"Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve Scenery" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Gates Of The Arctic

National Park & Preserve - Alaska

Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve is a U.S. National Park in Alaska. It is the northernmost national park in the U.S. (the entirety of the park lies north of the Arctic Circle) and the second largest at 8,472,506 acres (3,428,702 ha), slightly larger in area than Belgium. The park consists primarily of portions of the Brooks Range of mountains. A large part of the park is protected in the Gates of the Arctic Wilderness which covers 7,167,192 acres (2,900,460 ha). The wilderness area adjoins the Noatak Wilderness Area and together they form the largest contiguous wilderness in the United States.

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Official visitor map of Gates Of The Arctic National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Gates of the Arctic - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Gates Of The Arctic National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Cape Krusenstern National Monument (NM) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cape Krusenstern - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cape Krusenstern National Monument (NM) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Dalton Highway from Fairbanks to Coldfoot in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Dalton Highway - Fairbanks to Coldfoot

Map of Dalton Highway from Fairbanks to Coldfoot in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Dalton Highway from Coldfoot to Deadhorse in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Dalton Highway - Coldfoot to Deadhorse

Map of Dalton Highway from Coldfoot to Deadhorse in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/gaar/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gates_of_the_Arctic_National_Park_and_Preserve Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve is a U.S. National Park in Alaska. It is the northernmost national park in the U.S. (the entirety of the park lies north of the Arctic Circle) and the second largest at 8,472,506 acres (3,428,702 ha), slightly larger in area than Belgium. The park consists primarily of portions of the Brooks Range of mountains. A large part of the park is protected in the Gates of the Arctic Wilderness which covers 7,167,192 acres (2,900,460 ha). The wilderness area adjoins the Noatak Wilderness Area and together they form the largest contiguous wilderness in the United States. This vast landscape does not contain any roads or trails. Visitors discover intact ecosystems where people have lived with the land for thousands of years. Wild rivers meander through glacier-carved valleys, caribou migrate along age-old trails, endless summer light fades into aurora-lit night skies of winter. It remains virtually unchanged except by the forces of nature. Gates of the Arctic is a wilderness park, with no roads or trails into the park lands, so visitors must fly or hike into the park. Access begins in Fairbanks, Alaska & there are several small airlines that provide daily flights into the communities of Bettles, Anaktuvuk Pass, and Coldfoot. Most visitors access the park by air taxi or hike in from the Dalton Highway or from the village of Anaktuvuk Pass. River crossings are necessary from both locations. Anaktuvuk Pass Ranger Station The Anaktuvuk Pass Ranger Station is staffed during the summer season from April through September, typically Monday-Friday, 9-5:30. Here you can learn about the park, and gain advice on hiking routes in the area. Bear Resistant Food Containers are available to borrow as well. Outside display is open year-round. The Anaktuvuk Pass Ranger Station is located in the center of the village, on Main Street. Arctic Interagency Visitor Center Multi-agency visitor center located on the Dalton Highway in Coldfoot, Alaska West side of Dalton Highway, opposite of Coldfoot Camp Bettles Ranger Station and Visitor Center The Bettles Ranger Station is situated outside of the boundaries of Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve, in Bettles, Alaska. This small ranger station and visitor center has exhibits, park-related films, interpretive programs, and trip-planning tools. Across Airport Road from the Bettles airport Fairbanks Alaska Public Lands Information Center Explore world-class exhibits, watch a free informative movie, and receive assistance on your trip planning needs while at the Alaska Public Lands Information Center, located inside of the Morris Thompson Cultural & Visitors Center in Fairbanks, Alaska. Located in downtown Fairbanks, on the corner of Wendell and Dunkel Streets Alatna River Aerial view of the Alatna River as it winds through a valley Aerial view of the Alatna River as it winds through a valley Arrigetch Peaks Alpenglow on the granite cliffs of mountains A spring alpenglow brightens the granite walls of the Arrigetch Peaks Entering Oolah Valley A hiker crosses a stream with mountains in the background A hiker crosses a stream and enters Oolah Valley. Blueberries Handful of blueberries Pausing to pick blueberries can result in a handful of delicious snacks. Hikers crossing a mountain pass Two hikers climb up a mountain pass Hikers choose river valleys as corridors when hiking over mountain passes. Nellie Cashman Learn about Nellie Cashman: businesswoman, miner, prospector, philanthropist, voter. painting of a young woman Home, home on your range? Read the abstract and get the link to a paper published in the Journal of Wildlife Management about the overlap across four Arctic caribou herds: Prichard, A. K., L. S. Parrett, E. A. Lenart, J. R. Caikoski, K. Joly, and B. T. Person. 