"Grand Teton, Moose Entrance" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Grand Teton

National Park - Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park is in the northwest of the U.S state of Wyoming. It encompasses the Teton mountain range, the 4,000-meter Grand Teton peak, and the valley known as Jackson Hole. It’s a popular destination in summer for mountaineering, hiking, backcountry camping and fishing, linked to nearby Yellowstone National Park by the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

maps

Official visitor map of Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Teton - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Winter Recreation Opportunities in Ashton-Island Park and Teton Basin Ragner Districts (RD) in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Caribou-Targhee - Ashton-Island Park - Winter Recreation

Map of Winter Recreation Opportunities in Ashton-Island Park and Teton Basin Ragner Districts (RD) in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Summer Recreation Opportunities in Ashton-Island Park Ranger District in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Caribou-Targhee - Ashton-Island Park - Summer Recreation

Map of Summer Recreation Opportunities in Ashton-Island Park Ranger District in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Jackson Off-Road Vehicle Trails (ORV) in Wyoming. Published by Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites, & Trails (WYSP).Jackson - ORV Trails 2021

Map of Jackson Off-Road Vehicle Trails (ORV) in Wyoming. Published by Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites, & Trails (WYSP).

Map of Winter Recreation Opportunities in Teton Basin and Palisades Ranger Districts (RD) in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Caribou-Targhee - Teton Basin and Palisades - Winter Recreation

Map of Winter Recreation Opportunities in Teton Basin and Palisades Ranger Districts (RD) in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Summer Recreation Opportunities in the Palisades and Teton Basin Ranger Districts in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Caribou-Targhee - Teton Basin - Summer Recreation

Map of Summer Recreation Opportunities in the Palisades and Teton Basin Ranger Districts in Caribou-Targhee National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Blackrock Ranger District in Bridger-Teton National Forest (NF) in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Bridger-Teton MVUM - Blackrock 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Blackrock Ranger District in Bridger-Teton National Forest (NF) in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Jackson Ranger District in Bridger-Teton National Forest (NF) in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Bridger-Teton MVUM - Jackson 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Jackson Ranger District in Bridger-Teton National Forest (NF) in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the Snowmobile Trails in the Continental Divide Region in Wyoming. The region follows the Wind River Range and includes trail systems to the North: Yellowstone, Togwotee Pass, Dubois, Upper Green River and Gros Ventre areas; and to the South: Lander to Irish Canyon areas. Published by Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites, & Trails (WYSP).Continental Divide - Snowmobile Trails 2021

Map of the Snowmobile Trails in the Continental Divide Region in Wyoming. The region follows the Wind River Range and includes trail systems to the North: Yellowstone, Togwotee Pass, Dubois, Upper Green River and Gros Ventre areas; and to the South: Lander to Irish Canyon areas. Published by Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites, & Trails (WYSP).

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Pinedale Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Wyoming Public Land - Pinedale

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Pinedale Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Fall edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Teton Guide - Fall 2018

Fall edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Summer edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Teton Guide - Summer 2018

Summer edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Spring edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Teton Guide - Spring 2018

Spring edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Winter edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Teton Guide - Winter 2017/2018

Winter edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Centennial edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Teton Guide - Centennial 2016

Centennial edition of the Visitor Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Backcountry Camping brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Backcountry Camping

Backcountry Camping brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Bicycling brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Bicycling

Bicycling brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Boating brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Boating

Boating brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Cross-Country Skiing & Snowshoeing brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Cross-Country Skiing & Snowshoeing

Cross-Country Skiing & Snowshoeing brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Driving Tour brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Driving Tour

Driving Tour brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Elk Reduction brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Elk Reduction

Elk Reduction brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Fishing brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Fishing

Fishing brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Floating the Snake River brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Floating the Snake River

Floating the Snake River brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Day Hike and Lakeshore Maps for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Day Hike and Lakeshore Maps

Day Hike and Lakeshore Maps for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Mountaineering brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Mountaineering

Mountaineering brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Pets brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Pets

Pets brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Snowmobiling brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Snowmobiling

Snowmobiling brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Saddle and Pack Stock brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Activities - Saddle and Pack Stock

Saddle and Pack Stock brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Bird Finding Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Bird Finding Guide

Bird Finding Guide for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Elk Ecology & Management brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Elk Ecology & Management

Elk Ecology & Management brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Journey Through the Past: A Geologic Tour in Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Geologic Tour

Journey Through the Past: A Geologic Tour in Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Disappearing Glaciers brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Disappearing Glaciers

Disappearing Glaciers brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Disappearing Glaciers brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Fall Colors

Disappearing Glaciers brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Mammals brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Mammals

Mammals brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Common Plants brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Common Plants

