_National_Historic_Site Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site is located in Brookline, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston. Frederick Law Olmsted (1822–1903) is recognized as the founder of American landscape architecture and the nation's foremost parkmaker of the 19th century. In 1883, Olmsted moved his home to suburban Boston and established "Fairsted", the world's first full-scale professional office for the practice of landscape design. Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) is recognized as the founder of American landscape architecture and the nation's foremost parkmaker. Olmsted moved his home to suburban Boston in 1883 and established the world's first full-scale professional office for the practice of landscape design. During the next century, his sons and successors perpetuated Olmsted's design ideals, philosophy, and influence. Site is located on the southwest corner of Warren and Dudley Streets in Brookline, south of Route 9, near the Brookline Reservoir. Site is 0.7 miles from the Brookline Hills MBTA stop on the Green Line, D Branch. Visitor Center Visitor center, bookstore, and self guided exhibits too the right at the front of the house. Design office tours depart from the visitor center. Entrances accessed through back parking lot or main house entrance through front vestibule are staff entrances. Visitor center, bookstore, and self guided exhibits are accessible through the Visitor Entrance. This entrance is located at the front of the house, the right most door from the circular drive. Entrances accessed through back parking lot or main house entrance through front vestibule are historic or staff entrances and are not available for public use. Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site Fairsted Fairsted, the home and office of landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site. Drafting Table Dark wood box with four shallow drawers on large wooden table with blueprint A box of colored pencils and a draftsmen's handbook sit on a table in the drafting room. These materials reflect the period during which Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. was the senior partner in the Brookline, MA landscape architecture firm. The Hollow A shaded bench and plants in a sunken garden surrounded by bushes Landscape Architect Frederick Law Olmsted designed the Hollow on his Brookline, MA property to be a peaceful, picturesque sunken garden. National Park Getaway: Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site Frederick Law Olmsted is recognized as the founder of American landscape architecture as well as “America’s Parkmaker." Besides being a home for his family, “Fairsted,” as Olmsted named his estate, was where he, his sons, and associates created the world's first full-scale office for the practice of landscape architecture. Front exterior of red house covered in ivy Designing the Parks: Learning in Action The Designing the Parks program is not your typical internship. Each year since 2013, this program at the Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation has introduced a cohort of college students and recent graduates to NPS design and planning professions through projects related to cultural landscape stewardship. In the internships, made possible by partner organizations, participants focus on an in-depth project that directly engages with a national park unit. A group of young people stand on forest trail and listen to two maintenance employees 2011 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Discover the innovative and exciting programs of the recipients of the national and regional 2011 Freeman Tilden Awards for excellence in interpretation. LIza Stearns Mona McKindley Mona McKindley is a gardener at three national historic sites in the Boston metropolitan area. She is responsible for the daily care of all three former residential landscapes, two of which were designed by famous designers and pioneers in the American landscape architecture profession. Her knowledge for both horticulture and history guides her stewardship of these landscapes. Mona McKindley sprays water from a hose onto plants in a garden. The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg STEAM at Fairsted- Bridge Building Build a model bridge, inspired by the landscape design models built in the Olmsted office! As the site of the nation’s first full-scale, professional landscape architecture office, we have many examples of creative uses of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math. We would love you to try out something inspired by the happenings of the Olmsted office! Volunteer sits at table building small balsa wood bridge STEAM at Fairsted- Blue Printing Create your own sunprint, inspired by the blueprint technology used in the Olmsted office. As the site of the nation’s first full-scale, professional landscape architecture office, we have many examples of creative uses of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math. Close up view of word Olmsted sunprinted on blue paper STEAM at Fairsted- Planting What would parks be without plants? As the site of the nation’s first full-scale, professional landscape architecture office, we have many examples of creative uses of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math. We would love you to try out something inspired by the happenings of the Olmsted office! Seedling with four leaves growing in pot, seen from above STEAM at Fairsted- Watercolor Create a watercolor landscape, inspired by the work of the Olmsted firm's draftsmen, who created watercolor paintings to show clients what the completed landscape would look like. As the site of the nation’s first full-scale, professional landscape architecture office, we have many examples of