2020. Interchange and overlap among four adjacent Arctic caribou herds. Journal of Wildlife Management 1-15. Caribou in brushy northern forest. Permafrost Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Permafrost underlies most of the Arctic Network and affects nearly everything in the arctic ecosystem. Thawing permafrost also changes the local hydrology and creates the second-greatest disturbance to boreal forests, after wildfires. Recent warm and wet conditions caused some thaw of ice masses and surface subsidence in Arctic parks that ultimately led to a record number of drained of shallow lakes. This brief provides an update on permafrost monitoring in the Arctic Network Polygonal shaped tundra due to underlying permafrost Rachel Riley As one of the last remaining persons to have completed The Long Walk - a major and permanent move to the final destination of the previously nomadic Nunamiut people - Rachel Riley was a leading advocate for the continuing knowledge and practice of the traditional Nunamiut culture. Rachel's most prominent role was as an Inupiaq language teacher. Rachel Riley as a child in 1949, soon after completing The Long Walk as an eight-year-old girl. Arctic Cryosphere: snow, water, ice, and permafrost This article is a summary of findings from the Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic report by the Arctic Council Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme. A person dwarfed in the expansive snow-covered tundra of the Arctic. Snowshoe Hare Snowshoe hares live in the boreal forests of North America and are active year-round. They gain their curious name from their very large hind feet form a snowshoe, supporting their weight on the surface of the snow. Hares greatly influence the world around them, including the vegetation, predators, and other herbivores and omnivores that live in the same habitats. a white colored hare under a shrub in snow A Soil Survey from the Early 1990s Valuable in Today's Decisions A Soil Survey from the Early 1990s Valuable in Today's Decisions Abandoned Mine Lands in Alaska National Parks—An Overview From the thousands of mining claims that existed at when Congress created most national parks in Alaska, around 750 still remain. These are mainly abandoned sites and features, in various stages of disrepair and failure. Since 1981, the NPS has worked to quantify the number and type of hazards posed by these sites and has pursued a variety of solutions to mitigate the issues, such as visitor safety hazards, presented by relic mining features. dilapidated wood building in a mountainous setting Subsistence The study of subsistence resources in parks has been a mix of long-term work and projects instigated by issues facing the Federal Subsistence Board. Winter hunting is an important subsistence activity in many Alaska communities and park areas. Alaska Native Place Names in Arctic Parks Indigenous place names are rich ethnographic and historical resources. Many of them refer to activities that regularly took place at the site; others tell of historical events that occurred there. These names have been replaced by English names on modern maps; this article discusses efforts to document these names into the future. a group of people near a canvas tent, alongside a large river Red Fox Despite the name, red foxes come in a variety of colors. They're found throughout the United States and are not uncommon sightings in many national parks. two red foxes Science in Wilderness Marine Reserves ANILCA establishes the largest scientific laboratory...ever! A spawning salmon struggles to get back into the water. A Tribute: Dave Spirtes, 1948-2004 A tribute to a lost colleague and friend, Dave Spirtes. Dave Spirtes holds an award presented to him by Ron Arnberger, Alaska Regional Director (retired). 2016 Science Education Grant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2016 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. a photographer takes a picture in the grass while the sun sets Prehistoric Obsidian Procurement and Transport in Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve Since the discovery of a prominent obsidian source near the Indian River, a tributary of the Koyukuk, numerous researchers have investigated obsidian use in prehistoric Alaska. Learn more about the studies from Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve that have illuminated evidence of an elaborate network of long distance trade and cultural interaction throughout prehistoric Alaska and beyond. close up of a piece of obsidian with the sunlight shining through it In Celebration of ANILCA Former President, Jimmy Carter, offers a sentimental introduction to the 25th Anniversary Edition of Alaska Park Science and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). Black and white photo of six white men standing in front of an old National Park Service Building. A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. Old is Getting Older In the last 25 years, persistent archaeological survey and improved scientific techniques have resulted in new data which confirms that Alaska sites are actually much earlier than we once believed. NPS archaeologist works at Amakomanak site in Noatak National Preserve. Tent Ring Archaeology in Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve This article explores what a tent ring is and what cultures of Alaskan people once created them. A big question asked in this article is "Are all the tent rings in Gates of the Arctic attributed to Nunamiut occupations?" Through a series of comparisons of different tent rings, the author eventually reaches an answer to the question and realizes the importance of archaeology in Gates of the Arctic. A tent ring. Download Alaska Park Science: Volume 16, Issue 1 Download a print-friendly copy of Volume 16, Issue 1 of Alaska Park Science. a group of muskox running across a field Arctic brown bears like salmon, too! Read the abstract and get the link to an article on the use of salmon streams by brown bears in the Arctic: Sorum, M. S., K. Joly, and M. D. Cameron. 2019. Use of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by brown bears (Ursos arctos) in an Arctic, interior, montane environment. The Canadian Field-Naturalist 133(2):151-155. A bear stands in a river fishing with two cubs on the bank. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Gates Of The Arctic National Park, Alaska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] lone hiker in large valley Lichens as Indicators Read the abstract and link to an article on Arctic lichens published in The Bryologist: Nelson P. R., B. McCune, and D. K. Swanson. 2015. Lichen traits and species as indicators of vegetation and environment. The Bryologist 118(3):252-263. A tiny community of Arctic lichens, including the "pixie cup" Cladonia species. Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Land Ownership in National Park System Units in Alaska and Possibilities for Mining and Other Developments There are over 54 million acres of National Park System units in Alaska, which is 65 percent of the entire National Park System. Although most of those lands are in federal ownership and are managed by the NPS, there are over two million acres of non-federally owned lands within those units. These non-federal lands are in private, state, borough, or municipal ownership. The existence of these lands creates the possibility of mining and other developments within the boundaries rustic buildings near a creek, hills and mountains in the distance Studying Arctic Marine Mammals in the Shipping Age Pod of narwhals, one of the few mammals endemic to the Arctic Ocean. Photo used by permission from Kristin Laidre A pod of narwhals surfaces in the Arctic. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2018 Fire Season Despite the relatively quiet fire season in Alaska in 2018, the National Park Service saw 24 wildfires spanning over 36,000 acres burning within and adjacent to park boundaries. Six of those fires were in Cape Krusenstern National Monument. An anvil-shaped smoke plume rises above the tree line on the Yukon River. Building PIO capacity in Alaska National Park Service Public Information Officers were in short supply last fire season. To help bolster the numbers, NPS Alaska recruits 12 new staff members to assist with all hazard and wildfire incidents. A fire public information officer highlights updates on a fire to members of the public. Aurora Borealis: A Brief Overview A brief overview of how Northern Lights occur. two ribbons of greenish light in a dark blue sky, over a very dark forest Hunting and Subsistence Use of Dall Sheep Learn about the two ways humans harvest sheep - for subsistence use and in sport hunting. a male sheep Alaska's Northern Parks: The Wonder of the Arctic The Arctic is a region characterized by extremes and adaptation. It is rich in natural and cultural history. The articles in this edition of Alaska Park Science highlight the many facets of life in the Arctic. stone outcrop in the Arctic tundra Small Mammals as Indicators of Climate, Biodiversity, and Ecosystem Change This is a time of rapid environmental changes in Alaska. Species that have evolved within tundra habitats over multiple glacial cycles are not only best adapted to high-latitude and high-elevation environments, but may also respond more slowly to change. Studies of small mammal communities could provide valuable insights to larger ecosystem changes. two marmots perched atop a large boulder Declining Sheep Populations in Alaska’s Arctic Parks Dall’s sheep are an important subsistence species for local residents, particularly when caribou are scarce, and they are highly valued by sport hunters and wildlife enthusiasts. Their populations may be at an all-time low, however, in Noatak National Preserve and Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve due to weather conditions and other factors. a woman kneeling in snow, collecting sheep shit 2013 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2013 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. A Ranger stands with two junior rangers 2014 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2014 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. Two students kneel in grassy field taking notes while looking at pink flagged marked locations Wolverines Wolverine. The name alone stirs up visions of northern wilderness. Wolverines belong to the mustelidae family along with weasels, mink, marten, and otters. The family mustelidae makes up most of the order Carnivora (carnivores). a wolverine on a snow-covered river digging at something partially buried 2019 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2019 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. a park ranger and kids standing in shallow lake water Snowshoe hare use of mineral licks Read the abstract and link to the recently published article in Ecology on hare geophagy: Kielland, K., D. DiFolco, and C. Montgomerie. 2018. Dining dangerously: Geophagy by snowshoe hares. Ecology DOI:10.1002/ecy.2555 A hare eats mineral soil. North for Science! Learns About Fire Ecology in Alaska This summer's North for Science! Program included a lesson in wildland fire ecology in Alaska. The funding for the fire ecology portion was made possible by the National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program. Students were provided an incredible opportunity to learn about the role of wildland fire in boreal and arctic ecosystems. A group of eight students sit atop the Arctic Interagency Visitor Center's welcome sign. Caribou: Did You Know? Did you know facts and life history about the Western Arctic Caribou Herd of northwest Alaska Bull caribou in the Brooks Range mountains of Alaska Fire in the Range of Western Arctic Caribou Herd Wildland fire may have a significant impact on lichen-dependent caribou within the tundra ecosystem. A caribou carrying heavy antlers walks slowly though green tundra on a hazy, grey day. Jeff Rasic - Archaeologist Jeff Rasic, an archaeologist by training, is a program manager for natural and cultural resources at Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve in Alaska. Jeff Rasic 2018 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2018 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. an instructor and a camper work on a carving The Fate of Permafrost At present, permafrost is continuous in Arctic parks and discontinuous in Denali and Wrangell St.-Elias national parks and preserves. We expect the distribution of permafrost will still be continuous in Arctic parks by the 2050s; however, it is very likely that the distribution of permafrost in Denali and Wrangell-St. Elias will become sporadic by then. a person standing next to an eroded hillside Artists Spotlight Alaskan Wilderness Voices of the Wilderness Traveling Art Exhibit is a collection of paintings, photographs, sculptures, poetry, and other works inspired by Alaska’s wilderness. quilt of two white birch trees Caribou: Nomads of the North Caribou are an iconic Arctic species that are highly adaptable both physiologically and behaviorally. Yet, caribou populations face many challenges, such as climate change and industrial development, and are in decline in many portions of their range. two bull caribou swimming through a river 2015 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2015 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. Students kneel in a wetland and examine a net Jillian Richie - Archaeologist Jillian Richie is an archaeologist for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska. Jillian in the field, preparing an archaeological field site. Amy Larsen - Aquatic Ecologist/Pilot Amy Larsen is an aquatic ecologist and pilot for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve in Alaska. Amy Larsen collecting field data on shallow lakes. Caribou Migration Linked to Climate Cycles and Insect Pests Read the abstract and get the link to an article published in Ecosphere on climate and insect drivers for caribou migration: : Gurarie, E., M. Hebblewhite, K. Joly, A. P. Kelly, J. Adamczewski, S. C. Davidson, T. Davison, A. Gunn, M. J. Suitor, W. F. Fagan, and N. Boelman. 2019. Tactical departures and strategic arrivals: Divergent effects of climate and weather on caribou spring migrations. Ecosphere 10(12):e02971. 10.1002/ecs2.2971 Caribou migrate across snow-covered tundra. Larger Brown Bear Sows are More Successful in Rearing Cubs Read the abstract and get the link to a new article looking at Alaska brown bear cub recruitment across four populations: Hilderbrand, G. V., D. D. Gustine, K. Joly, B. Mangipane, W. Leacock, M. D. Cameron, M. S. Sorum, L. S. Mangipane, and J. A. Erlenbach. 2019. Influence of maternal body size, condition, and age on recruitment of four brown bear populations. Ursus 29(2): 111-118. A brown bear sow and four cubs. Brown Bear Den Sites Read the abstract and get the link to a new article on bear den site characteristics in the Brooks Range: Sorum, M. S., K. Joly, A. G. Wells, M. D. Cameron, G. V. Hilderbrand, and D. D. Gustine. 2019. Den-site characteristics and selection by brown bears (Ursus arctos) in the central Brooks Range of Alaska. Ecosphere 10(8): e02822. 10.1002/ecs2.2822 A close up of bear paws and claws. Donna DiFolco - Biological Technician Donna DiFolco is a biological technician for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska. Donna releasing a hare during field work. Caribou Resource Brief for the Arctic Network The Western Arctic Caribou Herd is one of the most critical subsistence resources in northwest Alaska. Monitoring the herd helps develop subsistence and sport hunting regulations that conserve the resource, protect critical habitat, and reduce conflicts among user groups. Since 2009, over 300 GPS collars have been deployed on caribou that have collected over 800,000 caribou locations. Caribou swim across the Kobuk River at Onion Portage in Kobuk Valley National Park Collared Pika Collared pikas are small mammals within the same order as rabbits and hares, and they resemble small rabbits with very short ears and small limbs. Adapted to thrive at high elevations in Alaska, their habitat is at risk -- climate change may drastically change the fragile environment in which they live. tiny gray rabbit-like creature sitting on a rock Arctic Ground Squirrel The largest of the North American ground squirrels, arctic ground squirrels are burrowing rodents that resemble prairie dogs, with small ears, a flat tail, and a white-spotted back. They are very common throughout much of Denali and live mainly in the alpine tundra. two ground squirrels Dall Sheep Dall sheep are unmistakable, looking like pure-white bighorn sheep. Like bighorn sheep, they have large, curled horns, but Dall sheep horns are longer and skinnier than their southern counterparts. They inhabit mountain ranges in Alaska and Canada and are often visible from quite far away. Close up of sheep face and horns The Surprising Diets of Brooks Range Brown Bears Read the abstract and get the link to a paper on brown bear diets in the interior Arctic of the Brooks Range: Mangipane, L. S., D. J. R. Lafferty, K. Joly, M. S. Sorum, M. D. Cameron, J. L. Belant, G. V. Hilderbrand, and D. D. Gustine. 2020. Dietary plasticity and the importance of salmon to brown bear (Ursus arctos) body size and condition in a low Arctic ecosystem. Polar Biology. A bear fishes a small stream. Salmon Sleuths: GPS-collared Bears Lead Researchers to Unknown Salmon Streams in Interior Alaska Movement data from GPS-collared bears provides valuable information to improve conservation efforts not only for bears, but also for salmon. This study describes the discovery of an unexpected relationship between bears and salmon in the Arctic Interior and the out-sized role salmon have on diet and movement patterns of grizzly bears living in a nutrient-limited system. Alaska Park Science 19(1):2020 A bear sow and 2 cubs fishing in an Arctic stream. Fish Inventories of the Upper Kobuk and Koyukuk River Basins Fish inventories in the Brooks Range added hundreds of new miles to the Anadromous Waters Catalog, improving overall knowledge of fish species assemblage, distribution, and abundance in the region. This information will help guide management actions on the proposed Ambler Road and future studies of aquatic resources. Alaska Park Science 19(1):2020 A helicopter landed on a small stream bank. Fall 2019 Weather Summary for Arctic Parks What was the weather like in Arctic Parks in 2019? Check out this weather summary for Fall 2019 for Bering Land Bridge NP, Gates of the Arctic NPP, and Western Arctic Parklands. Climate scientists repair climate station. Mountains in the backdrop. Hoary Marmot Hoary marmots are large rodents that live mainly in alpine areas. Their loud, clear warning calls are a common sound in mountainous regions. closeup of a marmot baby Magnetic Detection of Archaeological Hearths in Alaska Read the abstract and link to a recent article on archaeological research using magnetic detection of hearths: Urban, Thomas M., Jeffrey T. Rasic, Claire Alix, Douglas D. Anderson, Linda Chisholm, Robert W. Jacob, Sturt W. Manning, Owen K.Mason, Andrew H. Tremayne, Dale Vinson (2019). Magnetic detection of archaeological hearths in Alaska: A tool for investigating the full span of human presence at the gateway to North America. Quaternary Science Reviews 211: 73-92. An archaeologist searches for hearths using a magetometer Arctic Perennial Snowfields are Shrinking Read the abstract and get the link to an article on changes in perennial snowfields in the Brooks Range. Tedesche, M. E., E. D. Trochim, S. R. Fassnacht, and G. J. Wolken. 