"Feed Lot and Sheds" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Grant-Kohrs Ranch

National Historic Site - Montana

The Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site commemorates the Western cattle industry from its 1850s inception through recent times. The original ranch was established in 1862 by a Canadian fur trader, Johnny Grant, at Cottonwood Creek, Montana (future site of Deer Lodge, Montana), along the banks of the Clark Fork river. The ranch was later expanded by a cattle baron, Conrad Kohrs (1866–1920).

maps

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site (NHS) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grant-Kohrs Ranch - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site (NHS) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.Montana State - Montana Highway Map

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/grko/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grant-Kohrs_Ranch_National_Historic_Site The Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site commemorates the Western cattle industry from its 1850s inception through recent times. The original ranch was established in 1862 by a Canadian fur trader, Johnny Grant, at Cottonwood Creek, Montana (future site of Deer Lodge, Montana), along the banks of the Clark Fork river. The ranch was later expanded by a cattle baron, Conrad Kohrs (1866–1920). Wide open spaces, the hard-working cowboy, his spirited cow pony, and vast herds of cattle are among the strongest symbols of the American West. Once the headquarters of a 10 million acre cattle empire, Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site preserves these symbols and commemorates the role of cattlemen in American history. Arriving from the east: Take Interstate 90, exit 187. Drive through town, approximately 2.5 miles. Turn left onto Grant Circle and enter the park. Arriving from the west: Take Interstate 90, exit 184. Turn right. Drive approximately 3/4 of a mile. Turn right on to Grant Circle and enter the park. Visitor Center Located just on the west end of the main parking lot, the visitor center can provide you with program information, park pamphlets, area information, and an overall introduction to Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site. There is also a bookstore located inside. Grant-Kohrs Ranch is located directly off I-90 midway between Yellowstone NP and Glacier NP in Deer Lodge, Montana. We are easily accessible from the interstate. The ranch is 1/2 mile from exit 184. We can also be accessed from exit 187. After a short 2 mile drive through the city of Deer Lodge you will see Grant-Kohrs Ranch located at the north end of town. The Ranch House A front view of the ranch house. The front portion of the ranch house was originally built by Canadian fur trader Johnny Grant in 1862. The Ranch House A view of the rear of the ranch house. The rear portion of the ranch house was an addition put on by Conrad Kohrs in 1891. Deer Lodge Mountain Deer Lodge Mountain rises up over the pastures of Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site. Deer Lodge Mountain, and the rest of the Flint Creek Range, directly influence the weather in the valley below. Reveal Fenced green pasture in front, 3 ranch buildings across center, blue sky with large white clouds. Many people are surprised by the first glimpse of the historic ranch buildings. Cattle Herd Moving Herd of cattle moving from back right to front left in front of historic buildings The ranch cattle herd contains Hereford, Shorthorn and Texas Longhorn, which were popular breeds during the Open Range Cattle Era Cowboy on Horseback with Cattle Historic buildings surround fenced pasture, cattle being moved by cowboy on horseback toward viewer. The American Cowboy developed during the Open Range Era and became a cultural icon. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site, Montana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] ranch buildings and mountains beyond Wildland Fire: Collaboration Key During Grant Kohrs July 4 Fire Brad Harris, Glacier’s fire management specialist-fuels, was returning from a fire in Colorado on July 1, when a passing train ignited two small fires in and near Grant Kohrs Ranch NHS. Harris stopped at GRKO to make sure the fire’s documentation was complete, inventory the cache, work on the pump and pump trailer, and conduct structure assessments. Harris responded as incident commander when a passing train ignited six fires in the park on July 4. burned area of a wildland fire with a train track Grant-Kohrs Ranch NHS Landscape Grant Kohrs Ranch is an outstanding representation of the days of the open range cattle industry in the American West during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Operated by Conrad Warren from 1929-1982, the Grant Kohrs Ranch/Warren Ranch represents the modernization of cattle ranching on the Great Plains of the American West. Grant Kohrs Ranch (S. Davis, NPS) Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site Begins Long-Awaited Prescribed Fire Project Grant-Kohrs Ranch NHS sits adjacent to Deer Lodge, Montana, with just the Clark Fork River corridor--a Superfund site--and a railroad track separating the ranch from the town. The riparian area is choked with thick brush and flashy grass ripe to burn. During dry conditions, trains often ignite fires, potentially posing a threat to both historic structures on the ranch and Deer Lodge. Finally in 2012, NPS fire managers conducted the first prescribed burn. firefighters ignite a prescribed burn Kohrs Ranch House and Yard Cultural Landscape The Ranch House is contained within the “Home Ranch” building cluster, which was primarily constructed by John Grant and Conrad Kohrs between 1860 and 1919. Closely tied to the establishment of the range cattle ranching industry in Montana and associated with the pioneers of western cattle ranching, the Ranch House and its associated landscape functioned as the nucleus of business transactions and social functions for the once extensive ranching operation. Kohrs Ranch House (NPS) National Park Getaway: Grant-Kohrs National Historic Site Wide open spaces, the hard-working cowboy, his spirited cow pony, and vast herds of cattle are among the strongest symbols of the American West. Once headquarters of a 10-million-acre cattle empire, Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site preserves these symbols and commemorates the role of cattlemen in American history. an old fenced ranch yard with mountains in the distance Checking Grant-Kohrs Ranch's Vital Signs In 2007, the Rocky Mountain Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called “vital signs,” in Grant-Kohrs Ranch and nearby park units. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate, supporting park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Division and its work in Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site. Small river edged by tall, thick green grass with trees and mountains in the background. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains

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