"Glen Canyon National Recreation Area - Lake Powell - Reflection Canyon" by NPS Photo/Gary Ladd , public domain

Glen Canyon

National Recreation Area - AZ, UT

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is a recreation and conservation unit of the National Park Service that encompasses the area around Lake Powell and lower Cataract Canyon in Utah and Arizona, covering 1,254,429 acres of mostly desert.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glen Canyon - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Arizona Strip Visitor Map with recreational information for the Arizona Strip, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (NM), Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), and surrounding areas (Grand Canyon, North Kaibab National Forest, etc). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Arizona Strip - East

Arizona Strip Visitor Map with recreational information for the Arizona Strip, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (NM), Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), and surrounding areas (Grand Canyon, North Kaibab National Forest, etc). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Coconino County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Coconino County

Coconino County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map (southern part) of the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Moab - Visitor Map - South

Visitor Map (southern part) of the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Hole in the Rock Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Hole in the Rock

Map of Hole in the Rock Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fremont River Ranger District (Teasdale Portion) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Fishlake MVTM - Fremont River Teasdale Portion 2020

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fremont River Ranger District (Teasdale Portion) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fremont River Ranger District (North) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Fishlake MVTM - Fremont River North 2020

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fremont River Ranger District (North) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

https://www.nps.gov/glca https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_Canyon_National_Recreation_Area Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is a recreation and conservation unit of the National Park Service that encompasses the area around Lake Powell and lower Cataract Canyon in Utah and Arizona, covering 1,254,429 acres of mostly desert. Encompassing over 1.25 million acres, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area offers unparalleled opportunities for water-based & backcountry recreation. The recreation area stretches for hundreds of miles from Lees Ferry in Arizona to the Orange Cliffs of southern Utah, encompassing scenic vistas, geologic wonders, and a vast panorama of human history. There are multiple districts in Glen Canyon very far away from each other. Avoid a two hundred mile detour and make sure you know which district you are going to before you begin travelling here. Bullfrog Visitor Center Open seasonally. Exhibits relating to geology and the human and natural history of Glen Canyon, including a life-size model of a slot canyon! Ancestral Puebloan and pioneer artifacts. Bookstore, restrooms. Located in the same building as the emergency medical clinic. Located approximately 100 miles south of Interstate 70, just north of the launch ramp on Hwy 276. Carl Hayden Visitor Center Main visitor center for Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument. Currently closed due to COVID-19. During this closure, for park information and trip planning, visit our partner Glen Canyon Conservancy's Flagship office at 12 North Lake Powell Boulevard, Page, Arizona 86040 On Highway 89 two miles north of Page, AZ, across the Glen Canyon Bridge. Building is attached to Glen Canyon Dam. Escalante Interagency Visitor Center This center is jointly run by Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (Bureau of Land Management), Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (National Park Service), and Dixie National Forest (National Forest Service). It features outdoor exhibits focusing on trip planning and interior exhibits on the scientific research surrounding the Escalante region. Permits for hikes into Glen Canyon Wilderness must be obtained here in person. Call ahead for permit status and road conditions. 435-826-5499. Off State Highway 12 at 155 W Main in Escalante, UT Glen Canyon Conservancy Flagship An official visitor center for the state of Arizona, and acting as Glen Canyon's main visitor center while others are closed for COVID, the Flagship office and retail store is a great place to start your Glen Canyon adventure. Our friend and partners Glen Canyon Conservancy offer the historic big relief map that originally anchored the Carl Hayden Visitor Center. Let the knowledgeable staff help you plan your trip, browse the retail store for books, maps, and gear that you'll need during your visit. From US Highway 89, turn onto North Lake Powell Boulevard. In one mile, the Flagship will be on your right. If you go through the intersection of Lake Powell Blvd and North Navajo Street, you have gone too far. Navajo Bridge Interpretive Center Bookstore, outdoor exhibits, and self guided walks across the historic Navajo Bridge. This is a popular spot to look for California Condors. US Highway 89A in Marble Canyon, AZ. On the west side of Navajo Bridge. Beehives Campground 6 designated sites. Across from Wahweap South Entrance. Picnic table at each site. No hookups, dump station, or restrooms. Pack it in, pack it out. Portable toilets required. No campfires or glass containers. No reservations. $14 per night. Three night camping limit. Beehive Campground fees 14.00 $14 per site per night. Limit 3 nights. Beehive Campground 1 Primitive campground with regulation sign. RV The Beehive campground has six sites and no amenities. Beehive campground 2 Six campsites on dirt grounds with sandstone cliffs above. With no amenities at the Beehive campground, campers must pack out what they bring in. Beehive campground 3 Two RVs and a black truck on rugged road. Mountain and cliffs in background. A quick hike up the beehives gets you a pretty good view of the small campground and the iconic scenery. Bullfrog RV & Campground This campground is located in the Bullfrog developed area and is operated by Lake Powell Resorts & Marinas. 