Common Plants brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

11,000 Years of Human Influence: The Archeological Record for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Culture - Archeology

11,000 Years of Human Influence: The Archeological Record for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Creation of Grand Teton National Park brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Culture - Creation of Grand Teton National Park

Creation of Grand Teton National Park brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

A Walk Through Time brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Culture - A Walk Through Time

A Walk Through Time brochure for Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Built Beneath the Mountains - Historic Properties in Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Culture - Historic Properties

Built Beneath the Mountains - Historic Properties in Grand Teton National Park (NP) in Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/grte https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Teton_National_Park Grand Teton National Park is in the northwest of the U.S state of Wyoming. It encompasses the Teton mountain range, the 4,000-meter Grand Teton peak, and the valley known as Jackson Hole. It’s a popular destination in summer for mountaineering, hiking, backcountry camping and fishing, linked to nearby Yellowstone National Park by the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands as a monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River, and enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place. Grand Teton National Park is located in northwestern Wyoming; north of the town of Jackson, Wyoming and south of Yellowstone National Park. BY CAR: Salt Lake City, Utah is approximately 300 miles and about 5-6 hours from the park Denver, Colorado is approximately 550 miles and about 8-10 hours from the park BY AIR: Grand Teton National Park is unique in that it is the only national park that has a commercial airport within its border, Jackson Hole Airport (JAC). Colter Bay Visitor Center A surviving Mission 66 visitor center, the Colter Bay Visitor Center provides great views of Jackson Lake. Inside, view 35 artifacts from the David T. Vernon Indian Arts Collection. The auditorium hosts ranger-led programs and shows a variety of park-related videos throughout the day. Visit this facility for trip planning information, backcountry, or boating permits. Shop at the Grand Teton Association bookstore, attend a ranger-led program, or visit nearby shops and restaurants. Heading north on US 26/89/191, turn left (north) at Moran Junction and continue 10.5 miles on US 89/191/287 to the Colter Bay Village sign, turn left (west) and continue about one mile to the visitor center. Heading south on US 89/191/287 from Yellowstone National Park, continue 18.5 miles to the Colter Bay Village sign, turn right (west) and continue about one mile to the visitor center Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center The grand expanse of the Teton Range rises above the visitor center. Inside, interwoven themes of place, people, preservation, mountaineering, and American Indians encourage visitors to contemplate the past, present, and future of this place. Visit this facility for trip planning information, backcountry or boating permits. Shop at the Grand Teton Association bookstore, enjoy the variety of exhibits and artwork, attend a ranger program or watch a movie about the park. Located 12 miles north of Jackson, Wyoming just off US Highway 26/89/191. Turn west at Moose Junction onto the Teton Park Road. Continue for 0.5 mile and cross the Snake River. Turn left/south into the parking lot. Flagg Ranch Information Station The Flagg Ranch Information Station is located in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway—the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. For visitors traveling south from Yellowstone National Park, Flagg Ranch is the first stop for trip planning information. This small wooden cabin is staffed daily during the peak summer season and includes a visitor information area, small sales area, exhibits depicting the Rockefeller legacy and restrooms. Heading south on US 89/191/287, continue two miles south from the South Gate of Yellowstone National Park and turn right (west) at the Headwaters sign. Heading north on US 89/191/287, continue 22 miles north from Jackson Lake Junction and turn left (west) at the Headwaters sign. Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center The Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center is an inter-agency visitor center located in Jackson, WY. The visitor center is owned and operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the National Elk Refuge. The six agencies that operate from the visitor center are the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Grand Teton Association, Grand Teton National Park, National Elk Refuge, Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce, and Wyoming Game & Fish. The Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center is an inter-agency visitor center located in Jackson, WY. Jenny Lake Ranger Station In the 1930s, the Jenny Lake Ranger Station and Museum opened as the park’s first visitor facility. Today, climbing rangers provide backcountry safety information, climbing route conditions and perform mountain rescues. A small raised-relief map features the core backcountry area and other exhibits address backcountry risks. A safety video provides visitors with essential information. The ranger station issues backcountry permits to all backcountry users. Heading north from Jackson on US 26/89/191, turn left (west) at Moose Junction and continue eight miles north to South Jenny Lake Junction. Turn left (west) into the developed area. Heading south from Yellowstone on US 89/191/287, turn right (southwest) at Jackson Lake Junction and continue 12 miles