"Outdoor wayside exhibit frames on roof of Castle Williams." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Governors Island

National Monument - New York

Governors Island National Monument is located in New York City on Governors Island. The island is located off the southern tip of Manhattan Island at the confluence of the Hudson and East Rivers in New York Harbor. Governors Island has become a popular seasonal destination open to the public between May and September. It contains a 43-acre (17 ha) public park, free arts and cultural events, and recreational activities. The island is accessed by ferries from Brooklyn and Manhattan.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Governors Island NM https://www.nps.gov/gois/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statue_of_Liberty Governors Island National Monument is located in New York City on Governors Island. The island is located off the southern tip of Manhattan Island at the confluence of the Hudson and East Rivers in New York Harbor. Governors Island has become a popular seasonal destination open to the public between May and September. It contains a 43-acre (17 ha) public park, free arts and cultural events, and recreational activities. The island is accessed by ferries from Brooklyn and Manhattan. From 1794 to 1966, the U.S. Army on Governors Island was part of the social, political, and economic tapestry of New York City. Today, the island is a vibrant summer seasonal venue of art, culture, and performance against the backdrop of two centuries of military heritage and the skyline of one of the great cities of the world. The island is open to the public, May 1st thru Oct 31st Governors Island is located in New York Harbor, 1/2 mile from the southern tip of Lower Manhattan and 400 yards west of the end of Brooklyn's Atlantic Avenue and Red Hook waterfront. It is accessible only via ferry. Ferry service from Manhattan is the main way to access the island. During the summer public access season, the ferry departs from Battery Maritime Building at 10 South Street, at South and Whitehall Streets (next to the Staten Island ferry terminal). Check www.govisland.com for ferry schedules. Governors Island Governors Island National Monument has no formal visitor center, but park staff can be found at Castle Williams Fort Jay gate house and moat. Bridge over dry moat leading into a gated fort. An early spring morning view of Fort Jay. The gate house is the oldest structure on Governors Island dating back to 1794. Castle Williams at Governors Island National Monument Front of sandstone brick fort with arched entrance way. Castle Williams at Governors Island National Monument was constructed in 1811 and was a pioneering design in American fortifications. Ranger guided tour of Castle Williams at Governors Island National Monument A park ranger talking to a group of visitors inside a large stone room in a fort. Ranger-led tours of Castle Williams show the pioneering features of fortification architecture that would be used in other masonry forts constructed in the 1800s. Manhattan from Fort Jay Manhattan Skyline stands behind the barracks of Fort Jay History frames our understanding of the present Manhattan from Castle Williams Canon and Manhattan Skyline from top of castle A civil war era canon sitting upon the top of Castle Williams juxtaposes the new and old, with the glimering shine of Manhattan in the background Find Your Park 2019 ad campaign starts with parks in NYC and San Francisco In the fall of 2019, the National Park Foundation rolled out new ads in San Francisco and New York for the Find Your Park campaign. From September 23 through October 28, a series of digital and static outdoor ads appeared in bus shelters, billboards, and other spaces in the city of New York and San Francisco. display ads featuring John Muir National Historic Site Irish Soldiers in the Union Army Although many Irishmen were found throughout the Union, and to a lesser degree, Confederate forces, numerous specifically "Irish" regiments and companies enabled new immigrants to join comrades with a similar background. Most famous was the Irish Brigade of the Army of the Potomac, particularly distinguished for hard fighting at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg. Recruiting Poster for the 69th New York, comprised entirely of Irish Americans Preserving Places of Captivity: Civil War Military Prisons in the National Parks During the Civil War, over 400,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were held prisoner at more than 150 diff erent prison sites. Approximately 56,000 of these died in captivity. Although Andersonville is the most famous Civil War prison, it is only one of many Civil War military prisons that are preserved by the National Park Service. Industry and Economy during the Civil War Both North and South mobilized industry to an unprecedented degree. But the North, which already had a head start in nearly every realm of industrial and agricultural development, far outpaced the South during the war. Unhampered by the southern opposition in such areas as providing free land to farmers and subsidizing a transcontinental railroad before the war, Congress passed sweeping legislation to expand the economy. As the war dragged on, in part because many of the ba Lithograph showing industrial and technological advancements of the Civil War

also available

National Parks
USFS NW