78 sites, restroom, phones, dump station, potable water station, ½ mile to laundry, store, post office, launch ramp. No reservations. Fees apply. The concessioner also operates a separate RV park with 24 sites, full hook-ups, restrooms, showers, and 1/2 mile to laundry, store, post office, launch ramp. For reservations visit www.lakepowell.com or call 800-528-6154. Fees apply. RV site 46.00 Per night. National Park Service entrance fee not included. All are full hook-ups sites with water, sewer and 30 amp power. They can accommodate up to 50 ft. Tent sites. 26.00 Per night. National Park Service entrance fee not included. No hookups. Bullfrog RV Park 1 Gravel road with camping sites that have picnic tables, grills, hookups, two RVs You don't need a boat to enjoy camping at Bullfrog. Bullfrog RV Park 2 paved camping spot with picnic table, grill, and tree. Pull right into a spot at the Bullfrog campground. Bullfrog RV Park 3 Paved pullout with picnic table and grill, some trees. Pull into a dry camping site with some tree cover. Colorado River Primitive Camping Between Glen Canyon Dam and Lees Ferry Along the fifteen mile stretch of the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and Lees Ferry, there are five primitive beaches set aside for camping, marked with signs, on a first-come, first-served basis. Camping is permitted in these areas only, as they are provided with toilets and fire pits. These sites can only be accessed by small vessel. All campsites are located well above the river and require a short walk from your boat. This is to prevent camps from being damaged by high water releases. Lees Ferry Upriver Camping 0.00 If you have already paid the park entrance fee and the boating fee, there are no additional charges. Lees Ferry Upriver Camping - Ferry Swale River beach with shrubs and vault toilet Ferry Swale is one of five designated camping sites upriver of Lees Ferry Lees Ferry Upriver Camping - Ferry Swale View Canyon wall from river level Ferry Swale is an easy landmark to help find the camp site Lees Ferry Upriver Camping - River River in deep sandstone canyon The view is pretty nice when you motor or paddle up to one of the designated camping sites Halls Crossing RV & Campground With Halls Crossing RV Park & Campground, you're just steps from food, fun, and the Village Store. It's easy to get to Halls Crossing. Simply ride the ferry located at Bullfrog Marina and Halls Crossing, it's just a short ride away. Stop by the Village Store to check-in - and don't forget to pick up food and beverages while you are there. Halls Crossing - Concessioner RV and Camping 100.00 This campground is not operated by the National Park Service. make your reservation at www.lakepowell.com Hite Outpost Adventure Center Hite is a remote Ranger District located at the top of Lake Powell, adjacent to the confluence of the Colorado and Dirty Devil Rivers. Primitive camping is available in various spots. The Hite Outpost is operated by Ticaboo Lodge. They offer developed camping for tents and RVs. Hite Primitive (Dirty Devil, Farley, White Canyon) camping Designated primitive camping areas that are accessible by vehicle and sometimes by vessel as well. First-come first served, no reservations. No designated sites. No potable water. When pit toilets are unavailable, campers must bring portable toilets for use and proper disposal into the sewer system. Quiet hours 10pm-6am. $12 per night. Camping Fee 12.00 Per vehicle per night Farley Canyon Three people and a vehicle at the base of a large sandstone butte Farley Canyon Dirty Devil Camping Sandy landscape with cliffs in distance Dirty Devil Camping Area Lees Ferry Campground 54 designated sites. No hookups. RV dump station. Grills provided, no open fires. Quiet time 10pm-6am. Modern bathroom/comfort station, potable water available, launch ramp 2 miles. Gas and supply store at Marble Canyon, about 5 miles away. No reservations. $20 per site/per night. Lees Ferry Campground fees 20.00 54 designated sites. No hookups. RV dump station. Grills provided, no open fires. Quiet time 10pm-6am. Modern bathroom/comfort station, potable water available, launch ramp 2 miles. Gas and supply store at Marble Canyon, about 5 miles away. No reservations. $20 per site/per night. Lees Ferry Campground 1 Dome tent and campsite overlooking river and sandstone cliffs Enjoy the view of the Colorado River at Lees Ferry Campground Lees Ferry Campground 2 Row of curved shade structures at campsites, RV in background Plenty of room for you and your neighbors at the Lees Ferry campground Lees Ferry Campground 3 Tent and shade structure. One small tree. Campsites at Lees Ferry come with shade shelters. Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area Primitive camping is on a sandy beach or in dunes. No designated campsites. Open fires permitted, must be within four foot squared area. Quiet time 10pm-6am. 4 micro flush toilets, 6 vault toilets, 1 comfort station/wheelchair accessible, outdoor cold shower, Off Road Vehicle area, dump station, potable water (seasonal), and day use area. No launch ramp. $14 per vehicle/per night in addition to entry fees. No reservations. Overnight camping at Lone Rock Beach - per vehicle per night - this is in addition to entrance fees 14.00 Primitive camping is on a sandy beach or in dunes. No designated campsites. Open fires permitted, must be within four foot squared area. Quiet time 10pm-6am. 4 micro flush toilets, 6 vault toilets, 1 comfort station/wheelchair accessible, outdoor cold shower, Off Road Vehicle area, dump station, potable water (seasonal), and day use area. No launch ramp. $14 per vehicle/per night in addition to entrance fees. No reservations. Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping - Tent Two people sit in beach chairs in front of a tent pitched on a beach near the water's edge. Pitch your tent wherever you want at Lone Rock Beach. Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping - Trailer Airstream camper and beach chairs on beach next to lake and sandstone cliffs Park yourself for a few nights on the beach at Lone Rock Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping - Recreational Vehicle RV with group of people smiling in front The whole family can enjoy the beach camping at Lone Rock. Stanton Creek Primitive Camping Area Designated primitive camping areas that are accessible by vehicle and sometimes by vessel as well. First-come first served, no reservations. No designated sites. No potable water. When pit toilets are unavailable, campers must bring portable toilets for use and proper disposal into the sewer system. Lake Powell Primitive Camping Areas Fees 12.00 Fees for Stanton Creek, Hite, Dirty Devil, and Farley Canyon Wahweap Campground & RV Park 112 dry campsites (no hook-ups), 90 full hook-ups, and 6 group camping sites. Facilities include restrooms, laundry, showers, store, phones, dump station and potable water. The amphitheater, picnic area and swim beach are nearby. To make reservations for full hook-ups, group or dry camping please visit www.lakepowell.com or call 800-528-6154. The Wahweap camping store is 928-645-1059. Fees vary. Wahweap RV Park and Campground Row of multicolored recreational vehicles separated by trees and pavement. Room for everyone at the Wahweap RV park. Wahweap Campground Two tents with picnic tables and grills. Lake Powell in background. Even without a boat, you can camp with a view of the lake. Different vehicles at Wahweap campground. Colorful van, truck towing a boat. lake Powell in background. There's room to pull your boat into your camping spot. Enjoy Lake Powell Woman raises her arms while standing in front of a sandstone butte Spending time on Lake Powell near Tower Butte can make anyone excited. Horseshoe Bend Green river winds through high cliffs. The Colorado River makes a 270 degree turn at Horseshoe Bend. Watch your step at the 1000 foot drop! Glen Canyon Dam A concrete dam plugs high canyon walls. Buildings and wires on the sides. Glen Canyon Dam is the country's second largest gravity arch dam. Take a tour from the Carl Hayden Visitor Center. So Many Ways to Find Your Park Three kayaks on the lake. If motorized recreation isn't your thing, take a kayak and paddle through the high side canyons of Lake Powell. Lonely Dell Ranch at Lees Ferry Historic District Log cabin and fences with a wooden wagon. Glen Canyon isn't just houseboats and wakeboards. Come down to Lees Ferry Historic District to relive pioneer times when crossing the river was a major undertaking. Planning for the Future of the Dragonfly Mercury Project Article on the 2019 Dragonfly Mercury Project steering committee meeting at Rocky Mountain National Park. People searching a pond with nets. Crystal Clear: Evaluating Water and Sediment Contamination and Accumulation in Biota During 2004 a total of 20 sampling sites were established at various locations such as marinas, inflow areas, and selected high-use sites. Preliminary results indicated that between 2004 and 2006 contaminants increased. These results provided baseline information for long-term monitoring and to document change over time. canyon image reflected in water California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. Structural Fire Awards Presented to Parks and Firefighters for Excellence in Service In 2013 the NPS Office of Structural Fire presented awards to those parks and individuals who have made a difference over the past year in furthering the structural fire program agencywide. Article identifies recipients of Superior Achievement Award, Compliance Achievement Award, Outstanding Fire Instructor of the Year award, and Leadership Awards. Structural Fire Training Incorporates Operational Leadership Operational leadership has been integrated into the NPS Structural Firefighting Training Academy. Nearly all park fire departments need to work independently, because outside fire departments can take more than 30 minutes to respond. Each department must do everything possible to reduce hazards of the job. The academy has long seen the importance of incorporating safety initiatives and measures into its training curriculum. Archeology and Industry: Gold Mining in Glen Canyon During the early 20th-century Colorado River Gold Rush, many entrepreneurs such as Charles Spencer tried their luck with various mining ventures. Archeologists studied the remains of Spencer's mining camp and steamboat wreck to understand more about this short-lived industry. Spencer’s crew in front of Lee’s Ferry fort. Bat Projects in Parks: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area A group of youths teamed up to monitor bats in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. See what they found! A youth looks on a device to locate bats by their calls NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Arizona and Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] river in entrenched meander PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space SW CA Condor Update - 2013-01 (January) From January 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Learning the Basics, Part 3 Follow two park rangers as they attend the NPS national structural fire training. On days 4 and 5 exhaustion set in. The trainees soldiered through practice moving with low or no visibility while wearing their self-contained breathing apparatus, calling mayday in the face of an emergency, moving an injured colleague out of danger, knot tying, and breaking up cars to extricate passengers. fire training with shipping container fires Learning the Basics, Part 4 Follow two park rangers as they attend the NPS national structural fire training. On days 6-9, trainees witnessed a controlled live burn inside a shipping container to experience the heat and smoke and learn about how fire moves, and learned about using existing sprinkler systems, precautions and firefighting techniques for compressed natural gas fires and liquefied gas, and extinguishing vehicle fires and removing occupants. vehicle fire training Learning the Basics, Part 5 Follow 2 trainees at NPS structural fire training. On day 10 they fought real fire in a containerized setting. They practiced attacking the fire in different ways with different hose patterns. They learned how to hydraulically vent a room and help reduce the fire. They reflect on what they learned and how it changed them. The Service's structural fire suppression training program was formally accredited through the National Board on Fire Service Professional Qualifications. Structural Fire Training Learning the Basics, Part 1 Follow two park rangers as they attend the NPS national structural fire training. On day 1, they learn how to don their protective gear quickly and correctly. Later they must practice locating a downed firefighter while having no visibility and following a hose line. aerial view of glen canyon and fire engine trucks Learning the Basics, Part 2 Follow two park rangers as they attend the NPS national structural fire training. On days 2 and 3 they learned about fire mechanics and hoses--how to roll them, lay them, move them, and operate them. They also faced their first training scenario. fire training with fire hoses Evaluating Water and Sediment Contamination and Accumulation in Biota The National Park Service and US Geological Survey work together in researching the different types of contaminants that may arrive at Lake Powell, and how to address them. Being a remote location, contaminants are not as much of a problem as some other areas. Keeping Glen Canyon Crystal Clear is an NPS Centennial Call to Action. Boat with scientific equipment. People in lifejackets use the equipment. Increasing temperature seasonality may overwhelm shifts in soil moisture to favor shrub over grass dominance in Colorado Plateau drylands Increasing variability of temperature favors a shift to shrublands over grasslands in arid southwestern landscapes. This effect is greater than the effect of increasing soil moisture, which favors a shift to grasslands over shrublands. Grassland with scattered junipers and hills in the background. Learning the Basics, Part 4-new This is the fourth in a series about two structural fire academy candidates, Brandon Penrose and David Robinson, park rangers from Grand Canyon National Park. Their stories have been blended together. As day eight of the structural fire academy comes to a close, more and more of what the instructors are teaching us is coming together out on the proving grounds. Bat Monitoring at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area At a time when bat populations are at a greater risk of extinction, the National Park Service has a strategic role to play in continent-wide bat conservation. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is participating in the North American Bat Monitoring Program, conducting acoustic surveys and netting bats throughout the park. In addition, park scientists are involving youth in bat monitoring projects and bringing bat science to the public by hosting annual bat festivals. Pallid bad looking at its photographer California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. John Doyle Lee In 1870, following his excommunication from the Church of Latter Day Saints, John D. Lee settled in the canyonlands of northern Arizona. He and his wives established a ferry service along the Colorado River and developed a ranch to make the harsh and arid landscape more habitable. The ferry site played a prominent role in the exploration and settlement of northern Arizona. Portrait of a man in a dark, brimmed hat and polka-dot tie 2011 SCPN-NAU Student Projects In spring 2011, the SCPN-NAU School of Communication collaboration began with a multimedia studies course focused on documenting park resources and resource projects. The class was taught by NAU professors Laura Camden and Peter Friederici. 2011 Student Projects The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument Noise Model of Lake Powell Noise models are effective tools for showing how noise distributes across park landscapes. Scientists in the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division created a noise map of Lake Powell at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Utah that shows the distribution and duration of aircraft noise above Lake Powell. Map shows Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Lake Powell, and surrounding Navajo Indian lands. 3 Ways to Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act July 18, 2018, we celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a special piece of legislation that curbed the drastic decline of birds in North America. A bald eagle gliding over the Chesapeake Bay. Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation and soils are the foundation upon which all terrestrial ecosystems are built. Soils provide the medium for the storage and delivery of water and nutrients to plants, which in turn provide animal populations with both habitat and food. Sampling grassland vegetation at a long-term monitoring plot at Wupatki National Monument Modeling Past and Future Soil Moisture in Southern Colorado Plateau National Parks and Monuments In this project, USGS and NPS scientists used the range of variation in historical climate data to provide context for assessing the relative impact of projected future climate on soil water availability. This report provides the results of modeled SWP generated for 11 ecosystems in nine Southern Colorado Plateau Network parks. Extensive grassland at Wupatki National Monument Monitoring Night Skies and Natural Soundscapes on the Southern Colorado Plateau Many national parks in the Southern Colorado Plateau region contain large areas of wilderness, where dark night skies and natural soundscapes are important human values. Dark night skies, which depend upon the visibility of stars and other natural components, are diminishing resources in several park units because of anthropogenic activities. Natural soundscapes—that is, the natural sounds of wildlands—are degraded by sounds caused by humans or human technology. Clouds and sky turning red and orange over Navajo National Monument at sunset Young Paleontologist Helps to Uncover the Fossil Record at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area If you’re looking for one of the most complete sections of geologic strata of the Mesozoic Era, then you must visit Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. My name is Maria Rodriguez and I am a physical science technician in GLCA. With its 1.2 million acres, Glen Canyon NRA houses a rare and valuable geological history. My work focuses mainly on vertebrate ichnology, or “fossil footprints”. young woman in foreground with trays of rock slates on shelves in background SW CA Condor Update - 2017-01 (January) From January 2017: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-11 (November) From November 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-02 (February) From February 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-11 (November) From November 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-07 (July) From July 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2016-04 (April) From April 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-07 (July) From July 2014 : An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2019-09 (September) An update on the Southwest California Condor Meta-Population for September 2019 from Grand Canyon National Park. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2017-04 (April) An update on the status of the Arizona/ Utah population of the California condor. A condor flying. Veteran Story: John Pflaumer John Pflaumer is the Education and Outreach Coordinator at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Ranger holding child scissors Volunteer Story: Brent and Dawn Davis Brent and Dawn Davis have been volunteer photographers for Glen Canyon and Rainbow Bridge since 2018. Night photo of round sandstone arch and starry sky Triassic Tracks in the Moenkopi Formation In-depth article about Triassic tracks in the Moenkopi Formation found in Capitol Reef National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Raised lines indicating three toed animal tracks in tan rock, with permanent marker for scale. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. World CA Condor Update - 2018 An update on the world California Condor population for 2018. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2016 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2016. A close up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2017 An update on the world California Condor population for 2017. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-03 (March) From March 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-10 (October) From October 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW Ca Condor Update - 2013-04 (April) From April 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-07 (July) From July 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2018-04 (April) Update on the AZ/UT population of California condors in April of 2018. A condor flying wild and free. World CA Condor Update – 2019 An update on the world California Condor population for 2019. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update – 2020-02 An update on the Southwest California Condor Meta-Population for 2019 from Grand Canyon National Park (updated February 2020). A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-06 (June) From June 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-04 (April) From April 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-07 (July) From July 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Coloring Glen Canyon Glen Canyon coloring pages. Image is a page like the ones in the coloring book. Download all ten in pdf format for coloring activities. Line drawn image intended for coloring The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Southwest River Environments In the arid Southwest, water means life, and prehistorically, rivers were the lifelines of the people. The Colorado River flowing through a canyon Monitoring Water Quality on the Southern Colorado Plateau Water quality data are used to characterize waters, detect trends over time, and identify emerging problems. In Southern Colorado Plateau Network parks, water quality is monitored as an indicator of aquatic ecosystem integrity, as a component of watershed condition, and to document water quality conditions in relation to state and federal regulations. Collecting water quality data Climate Change on the Southern Colorado Plateau The combination of high. elevation and a semi-arid climate makes the Colorado Plateau particularly vulnerable to climate change. Climate models predict that over the next 100 years, the Southwest will become warmer and even more arid, with more extreme droughts than the region has experienced in the recent past. One result of climate change may be more, larger floods, like this flash flood in Glen Canyon NRA Monitoring Spring Ecosystems on the Southern Colorado Plateau Springs are important water sources in arid landscapes, supporting unique plant associations and sustaining high levels of biotic diversity. Because springs rely on groundwater, they can serve as important indicators of change in local and regional aquifers. On the Colorado Plateau, spring ecosystems also provide vital habitat for both endemic and regionally rare species, including several types of orchids and declining populations of leopard frogs. A pool of water filled with vegetation and sheltered by large rocks First Time at Lake Powell 2020 Are you ready for your first boat trip on Lake Powell? Is your boat ready for the quagga mussels? A helpful ranger at the top of the launch ramp will let you know what you need to to to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species. Park Ranger with clipboard talks to vehicle at the top of a launch ramp. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings: California Condor Management During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. This article is from a transcript of a June 5, 2019 briefing about California condor management in Grand Canyon. Its conversational quality reflects the passion and personalities of the people behind the park. A black bird with its wings out sits perched on a tan rock, with a numbered tag visible on its wing. Series: Structural Firefighting Academy Structural firefighters have to learn to make split-second decisions while surrounded by flames, feeling the heat through their protective gear, while carrying heavy loads and wearing breathing apparatus. They must learn to remain calm, quickly assess injuries and impending disaster, and respond constructively to many kinds of scenarios. The training builds self-confidence and helps rangers be more effective and versatile in their home parks. structural fire training at Grand Canyon National Park Series: Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. Black winged California Condor with a red head sits with its wings spread out. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring 2018 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology News</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> a piece of rock with small reddish shells embedded in it with black and white rule in foreground Series: SCPN-NAU School of Communication Collaboration The Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN) of the National Park Service has been partnering with the Northern Arizona University (NAU) School of Communication since 2011 to develop student multimedia projects that highlight resources and activities in network parks. This collaboration gives NAU students hands-on experience in creating multimedia projects and provides network parks with products that can help to promote their unique resources and scientific or educational project work. SCPN-NAU student projects Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Triassic Period—251.9 to 201.3 MYA The brightly colored Triassic rocks of Petrified Forest National Park yield not only the petrified trees but many other plant and animal fossils. fossil footprint on stone Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Ranger Edmonia-Making Your Own History For Black History Month 2021, Ranger Edmonia shares her experience of trying to find her place in the history of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Park Ranger drives a boat with the sun at her back Kat Smail - Range Technician Range Technician Kat Smail tells us about her roles as a scientist in the National Park Service for International Women's Day. Park ranger holding stick World CA Condor Update – 2020 An update on the world California Condor population for 2020, compiled by our partners at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as of December 31, 2020. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. Condition of Glen Canyon's Tributary Rivers and Associated Resources: Park Conditions Summary 2021 Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is home to unique flora and fauna that make their home in smaller water sources and tributaries to the Colorado River and Lake Powell. This project assesses conditions of springs and seeps, fishes, tinajas, amphibians, and riparian zones in these areas and identifies drivers and stressors influencing their condition. Man sitting on red sandstone rock outcrop above Farley Canyon, with blue skies and red rock canyons. Small water, big impact: Assessing the health of springs, seeps, and hanging gardens Glen Canyon National Recreation Area: Springs and seeps connect groundwater to the surface that plants and animals rely on throughout the desert. The Natural Resource Condition Assessment program partnered with Utah State University to evaluate the condition of springs and seeps and to identify data gaps. Find out how springs and seeps are doing at Glen Canyon and what threatens them. Lush green vegetation around a spring Amphibians in the Desert Glen Canyon National Recreation Area: Although Lake Powell is one of the largest reservoirs in the U.S., not far from the lake shore is a very different and dry landscape. Amphibians, with their moist skin, must stay hydrated or they can die from desiccation. How difficult is it for amphibians to survive in the hot, arid environment that includes Glen Canyon NRA? How are amphibians doing at the national recreation area today? Read this article to learn more. Spotted frog swimming in a pond in Brown's Canyon Series: NRCA Park Conditions Summary 2021: Condition of Glen Canyon's Tributary Rivers and Associated Resources Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is home to unique flora and fauna that make their home in smaller water sources and tributaries to the Colorado River and Lake Powell. This project assesses conditions of springs and seeps, fishes, tinajas, amphibians, and riparian zones in these areas and identifies drivers and stressors influencing their condition. Red sandstone with eroded pockets filled with rainwater under a cloudy sky. Native Fish in Glen Canyon’s Tributary Rivers Glen Canyon National Recreation Area: Fish are an important part of aquatic ecosystems. They are an integral part of food webs; some are herbivores and others are carnivores. Nearly 30 species of fish inhabit the waters of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. However, only eight of these species are native. Of the eight native fish species in Glen Canyon, four are listed as Endangered Species, and four are part of a conservation/management effort by local states. Lake Powell Brent_and_Dawn_Davis Citizen-based Acoustic Bat Monitoring Along the Colorado and San Juan Rivers The rise of urgent environmental issues in National Parks has led resource managers to pursue citizen-based research projects to aid in the collection of scientific data. From 2016–2018, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area partnered with Grand Canyon Youth river guides and other organizations to collect data on the distribution of bat species within the park while simultaneously engaging youth and young adults in resource stewardship, citizen science, and service-learning. three people posing with equipment in canyon valley The Dragonfly Mercury Project: Citizen Science in Action at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area This study, jointly managed by the National Park Service and U.S. Geological Survey, engages citizen scientists in collecting dragonfly larvae in national parks for mercury analysis. The results help inform resource management decisions and show that mercury concentrations vary widely both within and among parks, suggesting that they depend not only on source emissions, but also on landscape processes that occur after deposition. group of NPS staff and volunteers posing in front of a desert canyon Series: Intermountain Park Science 2021 Integrating Research and Resource Management in Intermountain National Parks Group of National Park Service staff and volunteers standing in front of a desert canyon. Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Plan like a Park Ranger with these top 10 tips for visiting Glen Canyon and Rainbow Bridge. Hiker treks along the rocky trail Water in the Rock: Tinajas in Glen Canyon If you’re hiking in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and come across a pool of water in the rock, chances are you’ve found a tinaja (pronounced "tihn-AH-hah"). Tinajas are depressions in the sandstone that hold water from rain and snowmelt. Smaller tinajas may dry out, but larger tinajas can retain water year-round. Large or small, tinajas are important, providing a potential water source in the arid desert for both animals and people. Eroded depressions in the sandstone filled with water. Riparian Zones—It’s all about the Water Glen Canyon National Recreation Area: More than 3,000 miles of waterways flow through Glen Canyon National Recreation Area—that’s more than the distance between Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.! The amount of water in this desert ecosystem depends mainly on annual snowpack and precipitation. Riparian plant communities along these waterways can be cattail/rush/sedge marshes, willows, or deciduous forests. The communities provide habitat and stabilize stream banks from erosion. People working in dense willows.
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Rainbow Bridge National Monument National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Vol. 13, No. 1, 2017 The official newspaper PHOTO: NPS Trash Trackers Visitor Guide 2017 Glen Canyon Continues The Party Into The Next Century One hundred and one. That’s how old the National Park Service will be turning in 2017. It doesn’t quite measure up to the excitement of turning 100, does it? In 2016, we rolled out the red carpet to celebrate 100 years since the creation of the National Park Service, the agency that takes care of places like Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Now that it’s 2017, the party hats have been put away and the guests have all gone home. site, where preservation and enjoyment are one and the same. Perhaps your visit will include taking a power boat out on Lake Powell or paddling a kayak down the Colorado River to get a taste for what Glen Canyon was like before the dam was built, creating Lake Powell. Maybe you would prefer to explore Glen Canyon by foot on one of several hiking trails, taking in the sights and sounds of the desert around you. Or have they? Regardless of how you choose to experience Glen Canyon, you are sure to come in contact with the unique resources that make this place so special; stunning rock formations millions of years in the making, cliff dwellings left behind by ancient peoples, the footprints of a coyote hunting for its supper under some of the darkest skies on earth. The National Park Service continues to protect these things and more so that they will be here for the next 100 years, and that is certainly something worth celebrating year after year! The reality is, you don’t make it to be 100 years old if you’re not doing something right. And with over 300 million visitors every year it seems like the public would agree. The National Parks are truly the pride of our nation, where citizens and visitors alike can experience the best that this country has to offer. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is no exception. Over 3 million visitors per year come here to recreate within this unique National Park Service Park Info Park Map ....................2 Fees ............................2 Weather ......................3 Ranger Programs .........3 Safety .........................4 Volunteer ....................4 Districts South....................... 6-7 Page, Wahweap, Antelope Canyon North........................8-9 Bullfrog, Halls Crossing Escalante....................10 Lees Ferry....................11 Rainbow Bridge ..........12 Highlight Horseshoe Bend..............5 Welcome to Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument, home to Lake Powell and so much more! You may already know about the water-based activities like boating and fishing you can enjoy in your 1.25 million-acre national park, but that’s only a small part of our story. We have seemingly endless trails, routes, roads and canyons to explore by foot, bike or vehicle, which will impart a sense of discovery as you share in the rich history of this national treasure. Throughout the park, you’ll find evidence of our region’s past as a seabed, dinosaur habitat, sacred land of American Indian tribes, and home to Mormon pioneers. Our cultural, geological, paleontological and historical resources are only rivaled by our beautiful views. Take some time to speak with our rangers and plan a Glen Canyon trip you’ll remember forever! William Shott Superintendent Glen Canyon Overview Glen Canyon’s 1.25 million acres were set aside for the National Park Service by Congress in 1972. Its vast landscape is filled with rugged canyon lands, sandstone mesas, rivers, and a 186-mile-long reservoir called Lake Powell. Getting from the one end of the park to the other requires many hours by boat or by car. Most visitors find it impractical to visit more than one district in a single trip. For some people, it takes a lifetime to even begin to know all of the wonders Glen Canyon and Rainbow Bridge have to offer. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument During Major John Wesley Powell’s famous 1869 expedition on the Colorado River, he noted, “So we have a curious ensemble of wonderful features - carved walls, royal arches, glens, alcove gulches, mounds, and monuments. From which of these features shall we select a name? We decide to call it Glen Canyon.” National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior CANYONLANDS NATIONAL PARK Superintendent William Shott Orange Cliffs Park Address P.O. Box 1507 691 Scenic View Rd Page AZ 86040 Website Information nps.gov/glca nps.gov/rabr Email: glca_carl_hayden@nps.gov facebook.com/glencanyonnra youtube.com/glencanyonnra GLEN CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA Park Headquarters Open weekdays 7am-4pm 928-608-6200 928-608-6259 fax The National Park Service cares for the special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage. Hite CAP
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE • U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Foundation Document Overview Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Rainbow Bridge National Monument Arizona and Utah Contact Information For more information about the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument Foundation Document, contact: glca_superintendent@nps.gov or 928-608-6205 or write to: Superintendent, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument P.O. Box 1507, Page, AZ 86040-1507 Purpose Significance Significance statements express why Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument resources and values are important enough to merit national park unit designation. Statements of significance describe why an area is important within a global, national, regional, and systemwide context. These statements are linked to the purpose of the park unit, and are supported by data, research, and consensus. Significance statements describe the distinctive nature of the park and inform management decisions, focusing efforts on preserving and protecting the most important resources and values of the park unit. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, located at the center of the Colorado Plateau, provides for public enjoyment through diverse land- and waterbased recreational opportunities, and protects scenic, scientific, natural, and cultural resources on Lake Powell, the Colorado River, its tributaries, and surrounding lands. Rainbow Bridge National Monument protects an extraordinary natural bridge that captures public and scientific interest with its rainbow form and appearance. • The Colorado River and its many tributaries, including the Dirty Devil, Paria, Escalante, and San Juan rivers, carve through the Colorado Plateau to form a landscape of dynamic and complex desert and water environments. • The vast, rugged landscapes of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area provide an unparalleled spectrum of diverse land- and water-based recreational opportunities for visitors of wide-ranging interests and abilities. • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area preserves a record of more than 10,000 years of human presence, adaptation, and exploration. This place remains significant for many descendant communities, providing opportunities for people to connect with cultural values and associations that are both ancient and contemporary. • The deep, 15-mile-long, narrow gorge below the dam provides a glimpse of the high canyon walls, ancient rock art, and a vestige of the riparian and beach terrace environments that were seen by John Wesley Powell’s Colorado River expedition in 1869, providing a stark contrast to the impounded canyons of Lake Powell. • Rainbow Bridge is one of the world’s largest natural bridges and is a premier example of eccentric stream erosion in a remote area of the Colorado Plateau. • For many indigenous peoples in the Four Corners region, Rainbow Bridge is a spiritually occupied landscape that is inseparable from their cultural identities and traditional beliefs. Fundamental Resources and Values Fundamental resources and values are those features, systems, processes, experiences, stories, scenes, sounds, smells, or other attributes determined to merit primary consideration during planning and management processes because they are essential to achieving the purpose of the park and maintaining its significance. Below are the fundamental resources and values of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument. • Heritage Resources: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is the steward of heritage resources exemplified by the archeological and historic sites, cultural landscapes, and traditional cultural properties that illustrate the connection of people with the landscape of the Glen Canyon region. • • • • • • • • • • • Photo by Gary Ladd • Lake Powell: Lake Powell, set dramatically against a backdrop of eroded red rock canyons and mesas, is the largest man-made lake in North America and is widely recognized by boating enthusiasts as one of the premier water-based recreation destinations in the world. • Landscape: The vast landscape of Glen Canyon contains rugged water- and wind-carved canyons, buttes, mesas, rivers, seeps, springs, and hanging gardens where diverse habitats sustain an array of endemic, rare, and relict plant and animal communities. • Paleontology: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area preserves one of the most complete sections of Mesozoic strata in the world; new discoveries continuously add to our scientific understanding of the past. • Water: Water quality and quantity is essential for public outdoor recreational use and enjoyment and for sustaining terrestrial and aquatic life in the high desert. • Rainbow Bridge: The bridge itself is a fundamental resource. • Traditional Cultural Property and Values: Rainbow Bridge and the immediately surrounding landscape are considered sacred by, and are vitally linked with

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