south to South Jenny Lake Junction. Turn right (west) into the developed area. Jenny Lake Visitor Center Harrison Crandall built this cabin in 1921 near the Cathedral Group Turnout as his studio. Today, the visitor center highlights art in the park through Crandall and other artist's work. Shop the Grand Teton Association bookstore, attend a ranger program or begin your backcountry adventure. Rangers are available in the plaza and on trails for trip planning and information. The nearby Jenny Lake Ranger Station offers backcountry permits. Heading north from Jackson on US 26/89/191, turn left (west) at Moose Junction and continue eight miles north to South Jenny Lake Junction. Turn left (west) into the developed area. Heading south from Yellowstone on US 89/191/287, turn right (southwest) at Jackson Lake Junction and continue 12 miles south to South Jenny Lake Junction. Turn right (west) into the developed area. Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve Center The Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve Center allows visitors to learn about Mr. Rockefeller's vision and his legacy of conservation stewardship. Exhibits engage visual, tactile, and auditory senses through a poem by Terry Tempest Williams, audio recordings of Mr. Rockefeller, videos, photography, and a soundscape room. Visitors may relax in the resource room, attend a ranger program, or strike out on a hike to Phelps Lake. The center does not have a sales area or offer permits. The Preserve Center is NOT accessible to vehicles over 23.3 feet long or trailers. Heading north from Teton Village on WY 390, continue 3.2 miles from the Granite Entrance Gate and turn right (east) at the Preserve Center sign. Heading south from Moose on the Teton Park Road, turn south at the sign reading "Wilson Road/Teton Village 9 miles." Continue 3.7 miles and turn left (east) at the Preserve Center sign. Colter Bay Campground This large campground is in a lodgepole pine forest near Colter Bay Village. While not on the shores of Jackson Lake, a short stroll leads to a spectacular view of Mount Moran and the northern Teton Range. Colter Bay Village has many facilities including a visitor center, restaurants, stores, cabins, and marina. Shower and laundry services are available for additional fee. Departing from the nearby Hermitage Point Trailhead, hikers traverse forests and sagebrush meadows enjoying the Teton landscape. Campsite with vehicle 38.00 Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. Campsite for Senior or Access Pass holders 19.50 Fee per night for Senior/Access pass holders with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. RV Campsite with electric hookup 60.00 Fee per night for campers who want electric hookups. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. RV Campsite with electric hookup for Senior or Access Pass holder 41.50 Fee per night for Senior/Access pass holders who want electric hookups. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. Group Campsite 13.00 A 10 person minimum is required for group campsites. The group campsite fee is $13 per person per night or $7 per person per night with Access Pass. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. The campground has 10 large group campsites that accommodate groups of more than 10 visitors who wish to tent camp. Hiker-Bicyclist Sites 12.00 Fee per night for campers arriving via foot or bike. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, nearby restrooms, and a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Hiker-bicyclist sites are available on a first-come first-served basis at Jenny Lake and Colter Bay campgrounds. Hiker-bicyclist sites do not have vehicle parking and are intended for visitors exploring by foot or bicycle. Hiker-Bicyclist Sites for Senior or Access Pass Holder 6.50 Fee per night for Golden Age/Interagency Senior or Golden Access/Interagency Access campers arriving via foot or bike. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, nearby restrooms, and a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Hiker-bicyclist sites are available on a first-come first-served basis at Jenny Lake and Colter Bay campgrounds. Sites do not have vehicle parking. Colter Bay Amphitheater outside amphitheater with visitors sitting on benches and a ranger on stage making a presentation Enjoy a ranger program at the amphitheater! Colter Bay Campground Tent Site Conifers behind a light gray dome tent and camp chairs The campground has sites for both tents and RVs. Colter Bay Campground Trailer site two small white trailers at campsites with conifers surrounding them Campsites for trailers with shade. Colter Bay Campground Sign Brown wooden park service sign with campground information and RV park information The Colter Bay campground and RV park provide accommodations for many park visitors. Colter Bay Campground Entrance Booth vehicles waiting to pay camping fees at entrance booth to campground Pay your campground fee to these helpful people. Colter Bay RV Park This RV Park provides full hookups for campers in the park. It is in a lodgepole pine forest near Colter Bay Village. While not on the shores of Jackson Lake, a short stroll leads to a spectacular view of Mount Moran and the northern Teton Range. Colter Bay Village has many facilities including a visitor center, restaurants, stores, cabins, a marina. Shower and laundry services are available for additional fee. Pull-Through Site (45ft RV or smaller) 98.00 Fee per night for campers with vehicle. All include standard hookups of water, sewer, and electricity (20, 30, & 50 amp). All sites have picnic tables and most are shaded. Restrooms have running water and flush toilets. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. Pull-Through Site for Senior and Access Pass Holders 77.00 Fee per night for Golden Age/Interagency Senior or Golden Access/Interagency Access campers with vehicle. All include standard hookups of water, sewer, and electricity (20, 30, & 50 amp). All sites have picnic tables and most are shaded. Restrooms have running water and flush toilets. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. Back-In Sites (30ft RV or smaller) 94.00 Fee per night for campers with vehicle. All include standard hookups of water, sewer, and electricity (20, 30, & 50 amp). All sites have picnic tables and most are shaded. Restrooms have running water and flush toilets. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. Back-In Sites for Senior and Access Pass Holders (30ft RV or smaller) 74.00 Fee per night for Golden Age/Interagency Senior or Golden Access/Interagency Access campers with vehicle. All include standard hookups of water, sewer, and electricity (20, 30, & 50 amp). All sites have picnic tables and most are shaded. Restrooms have running water and flush toilets. Showers and laundry services are available for an additional fee at the Colter Bay Launderette. Colter Bay RV Park Office RV park brown log cabin with green door and flowers in barrels Campers looking for full hookups may stay at the Colter Bay RV Park. Colter Bay RV Park Campsites RVs parked in campsites with dark green conifers shading the sites. The Colter Bay RV park offers full hookups in a park setting. Gros Ventre Campground The park's largest campground is in the southeast part of the park, closest to the town of Jackson. Sagebrush and grasses cover the campground as cottonwoods and blue spruce rise above. The Gros Ventre River is a short stroll away. Some sites offer views of the Grand Teton and Blacktail Butte. Wildlife including bison, moose and mule deer frequent the area. Campsite with vehicle 38.00 Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Shower facilities are located in the park, but not at this site. Utility fee included. Campsite for Senior or Access Pass holders 19.50 Fee per night for Senior/Access pass holders with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Shower facilities are located in the park, but not at this site. Utility fee included. Campsite with electric hookup 60.00 Fee per night for campers who want electric hookups. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Shower facilities are located in the park, but not at this site. Utility fee included. Campsite with electric hookup for Senior or Access Pass holder 41.50 Fee per night for Senior/Access pass holders who want electric hookups. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Shower facilities are located in the park, but not at this site. 10 of these sites are ADA compliant with an accessible restroom nearby. Utility fee included. Group Campsite 13.00 A 10 person minimum is required for group campsites. The group campsite fee is $13 per person per night or $7 per person per night with Access Pass. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. The campground has four large group campsites that accommodate groups of more than 10 visitors who wish to tent camp. Camper van at the Gros Ventre Campground A VW camper van with a plaid shirted individual looking out into the park. All kinds of campers enjoy the beautiful views of the Teton Range from the Gros Ventre Campground. Gros Ventre Campground Tent Campsite Gros Ventre campsite with red tent and silver sedan surrounded by sagebrush and cottonwoods Tents are welcome at the Gros Ventre Campground Gros Ventre Campground Kiosk Gros Ventre campground kiosk with information board and visitors checking in. Campgrounds in the park are first-come, first-served. Gros Ventre Campground Amphitheater Gros Ventre Campground Amphitheater with bench seats and stage. Join a ranger for an evening program. Gros Ventre Campground RVs Gros Ventre campsites with RVs and cottonwoods RVs of any length are welcome at the Gros Ventre Campground. Gros Ventre Campground Welcome Sign Entrance sign for Gros Ventre Campground with Blacktail Butte and the Teton Range in the distance. Gros Ventre Campground is the largest in the park and the closest to Jackson. Headwaters Campground This campground has facilities for both tent campers and RVs. Located within the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway, Flagg Ranch is only two miles south of Yellowstone and five miles north of Grand Teton. Wilderness surrounds the Headwaters development. The upper reaches of the Snake River flow through meadows mixed with open conifer forest. The campground offers 34 tent sites, 97 full-hookup and pull-through RV sites, and 40 Camper Cabins. Campsite with vehicle 42.00 Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Showers included with camping fee. Campsite for Senior or Access Pass holders 21.00 Fee per night for Senior/Access pass holders with a vehicle. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Pull-Through Site (45ft RV or smaller) 84.00 Fee per night for campers with vehicles. All include standard hookups of water, sewer, and electricity (20, 30, & 50 amp). All sites include a picnic table, fire pit with grill grate, and bear proof food storage box. Restrooms have running water, flush toilets, and complimentary showers. Coin-operated laundry services are available at the campground office. Pull-through Site for Senior and Access Pass Holders 64.00 Fee per night for Golden Age/Interagency Senior or Golden Access/Interagency Access campers with vehicles. All include standard hookups of water, sewer, and electricity (20, 30, & 50 amp). All sites include a picnic table, fire pit with grill grate, and bear proof food storage box. Restrooms have running water, flush toilets, and complimentary showers. Coin-operated laundry services are available at the campground office. Camper Cabins 77.00 Fee per night for Camper Cabin. All sites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Showers are included in camping fee. Headwaters Camper Cabins are scattered throughout the campground and include double-double or double-single bunk-style beds. While the bunks are padded, bedding and pillows not included. