"Autumn - Heintooga Ridge Road" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Great Smoky Mountains

National Park - NC, TN

Great Smoky Mountains National Park straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee. The sprawling landscape encompasses lush forests and an abundance of wildflowers that bloom year-round. Streams, rivers and waterfalls appear along hiking routes that include a segment of the Appalachian Trail. An observation tower tops Clingmans Dome, the highest peak, offering scenic views of the mist-covered mountains.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Blue Ridge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/grsm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Smoky_Mountains_National_Park Great Smoky Mountains National Park straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee. The sprawling landscape encompasses lush forests and an abundance of wildflowers that bloom year-round. Streams, rivers and waterfalls appear along hiking routes that include a segment of the Appalachian Trail. An observation tower tops Clingmans Dome, the highest peak, offering scenic views of the mist-covered mountains. Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains, and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, this is America's most visited national park. Plan your visit today! Great Smoky Mountains National Park straddles the borders of the states of Tennessee and North Carolina. The three main entrances to the park are in Gatlinburg, TN; Townsend, TN; and Cherokee, NC. Cades Cove Visitor Center Park information. Indoor and outdoor exhibits of Southern Mountain life and culture, including a grist mill which operates spring through fall, the Becky Cable house, and other historic structures. Ranger-led programs conducted seasonally. Bookstore and shop. Public restrooms. Located halfway around the Cades Cove Loop Road. Clingmans Dome Visitor Contact Station Park information. Bookstore and shop. Public restrooms. Located at the end of Clingmans Dome Road, seven miles from Newfound Gap Road. Oconaluftee Visitor Center Begin your exploration of the park at a visitor center, where you can pick up a park map or newspaper, have your questions answered, and purchase books and guides to the park. Cultural history exhibits. Ranger-led programs conducted seasonally. Bookstore and shop. Public restrooms. Soda and water vending machines. The adjacent Mountain Farm Museum contains a collection of log structures including a farmhouse, barn, smokehouse, applehouse, corn cribs and others. Located on Newfound Gap Road (US-441) two miles north of Cherokee, NC Sugarlands Visitor Center Begin your exploration of the park at a visitor center, where you can pick up a park map or newspaper, have your questions answered, and purchase books and guides to the park. Free 20-minute film about the park. Natural history exhibits. Ranger-led programs conducted seasonally. Bookstore and shop. Public restrooms. Soda and water vending machines. Backcountry Permit Office. Located on Newfound Gap Road (US-441) two miles south of Gatlinburg, TN. Abrams Creek Campground Abrams Creek Campground - elevation 1,125 feet (343m) - is located beside beautiful Abram's Creek in a remote and secluded setting. The climate is moderate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Tent only camping, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. There are no hookups or showers at the campground. Hammocks are allowed over the footprint of the campsite. Limited to trees 10 inches in diameter with adequate padding around the tree and only 2 hammocks may be suspended from tree. Camping Fee 17.50 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Abrams Creek Campground Campsite set-up with an orange tent, two chairs sitting by the campfire ring and items on the table. Abrams is a remote campground with no services nearby. Be sure to bring everything you need when camping here. Balsam Mt. Campground Balsam Mountain Campground - elevation 5,310 feet (1618m) - is surrounded by mountain ranges and pristine streams. Daytime temperatures rarely exceed 70°F and may dip into the low 50's at night. Tent only camping, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. There are no hookups or showers and no lights in the restrooms. Hammocks are allowed over the footprint of the campsite. Limited to trees 10 inches in diameter with adequate padding around the tree and only 2 hammocks may be suspended from tree. Camping Fee 17.50 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Family Time - Balsam Mountain Campground A family of six sitting around a campfire eating dinner. Family Time Big Creek Campground Big Creek Campground - elevation 1,700 feet (518m) - is located beside beautiful Big Creek in a remote and secluded setting. The climate is moderate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Tent only camping, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. There are no hookups or showers at the campground. Hammocks are allowed over the footprint of the campsite. Limited to trees 10 inches in diameter with adequate padding around the tree and only 2 hammocks may be suspended from tree. Camping Fee 17.50 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Big Creek Campground A wooded campsite with gravel tent pad Big Creek Campground is located in a remote portion of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Cades Cove Campground Cades Cove Campground - elevation 1713 feet (522m) - is open year round and combines the feel of primitive camping with the modern convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. Both Loop B and C are open from mid-April through the Thanksgiving weekend. During the off season (Dec-mid April) only sites C1-12 and C26-61 are open to camping by reservation only. Once B Loop closes for the season then generators will be allowed in Loop C, with restricted hours, UNTIL Loop B reopens for camping. Camping Fee 25.