2019. Extent Changes in the Perennial Snowfields of Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Alaska. Hydrology 6, 53. A researcher records measurements on a snowfield high in the Brooks Range. Moose: Did You Know? Did You Know factoids about moose in Interior Alaska National Parks Bull moose bedded in vegetation Refining the Analysis of Hair Samples Read the abstract and get the link to a published paper on how bear hair is used to determine diet and how the method of using hair to determine diet is refined to detect seasonal variation. Rogers, M. C., G. V. Hilderbrand, D. D. Gustine, K. Joly, W. B. Lealock, B. A. Mangipane, and J. M. Welker. 2020. Splitting hairs: Dietary niche breadth modelling using stable isotope analysis of a sequentially grown tissue. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies. A close look at bear fur. Predicting Seasonal Distributions and Migratory Routes of Western Arctic Herd Caribou Read the abstract and get the link for an article on caribou migration patterns published in Movement Ecology: Baltensperger, A. P., and K. Joly. 2019. Using seasonal landscape models to predict space use and migratory patterns of an arctic ungulate. Movement Ecology 7 (18). DOI: 10.1186/s40462-019-0162-8. The western arctic caribou herd along the Kobuk River. Weather Impacts on Dall's Sheep Read the abstract and link to a recent paper in Ecosphere on Dall's sheep population impacts from weather events: Rattenbury, K. L., J. H. Schmidt, D. K. Swanson, B. L. Borg, B. A. Mangipane, and P. J. Sousanes. 2018. Delayed spring onset drives declines in abundance and recruitment in a mountain ungulate. Ecosphere 9(11):e02513. 10.1002/ecs2.2513 Dalls sheep lambs and ewes on a rock cliff. Permafrost Landforms as Indicators of Climate Change in Parks Across the Arctic Permafrost, ground so cold that it stays frozen for multiple years, develops certain landforms when it thaws, and thereby provides a way for scientists to recognize and monitor our changing climate. treeless hillside partially collapsed into a river at its base Research Fellowship Recipients (2015) Learn about 2015 Research Fellowship recipients a man sitting in a forest Research Fellowship Recipients: 2008 Learn about 2008 fellowship recipients Research Fellowship Recipients: 2009 Learn about 2009 research fellowship recipients The Social Structure of Dall Sheep Dall sheep employ a sophisticated social structure. A ewe and two lambs stand on a rocky cliff Monitoring Dall Sheep Discovery how and why scientists monitor Dall sheep in national parks throughout Alaska. A group of three dall sheep walk down a dirt road Dall Sheep and Climate Change How might climate change impact the world's northernmost wild sheep population? ewe and lamb on a rocky outcropping Birds of the Arctic Simon Paneak, a Nunamiut hunter, spent most of his adult life living in Anaktuvuk Pass in the Brooks Range. Simon was a fountain of traditional ecological knowledge, as were other adults within his community. However, Simon spoke, read, and wrote English, which facilitated his long collegial relationships with a variety of researchers interested in Arctic cultural and biological ecosystems. landscape of spruce forests and mountains Landbirds Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Approximately 147 resident and migratory bird species are expected to occur in the five National Parks of the Arctic Network. Among the songbirds breeding above treeline, White-crowned Sparrow, American Tree Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, and Wilson’s Warbler are ubiquitous and abundant. This resource brief summarizes long-term monitoring of landbirds in the Arctic Network. A Bluethroat perched in a willow in the golden light of the Arctic. What Future for the Wildness of Wilderness in the Anthropocene? Visionary as it was, the Wilderness Act did not anticipate today’s human-driven, global-scale changes. The idea of preserving wild lands challenges us with the irony that such places, untouched by humans, will only continue through our will to keep them that way. A resolute human purpose is needed to maintain the decision to have areas that are free of human purpose. aerial view of wolves moving single-file through a snowy forest Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness: A Case Study of Wildlife Harvest Practices on NPS Lands in Alaska The NPS responsibility to maintain natural wildlife populations is inherently challenging. For example, many animals migrate out of parks either seasonally or long-term. Typically, we collect and analyze data, and then publish our work. However, the answer rarely, if ever, lies solely in the data. Often the question is not even one of biology, but one of values. In these cases, nonscientific tools such as rigorous and transparent argument analyses are appropriate. bear eating a fish in shallow water The Economic and Cultural Benefits of Northwest Alaska Wilderness Northwest Alaska, from Kotzebue Sound to the headwaters of the Kobuk River, is approximately the size of Indiana. It is mostly roadless wild lands, dotted by eleven villages that are located on the coast or major rivers. The formal designation of wilderness areas in northwest Alaska contributes to sustaining an ecosystem that is predicated on an expansive area of natural habitat that is not fragmented by human development. four caribou swimming in neck-deep water Research Fellowship Recipients: 2012 Learn about 2012 Research Fellowship recipients woman in a red shirt and white hat Research Fellowship Recipients | 2014 Learn about 2014 Research Fellowship recipients. woman kneeling in water Monitoring Dall Sheep in Alaska's Arctic Parklands In an area the size of New Jersey, scientists study Dall's sheep. They are one of 28 vital signs monitored by the Arctic Network Inventory and Monitoring Program (ARCN I&M) because of their importance to the public and in assessing the overall health of the regional ecosystem. group of white colored sheep on a mountainside Alaska brown bears exposure to bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens Read the abstract and get the link to a new article on pathogens found in Alaska brown bears published in the Journal of Wildlife Disease: Ramey, A. M., C. A. Cleveland, G. V. Hilderbrand, K. Joly, D. D. Gustine, B. Mangipane, W. B. Leacock, A. P. Crupi, D. E. Hill, J. P. Dubey, and M. J. Yabsley. In press. Exposure of Alaska brown bears (Ursus arctos) to bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents varies spatiotemporally and may be influenced by age. A bear perched on a rock outcrop National Park Getaway: Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve North of the Arctic Circle lies a wild land barely changed from time immemorial, a park whose name invites adventure and exploration—Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve. Even amidst the grand landscapes of Alaska, the 8-million acre Gates of the Arctic remains a treasured destination for wilderness exploration. Is the Arctic too hot for moose? Read the abstract and get the link to a science article on how moose in the Arctic are impacted by climate change: Jennewein, J. S., M. Hebblewhite, P. Mahoney, S. Gilbert, A. J. H. Meddens, N. T. Boelman, K. Joly, K. Jones, K. A. Kellie, S. Brainerd, L. A. Vierling, and J. U. H. Eitel. 2020. Behavioral modifications by a large, northern herbivore to mitigate warming conditions. Movement Ecology 8(39). A moose gets some shade under spruce trees. Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake Matthew Cameron - Wildlife Biologist Matthew Cameron is a wildlife biologist at Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Matt Cameron portrait. Perennial Snowfields of the Central Brooks Range: Valuable Park Resources The nature of change in perennial snowfields in the central Brooks Range is one of rapid decline, and these changes are of increased significance to the high alpine hydrology and ecology of Gates of the Arctic. Results of research will help archaeologists continue to target field survey areas, as well as address the impacts that these changes are having on park natural resources. a large patch of snow near the top of a rocky mountain Lichens of the Arctic Because certain lichen species are both abundant and sensitive to changes in the environment, they can serve as useful indicators of ecosystem health. When exposed to even low levels of certain pollutants, particularly sensitive species will decline or die, making lichen community composition a good indicator. closeup of green colored lichen Adam Freeburg - Archaeologist Adam Freeburg is an archaeologist for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. An archaeologist hikes a ridgeline to a survey site in the Yukon-Tanana uplands. Kyle Joly - Wildlife Biologist Kyle Joly is a wildlife biologist in Alaska. He works with the Arctic Inventory and Monitoring Network, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Wildlife biologist Kyle Joly with a young caribou. Mathew Sorum - Wildlife Biologist Mathew Sorum is a wildlife biologist for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Mat rows a raft across an Arctic lake. The 19th Amendment, Elizabeth Peratrovich, and the Ongoing Fight for Equal Rights In Alaska, women's suffrage passed in 1913—seven years prior to the 19th Amendment—and antidiscrimination legislation passed nearly 20 years prior to the major national civil rights bills of the 1960s. In the 1940s, Elizabeth Peratrovich—a Tlingit woman who was Grand President of the Alaska Native Sisterhood—led the charge to end discrimination against Alaska Natives. gold coin of a raven, a woman's face, and words elizabeth peratrovich anti-discrimination law Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 16 Issue: Science in Alaska's Arctic Parks The National Park Service manages five parks that fall partially or entirely within the Arctic tundra biome. These five parks encompass 19.3 million acres of land and constitute approximately 25% of the land area managed by the National Park Service nationwide. These are undeveloped places, with free-flowing rivers and wilderness at a massive scale. a group of muskox running across a field Series: Dall Sheep in Alaska's National Parks Discover the importance of Dall Sheep in Alaska's National Parks Two sheep rest on a snowy mountain Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 12 Issue 2: Climate Change in Alaska's National Parks In this issue: * Status and Trends of Alaska National Park Glaciers * Tracking Glacial Landscapes: High School Science Gets Real * Climate Change Scenario Planning Lessons from Alaska a hillside overlooking a wide valley filled by a glacier, surrounded by steep mountains Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 2: Mineral and Energy Development There’s no denying that energy and mineral extraction have been and will continue to be important across the North for a long time. Mining and energy-related industries provide direct and indirect employment for thousands of people, taxes and other revenues. Our need is for science, engineering, and scholarly research; to develop safe, effective, and affordable technologies; to protect, preserve, and restore the natural and human environment; and to record and communicate our history. aerial view of buildings and a pier sticking out into the ocean Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 1: Wilderness in Alaska This issue includes: * Economics of Wilderness * Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness * Busing Through the Wilderness: "Near-Wilderness" Experiences in Denali ... and more! mountains reflecting into a calm lake, the words 'alaska park science' Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Copper River Basin Symposium - Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve February 2020: With a theme of Tradition, Science, and Stewardship, the two-day symposium included keynote speakers, 26 short presentations, and a poster session. A panel discussion delved into opportunities in working with indigenous communities. Ahtna elders provided wisdom in daily welcomes, and there was a presentation by Copper River Stewardship Youth. Topics ranged widely from fisheries to archaeology to geology. As well as sharing knowledge, participants shared meals, stories, and ideas. Copper River Basin Symposium logo by Lindsay and Elvie Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 19, Issue 1 - Below the Surface: Fish and Our Changing Underwater World Alaska has over three million lakes, 12,000 rivers, and an estimated 6,640 miles of ocean coastline. Below the surface swim some of the world’s most abundant, healthy, all-wild fish, including salmon, halibut, and eulachon. Fish sustained Alaska Natives for millennia and continue to represent food and economic security for many people. Alaska Park Science 19(1): 2020 Red-colored salmon swim in turquoise water. Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 14 Issue 2: Birds of Alaska's National Parks This issue includes articles exploring birds throughout national parks in Alaska. Particular emphasis is on the changing ways to study birds, and the increasing importance not just on the summer homes of birds in Alaska, but the routes between their wintering and summer breeding grounds. a great horned own and two large owlets in a nest Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 9 Issue 1: Monitoring the "Vital Signs" of Healthy Park Ecosystems This issue explores the "vital signs" of parks. The National Park Service's Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Network studies broad ecological trends throughout parks, and uses those trends, or vital signs, to gauge the health of a park's ecosystem. man standing in a shallow creek Series: Alaska Park Science- Volume 8 Issue 1: Connections to Natural and Cultural Resource Studies in Alaska's National Parks This issue of Alaska Park Science explores natural and cultural studies in Alaska's National Parks. Theses studies cover a variety of topics including wildlife management, archaeology, permafrost, sustainable energy, and interviews with two researchers from the Cooperative Park Studies Unit. Aurora over Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park and Skagway, Alaska. Brown bear population size and harvest in Northwest Alaska Read a summary and get the link to a paper published in the Journal of Wildlife Management on brown bear population trends in northwest Alaska: Schmidt, J. H., H. L. Robison, L. S. Parrett, T. S. Gorn, and B. S. Shults. 2021. Brown bear density and estimated harvest rates in northwestern Alaska. The Journal of Wildlife Management 85(2): 202-214. Aerial view of brown bears crossing a snow field in the Brooks Range. Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Fire Extent and Frequency Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Fire affects all 5 parks within the Arctic Network. The first fires in the network were officially recorded in 1956, although the history of fire in these parks, based on charcoal records dates back to at least 6,000 years ago. Since 1956, 574 fires have occurred in Arctic Network parks, burning nearly 1.1 million acres, an area almost twice the size of Cape Krusenstern National Monument. The vast majority of these fires (97%) were started by lightning. Fire ecologist measures depth of soil consumption in tussocks 1 year after a recent fire in Noatak. Fire in Ecosystems: Boreal Forest The boreal forest, also called taiga, is the largest forested habitat in the world, making up one third of the earth’s total forested area. In North America, the boreal forest spreads from Alaska, across Canada, and into the Great Lakes region of the United States. Boreal forests have burned naturally for thousands of years creating a variety of landscapes, or mosaic, with young and old trees living on the landscape. Aerial view of flaming front in coniferous trees putting off a lot of smoke. Repeat Photography: A Visually Compelling Tool for Documenting Natural Resource Change Repeat photography is an effective method to qualitatively and quantitatively assess landscape change over time. From shrinking glaciers to changing vegetation to changes in the built environment, comparing historical and contemporary photos can help us identify specific features or processes that may require more intensive monitoring and research and can serve as a valuable tool for education, outreach, and resource management. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A historic photo overlaid on a modern image. Series: Alaska Park Science Volume 20 Issue 1 - Parks as Proving Grounds Parks in Alaska pose special challenges to researchers: they are large, remote, and less is known about them. This makes it all the more important that tools and techniques we use here are practical, effective, and impactful. While researchers often focus on sharing the findings from their work, here we shine a light on the devices and approaches used by researchers with attention to the innovation needed to work in Alaska. Alaska Park Science 20 (1), 2021 A scientist uses a probe on the top of a mountain. Dall's Sheep Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Dall’s sheep are an alpine adapted species at their northernmost extent in the Brooks Range of Alaska. GAAR and NOAT encompass most of the available habitat in the central and western Brooks Range and were estimated in the 1980’s to contain 13-15% of the world’s Dall’s sheep. Dall’s sheep are an important subsistence species for local residents and highly valued where sport hunting is permitted in preserves. A Dall's sheep ram close up image Brown Bear Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Alaska has more than 50% of the remaining North American brown bears and the second largest population worldwide. Parks in the Arctic Inventory and Monitoring Network may ultimately provide a refuge for brown bears in northwest Alaska that are adapted to life in the Arctic, but strong monitoring programs are needed to understand whether these bear populations can remain healthy in a rapidly changing Arctic. A brown bear sits in a tundra wetland. Bumble Bees of Alaska: A Field Guide This field guide to bumble bees will help you identify these abundant and conspicuous pollinators, which are found across most of Alaska. They are well-adapted to cold, harsh climates and live in every habitat where there are flowers offering up pollen and nectar, including forests, shrublands, tundra, wetlands, riparian areas, beaches, and gardens. a bumble bee perched on tiny pink flowers The Long Walk: The Origins of Anaktuvuk Pass The time is early summer 1949, at Sulupaat, a camp near the mouth of April Creek in the Killik River valley. There, the families of Maptigaq Morry, Inualuuraq Hugo, Homer Mekiana, and their children and grandchildren are prepared to set out on The Long Walk. It would be more than a two week long overland dog-packing trek, as the Killik families made their way eastward to join another small group of families at Tulugaq Lake, nearly a hundred miles distant. Justus Mekiana walking with a group of dogs wearing dog-packs Nunamiut Caribou Skin Clothing and Tents Inland mountain Eskimos experience one of the world’s most extreme winter climates—temperatures of 55 degrees below zero or colder, often with gale force winds and blinding snow. Despite these daunting conditions, Eskimo people carry on with their daily life of hunting, fishing, gathering firewood, traveling, and camping. The key to their success and survival—above all else—is warm, effective, brilliantly designed and expertly made clothing. Nunamiut ice fisherman wearing caribou skin parka, pants, and boots Nunamiut: The Caribou People In Northern Alaska, people and caribou have lived in a close, intricate relationship for at least 11,000 years. Caribou have been vitally important for the survival of all native people whose homelands are now partially encompassed by Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve. For some tribes, caribou is just part of a diet which also includes other game, fish and marine mammals. But for the Nunamiut Eskimos, caribou is by far the single most important food source. 1967 Simon Paneak drawing of a hunter in a qayaq spearing caribou as they cross a river What a mammoth's tusk can tell us about its life Where did woolly mammoths roam when they lived in Beringia? What can learning about their movements tell us about their lives and their extinction? Read more here: Wooller, M. J., C. Bataille, P. Druckenmiller, G. M. Erickson, P. Groves, N. Haubenstock, T. Howe, J. Irrgeher, D. Mann, K. Moon, B. A. Potter, T. Prohaska, J. Rasic, J. Reuther, B. Shapiro, K. J. Spaleta, and A. D. Willis. 2021. Lifetime mobility of an Arctic woolly mammoth. Science 373(6556): 806-808. Two woolly mammoths walk across Beringia. Stream Communities & Ecosystems Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Stream flow has changed in recent decades at monitoring sites near the Arctic Network. The timing of peak discharge during spring snowmelt now occurs nearly 10 days earlier than it did 30 years ago. The Kobuk River is now re-freezing later in fall than it did in the 1980s. In headwater streams of the Arctic Network, permafrost thaw is changing watershed hydrology, causing streams to cool and discharge to decline during summer months. Aerial image of a Braided river in Alaska’s Arctic Network with mountains in background How do caribou decide when to migrate in the fall? Read a summary and link to a published paper that describes the factors that determine caribou fall migration. Cameron, M. D., J. M. Eisaguirre, G. A. Breed, K. Joly, and K. Kielland. 2021. Mechanistic movement models identify continuously updated autumn migration cues in Arctic caribou. Movement Ecology 9(54): 12 pp. Caribou running through tundra in the fall. A Wilderness Treasure Hunt Unlocks Caribou Secrets Two rangers retrieve a GPS collar from an animal in the backcountry, helping biologists learn about the animal’s movements. Backcountry ranger Taylor Bracher holds up GPS collar Arctic Summers are Getting Longer Read a summary and get the link to an article that describes how the Arctic is getting greener: Swanson, D. K. 2021. Start of the green season and normalized difference vegetation index in Alaska's Arctic national parks. Remote Sensing 13(13): 2554. A muskox naps in the tundra. Terrestrial Landscape Dynamics Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Landscape dynamics are the “big picture” of changes in the growing season, vegetation, and surface water. The timing of the start and end of the growing season and snow-free season varies by about a month from year-to-year. The area of lakes and ponds has declined in the northern coastal plain of Bering Land Bridge NP, from about 8.5% of the land surface area in 2000 to less less than 7% by 2019. Tall shrubs are expanding their range and getting denser in some areas. Muskox lying on tundra with a mountain in the background under overcast sky Terrestrial Vegetation and Soils Resource Brief for the Arctic Network Vegetation is the basis for ecosystem productivity and wildlife habitat. Arctic vegetation is very sensitive to climate change and disturbance such as fire, herbivory, and traffic. Research has documented an increase in shrubs and, to a lesser extent, trees in the arctic over recent decades, probably related to climate change. Major changes in vegetation structure such as these have a cascading effect on other ecosystem attributes. scientists measure the cover of plants on the tundra along a tape measure

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