creative uses of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math. We would love you to try out something inspired by the happenings of the Olmsted office! Watercolor of tree in lawn STEAM at Fairsted- Space Slime As the site of the nation’s first full-scale, professional landscape architecture office, we have a lot of examples of creative uses of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math. We would love you to try out some thing inspired by the happenings of the Olmsted office! STEAM in block letters History of Women in Landscape Architecture A brief history of women in the field of landscape architecture, including connections to the Olmsted firm. Fat Book Week You've heard of #FatBearWeek...now get ready for #FatBookWeek! In honor of the 10,000+ books in the Longfellow family collection, we called on other literary-minded sites to submit the fattest book in their museum collections for a tournament-style bracket of 10 heavyweight tomes. Check out the bracket, then visit @LONGNPS on Instagram each morning from October 6-12 to vote for your favorite bulky book! Graphic of a bear with a paw on a stack of books. Text reads "Fat Book Week October 6-12, 2021" Olmsteds: Landscapes and Legacies Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, in partnership with the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT), will host a three-day symposium as part of Olmsted 200, the national bicentennial commemoration of the birth of Frederick Law Olmsted, social reformer and founder of American landscape architecture. Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site Cambridge American Cemetery The Cambridge American Cemetery honors the service and sacrifice of more than 8,500 Americans who died in military operations based out of the United Kingdom (U.K.) during World War II. Olmsted National Historic Site Creating a Campus: The 19th Century College Architecture of the Pioneer Valley An article in the Mount Holyoke Alumnae Quarterly Winter 1988 edition states, “Like George Washington who seemed to have slept in every eighteenth century home in the Colonies, Frederick Law Olmsted, plus his son [sic] and associates, appears to have had a hand in the landscape design of just about every large estate, park, and campus during the last part of the nineteenth century and the early years of this century.” Olmsted and Yosemite: Civil War, Abolition, and the National Park Idea Rolf Diamant and Ethan Carr, Olmsted and Yosemite: Civil War, Abolition, and the National Park Idea (Amherst, MA: Library of American Landscape History, 2022) Both Central Park in New York and Yosemite Valley in California became public parks during the tumultuous years before and during the Civil War. Rolf Diamant and Ethan Carr demonstrate how anti-slavery activism, war, and the remaking of the federal government gave rise to the American public park. Olmsted National Historic Site Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and the Improvement of Boulder, Colorado Imagine Boulder in the early 1900’s. There were not quite 10,000 people living in town, less than a tenth of Boulder’s population today. There were no paved streets and Boulder’s focus as a mining supply town was still in full force, with numerous smelters and mills located right along Boulder Creek. While Boulder had been selected as a site for the state university in 1861, it didn’t open until 1877, and in 1910 graduated just 163 students. Olmsted National Historic Site Frederick Law Olmsted Jr’s Mountain Lake Sanctuary: The Creation and Legacy of a Didactic Landscape The Mountain Lake Sanctuary and Bok Singing Tower near Lake Wales, Florida was the brainchild of its patron, Edward W. Bok, the Philadelphia based editor of the Ladies Home Journal and his wife, Mary Louise Curtis Bok. But it came to fruition through the leadership of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and a design team that included architect Milton Medary, sculptor Lee Lawrie, and metalworker Samuel Yellin. Finding Olmsted in the Restoration of the U.S. Capitol Grounds The Architect of the Capitol has embarked on a comprehensive project to restore the original arboretum of nearly 1000 trees at the United States Capitol as designed and constructed under the guidance of Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr. from 1874 to 1894. This paper presents the challenges, unexpected findings, and applications of a complex process that integrates archival research with current geospatial data for analyzing the integrity of the historic design and planning for futur Olmsted Historic Site Managing Historic Infrastructure in a Rapidly Changing Environment Historic recreation routes at Acadia National Park were developed over time by different interests; the hiking trails network was created by the Rusticators, the carriage roads were developed by John D. Rockefeller Jr., and the motor road was also built by Rockefeller Jr. Incorporating Contemporary Accessibility Features into a Historic Landscape This presentation will provide an overview of the planning, designing, compliance, construction, and current use of an accessible trail that meets the laws and standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) while preserving the historic cultural landscape of the formal allée as designed by Frederick Olmsted Jr. for Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial in 1927 when the area was managed by the Indiana Lincoln Union. Series: Olmsteds: Landscapes and Legacies ”Through events, education, and advocacy at the local and national levels, Olmsted 200 ensures that the legacies of the Olmsteds live on across the country by renewing public and policy commitments to the preservation and maintenance of our historic parks and places. Olmsted Now is the Greater Boston effort, an inclusive coalition that connects communities and organizations commemorating Greater Boston’s bicentennial of Brookline-based Olmsted with the “fierce urgency of now.” Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site The Olmsted Brothers 1918 Report on Washington D.C.’s Rock Creek Park: America’s First National Park General Management Plan The Olmsted Brothers 1918 report on the development of Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C., is the first comprehensive general management plan prepared for a U.S. national park. While Rock Creek Park’s status as a national park is often disregarded, the federal reservation’s 1890 authorization coincided with the first major expansion of the nascent national park system in which Yosemite, Sequoia, and General Grant also received official designation. Olmsted National Historic Site Bringing the Planting Fields Cultural Landscape Report to the Ground: Main Drive Renewal Project Planting Fields holds a prominent position in the Long Island community as a place for learning and enjoyment. From 1919 to the 1950s, the Olmsted Brothers and Coe collaboration shaped a rich Olmsted design palette and horticultural richness elevating and integrating the prior design efforts. The 400-acre former estate regional state park and arboretum carries on Coe’s legacy in the rich, diverse arboretum. Olmsted National Historic Site Adapting Washington’s Capitol Campus While Preserving the Olmsted Landscape Legacy Our paper will share impacts of the robust community engagement program developed to gain public comment as Legislative Campus Modernization project adds nearly 150,000 square feet in the first major addition to the historic Capitol Campus since the Olmsted Brothers’ landscape was completed in 1931. Olmed National Historic site Balancing Adaptation and Legacy: How the Washington National Cathedral is Protecting its Olmsted Woods in the Era of Climate Change In this presentation, participants will learn about Olmsted’s role in the development of the National Cathedral grounds and recent efforts to ensure that this historic landscape can respond to the pressures of climate change in a way that guarantees longevity and honors the intent of Olmsted’s original design. Olmsted National Historic Site The Insane Asylum Landscapes of Olmsted and Vaux Olmsted and Vaux also designed and consulted on a number of insane asylum landscapes during the 1860s, 70s, and 80s. At the time, these landscapes were at the forefront of what would become the emerging medical specialization of psychiatry. Moral treatment was the prevailing method of care in these institutions, was a Quaker-inspired psychiatric practice that combined spiritual guidance, behavior modifications, and physical activity to administer patient healing. Olmsted National Historic Site “Once in a Lifetime” Opportunity to Restore Greenspace to Boston's Franklin Park “Shattuck Hospital, now slated for demolition, currently sits on park land, a site that was taken from the community in 1949 and over the years has joined other sites that reduced Franklin Park’s free and public offerings to all by over 40%—roughly 200 acres of parkland that are not freely accessible to the public,” said Karen Mauney-Brodek, President of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy. Olmsted National Historic Site Olmsted’s 1883 Plan for Colgate University and its Impacts on the Campus Olmsted came to Madison University (now Colgate) in mid-September 1883 at the behest of James B. Colgate, the leader of the University Board, and Ebenezer Dodge, University President. His primary charge was to advise the University on the siting of a Library/Museum and a Laboratory though earlier correspondence had also made it clear that the University desired a more comprehensive assessment of its expanding grounds. Olmsted National Historic Site A Tale of Two Cities: Preserving the Olmsted Brothers Legacies in Seattle and Spokane, Washington The Olmsted Brothers, Landscape Architects took their famous father’s principles of landscape design into the 20th century, designing parks and boulevard plans for numerous young cities in the topographically gifted Northwest. One hundred years later, two of these cities, Seattle and Spokane, are reassessing the Olmsted plans that influenced everything from land acquisition to park design and funding for Parks departments. Olmsted National Historic Site Photo Safari- Bear Dens The Franklin Park Zoo was opened in 1912. When the zoo opened, its first official exhibits were the aviary and the bear dens, designed in 1911 by Arthur Schurcliff. Holding a variety of bear species, purchased from Germany and Yellowstone National Park, as well as a badger held in a nearby cage, the bear dens attracted thousands of people to the zoo everyday. flat open field with trees on the edges and large group of sheep scattered around Photo Safari- Arnold Arboretum The Arnold Arboretum Visitor Center, otherwise known as the Hunnewell Building, was designed in 1892 by Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow Jr., the nephew of the famous American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The building was finally constructed in 1903 with funds donated by H.H. Hunnewell from whom the building received its name. path with lots of foliage on both sides. On the path, many people walk and look at the plants Photo Safari- Schoolmaster Hill Schoolmaster Hill was designed by Franklin Park's designer, Frederick Law Olmsted. It is made up of a terrace, and a connected shelter, leading out towards the Ninety Nine steps and the edge of the park. Originally "covered by vines on trellises and furnished with tables and seats," the building also provided complimentary hot water for visitors to make tea. A multi-use building, it at one time housed the superintendent's office and served as the golf course club house. two men sit on rock wall, behind them is large area of trees and shrubs Photo Safari- Pinebank Although many of the parks, places, and private residences designed by Frederick Law Olmsted reflect nature shaped dramatically by the human hand. It was at Jamaica Park that the real landscape architect was Mother Earth. Crafted not so much with shovels and surveying equipment but rather by the slow drag of glaciers, Jamaica Pond's natural perfection brought out a side of Olmsted that people are not as familiar with: Olmsted the conservationist. trees on the edge of the water, with others on the other side Photo Safari- Muddy River The Muddy River is a part of a system of brooks and ponds that run through sections of Boston's Emerald Necklace into the Charles River. Flowing north, it connects Jamaica Pond, Willow Pond, and finally Leverett Pond. At this point is a narrow channel that flows between Brookline and Boston eventually passing through the Back Bay Fens towards the Charles River. body of water, with both sides having a walking path and dense foliage Photo Safari- Victory Gardens The Back Bay Fens has transformed over and over again throughout the years. The original shallow bay became a foul salt marsh after the filling in the Back Bay in the mid-19th century. Then, Frederick Law Olmsted, working with the city engineer, converted the smelly grounds into a "park" with a stream running through it that Olmsted described as a "sanitary improvement". lush garden with open area, pond, and large building in distance Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Lauren Meier Essay Lauren G. Meier, of the American Society of Landscape Architects and Friends of Fairsted, reflects on the significance and loss of the Olmsted Elm. Stump of tree with easel on top of it Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Daniel Cavicchi Essay Daniel Cavicchi, Associate Professor of American Studies and Head of the Department of History at the Rhode Island School of Design, describes the impact of the Witness Tree seminar. Tree stump with easel on top of it Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Dale Broholm Essay Dale Broholm, Senior Critic in the Department of Furniture Design, Rhode Island School of Design, reflects on the work with the Olmsted Elm material and visiting the Fairsted grounds as part of the Witness Tree Project. Tree stump with easel on top of it Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Charlie Pepper Essay Charlie Pepper, Senior Project Manager, Preservation Maintenance & Education, Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation, reflects on his twenty five years of stewardship for the Olmsted Elm in his NPS career. Tree stump with easel on top of it Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Assignment Two Seven students from the Rhode Island School of Design used material from the Olmsted Elm to address the prompt: Leisure activities, play, relaxation in public spaces have changed in many ways during the past century. Identify a period of time in America’s past, staring with the 1850s, and create an object that reflects a form of leisure, play, recreation, etc. that would have been popular and recognizable during the selected time period. tree stump with easel sitting on top Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Assignment One Eight students from the Rhode Island School of Design used material from the Olmsted Elm to address the prompt: Frederick Law Olmsted was a man of many interests and occupations. Some more successful than others. Choose one of these occupations and make an object that you think Olmsted would have wanted to have with him during the practice of the chosen occupation. Tree stump with easel on top of it Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Alan Banks Essay Alan Banks, Supervisory Park Ranger at Frederick Law Olmsted NHS, reflects on his view of the Olmsted Elm from his arrival at the site in 1990 till its loss in 2011. Tree stump with easel on top of it Echoes of the Olmsted Elm Assignment Three Five students from the Rhode Island School of Design used material from the Olmsted Elm to address the prompt: The demands of public spaces in a democratic society have been fraught with turmoil since our country’s founding. Public usage of public spaces does not always conform to the expectations of society nor necessarily adhere to the laws of a given time. Pick a period and explore this issue through an object. tree stump with easel sitting on top Frederick Law Olmsted: Landscapes and Legacies Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) is recognized as the founder of American landscape architecture and the nation's foremost parkmaker. Olmsted moved his home to suburban Boston in 1883 and established the world's first full-scale professional office for the practice of landscape design. During the next century, his sons and successors perpetuated Olmsted's design ideals, philosophy, and influence. I want to make myself useful in the world - Olmsted Quote Series: Echoes of the Olmsted Elm: Works from the Rhode Island School of Design Witness Tree Project The Olmsted Elm came down in March 2011 due to age and instability. The opening essays introduce the Olmsted Elm from the perspective of several who knew it well. Lasting personal and professional impacts of this important tree are conveyed in these first-hand accounts. The essays that follow are the RISD students’ written components of their Witness Tree Project assignments. Their ideas, crafted in text and wood, express their understandings and interpretations of the three studied topics. tree stump with easel on top

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