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night during reservation season May 15th - October 31st. Cades Cove Campground Wooded campsite with fall color surrounding a yellow tent. Over 2 million visitors annually come to enjoy the scenic beauty of Cades Cove and its many historic structures. Cades Cove Group Campground Cades Cove combines the feel of primitive camping with the modern convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. A camp store provides visitors with basic necessities as well as bike rentals. Events like interpretive programs in the nearby amphitheater and bicycle-only days on the loop road provide visitors with a fun and unique experience. Group Site #1-2 35.00 20 person maximum Group Site #3 65.00 30 person maximum Group Site#4 53.00 30 person maximum Cades Cove CADES COVE GROUP CADES COVE GROUP Cades Cove Night Sky Deer Bear Cub Wild Turkey Cataloochee Campground Cataloochee Campground - elevation 2,600 feet (792m) - located in historic Cataloochee Valley, is surrounded by mountain ranges and pristine streams characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. It offers traditional camping with the convenience of flush toilets, and drinking water. There are no hookups or showers. Hammocks are allowed over the footprint of the campsite. Limited to trees 10 inches in diameter with adequate padding around the tree and only 2 hammocks may be suspended from tree. Camping Fee 25.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Reservations are required. Cataloochee Campground White 5th wheel RV and camp chairs at campsite. Cataloochee campground is located in the historic Cataloochee Valley--a relatively remote part of Smoky Mountain National Park. Bull Elk Near Cataloochee Campground Bull elk bugling during the fall rut. Bull elk bugling during the fall run. Cosby Campground Mountain ranges and a pristine river are the backdrop for your camping adventure in Cosby. At 2,450 feet, Cosby provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Cosby Campground offers campsites for tents as well as RVs. Campsite Fee 14.00 Per site per night. Up to 6 people per site. Group Campsites Cosby Creek Nature Trail Footbridge over Cosby Creek Cosby Creek Tent Handicap accessible restroom Cosby Kiosk Some tent sites offset from road Lower Mount Cammerer trail head GRSM Entrance Sign Nature trail Unique sunset seen from campground Snow Sign RV site with tent pad ADA day use Bench and footbridge on trail to Sutton Ridge. Cosby Turkey Turkey Jam! Cosby Park Rd. Tent in the fall. Hammocks at Cosby Day use Secluded tent sites Cosby Trail Fall Tree Tops Fall Camping Deep Creek Campground Mountain ranges and a pristine creek are the backdrop for your camping adventure in Deep Creek. At 1,800 feet, Deep Creek provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Deep Creek Campground offers campsites for tents as well as RVs. Camping Fee 17.00 Camping fee is per site, per night. view of walk-up campsites Walk up site Elkmont Campground Mountain ranges and a pristine river are the backdrop for your camping adventure in Elkmont. At 2,150 feet, Elkmont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Elkmont Campground offers campsites for tents as well as RVs. Campsite 25.00 Reservations are recommended from May 15th - October 31st. Maximum occupancy of each site is 6 people. No hook-ups, rest rooms with running water are available. Riverside Campsites 27.00 Fee charged for riverside sites during reservation season May 15th - October 31st. Elkmont Campground Sun shining through the forest over an occupied campsite. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont Campsite Sun rays beaming through the forest over an occupied campsite. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont Campsite Unoccupied campsite in Elkmont Campground Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont River Site Unoccupied river campsite in Elkmont Campground. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont Campsite Unoccupied campsite in Elkmont Campground on a sunny summer day. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont Campground Office Elkmont Campground Office and information kiosk on a sunny day. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont Campground Store Elkmont Campground store and vending machines. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Elkmont Group Campground These sites offers an ideal setting for group camping excursions and outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds. Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 53.00 Site #1, 30 people maximum, no RVs or trailers allowed. Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 35.00 Site #2, 20 person maximum Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 26.00 Site #3, 15 person maximum Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 35.00 Site #4, 20 person maximum ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP Smokemont Campground Mountain ranges and pristine streams and rivers are the backdrop for your camping adventure in Smokemont. Whether blanketed in spring wildflowers or vivid fall colors, the scenery at Smokemont never disappoints. At 2,200 feet, Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Smokemont Campground offers an unforgettable outdoor experience with campsites for tents as well as RVs. Camping Fee 25.00 Fee is per site, per night (May 15th-October 31st) Smokemont Group Campground Mountain ranges and pristine streams and rivers are the backdrop for your camping adventure in Smokemont. Whether blanketed in spring wildflowers or vivid fall colors, the scenery at Smokemont never disappoints. At 2,200 feet, Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Smokemont Campground offers an unforgettable outdoor experience with campsites for tents as well as RVs. Frosty Morning in Cades Cove A thick layer of frost covers the fields, trees, and mountains in Cades Cove. Wintertime brings a quiet beauty to the Great Smoky Mountains. "Smoke" Rising From the Mountains Wisps of fog hang over the forests in the mountains. The park gets its name from mists that often rise like smoke from the mountains. A Foggy Morning at Cades Cove Methodist Church Tombstones stand in front of a white, wooden church on a foggy morning. Historic buildings such as churches, gristmills, barns, and homes allow visitors to get a feel for life in the mountains before the national park was created. The Waters of Roaring Fork Below Grotto Falls Rhododendron bushes line the banks of a stream filled with large boulders. Abundant rainfall means lush forests and beautiful stream scenes in the Great Smoky Mountains. The "Wildflower National Park" A hillside in the forest covered with white trillium flowers Wildflowers, such as these white trillium, can be found blooming from February through November in the park. Fall Colors Near Newfound Gap Bright gold and red leaves shine through the fog in a forest. Fall leaf season is one of the busiest times of year in the park. Fall Meets Winter Gold and red fall colors fill the valleys while snow coats the mountain tops. In spring and fall, weather in the foothills can be pleasant, while snow and cold rule on the mountain tops. Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. 2015 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Six people and programs received the 2015 Harzog Award for their exceptional volunteer service. Check out their amazing contributions! Young volunteer giving a thumbs up sign 2014 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Discover the inspirational stories and amazing dedication of volunteers honored with the 2014 Hartzog Award. Volunteer Thelma Johnson standing with her cooking equipment 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Study Finds Cleaner Air in the Smokies New research finds that ground-level ozone pollution in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) has dropped to its lowest levels since the mid-1980s. Newfound Gap, Great Smoky Mountains National Park Natural Partnership Forged in Fire: National Park Service and The Nature Conservancy Early in 2015, Great Smoky Mountains fire staff met with local TNC representatives to explore avenues for sharing resources on prescribed fire activities and getting more fire on the ground in the Smokies and the Southern Appalachians. Cultural Landscapes by Bicycle There are many ways to experience national parks by bicycle, with route options for all levels of experience and preference. Here are just three examples of ways to explore park cultural landscapes by bike in the southeastern part of the United States. Ride a loop road through an agricultural community in a fertile valley, follow the path of a former railroad that once brought tourists to Mammoth Cave, or travel mountain bike trails to a farmstead from the late 1800s. Two people with bikes gaze over a valley filled with fog, with blue mountains in the background. Testing Hypotheses for Plant Species Distributions in the Mountains Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a site with scientific value. One such scientific landmark is the work of Robert Whittaker, whose PhD dissertation research in the 1940s illuminated the complexity of ecological succession. His work has had a lasting effect on the field of ecology ever since. Orange, yellow and green foliage on a mountainside Park Air Profiles - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Air quality profile for Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Great Smoky Mountains NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Great Smoky Mountains NP. Fall foliage in Great Smoky Mountains National Park Canadian Top Prescribed Burn 2013 In May 2013, wildland firefighters in Great Smoky Mountains NP began a prescribed burn in the Jesse Ridge subunit as part of the Canadian Top Prescribed Fire Plan for the pines and mixed hardwoods found on ridges surrounding the Cataloochee Valley area in the eastern portion on the North Carolina side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The plan includes reducing hazardous fuel accumulations and restoring and maintaining a diverse and functioning ecosystem. Ozone effects on two ecosystem services at Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA Protected areas such as national parks are recognized as important providers of ecosystem services, the benefits nature conveys to humans. However, some threats to these services, such as air pollution, can derive from outside a park’s boundaries. Stream and forest in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. NPS/Tamara Blett World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Louis E. Voorheis The Voorheis Estate, a landscape within the North District of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, encompass the former mountain retreat developed by Louis E. Voorheis from 1928-1944. It is an example of Rustic style architecture and landscape architecture, evident in the form of structures and designed water features. A stone wall with a rounded top and a square stone basin, surrounded by woodland Foothills Parkway: The Next Steps Foothills Parkways, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, is the last Congressionally mandated parkway that remains to be completed. Constructing a bridge on the Foothills Parkway Reef Bay Trail Rehabilitation Virgin Islands National Park wants to thank Great Smoky Mountain Trail Crew for their tremendous work in rehabilitate the Reef Bay Trail. In addition to clearing the trail much of it had to be reconstructed or redirected. Smoky Mountain Trail Crew Bat Projects in Parks: Great Smoky Mountains National Park There are more than one way to keep up with bats in a park. Find out all the Great Smoky Mountains National Park did! A bat with white fuzz on its muzzle Wildlife Connectivity Near Great Smoky Mountains National Park Jeff Hunter provides an overview of a collaborative wildlife connectivity project focused on 28-miles of highway corridor along I-40 near Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The project seeks to improve the ability of black bear, white-tailed deer, elk (reintroduced in 2001), & other wildlife to safely cross this busy interstate highway and access Cherokee National Forest and other conservation lands northeast of the park. (March 2019) two black bears Creating BearWise Community Partnerships Creating BearWise Community Partnerships looks at the working relationship between Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), and how it has fostered community partnerships that encourage communities surrounding GRSM to become BearWise. (June 2020) evening city view with mountains in the background Women in Fire Science: Cynthia Worthington Cynthia Worthington is a fire effects monitor and has worked in several different units of the National Park Service during her career. The importance of collaboration with other fields and the built-in adaptability of fire programs is one of her favorite parts of working in fire that keeps her coming back. A woman in black rain gear stands with a clipboard in a meadow. Outside Science (inside parks): Smoky Salamanders Student interns get their hands dirty while looking for tiny salamanders at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. captured salamander in a baggie National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks Pollinators - Monarch butterfly More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers, yet one of the greatest threats to Monarch populations is loss of habitat. A Monarch clings to an orange flower Using Citizen Scientists to Document Life Cycle Changes Citizen scientists of all ages help uncover how the timing of natural events, such as flowering or migration, is changing from year to year in the Great Smoky Mountains. Two girls identifying a tree Partnerships Make Wetland Restoration Happen Tribes, volunteers, and students came together to restore a critically important wetland in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Teamwork made the project successful. group of people plant native plants in a grassy meadow Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Burned Area Recovery from the Chimney Tops 2 Fire, Great Smoky Mountains National Park After the 2016 Chimney Tops 2 Fire in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, staff has undertaken several projects to stabilize and restore the landscape, including a project for the cultivation and preservation of eastern hemlock. Two Americorps team members hold insecticide next to a tree. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina and Tennessee Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] valley with stream Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Dare to Imagine: Alix Pfennigwerth Scroll through this bright data visualization to learn how Biologist Alix Pfennigwerth studies and protects biodiversity hotspots in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This data story is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. Meet Alix Pfennigwerth, a Biological Science Technician at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Appalachian-Piedmont-Coastal Zone Fire Management Staff Complete Wears Valley Boundary Prescribed Fire Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Appalachian-Piedmont-Coastal Zone fire management staff successfully completed a 175-acre prescribed burn along a half-mile of the park boundary in Wears Valley in March 2021. The prescribed burn was conducted to reduce the amount of flammable brush along the park's boundary with residential homes, as well as maintain an open woodland habitat for drought-tolerant trees, like oak and pine.   Staff monitors prescribed fire at Great Smoky National Park. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Girl (Guide) Power Just as the contributions of many women have been overlooked in NPS history, so too have the contributions of girls who held officially sanctioned guide positions. Two girl ranger aides speak with a man across a counter.

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming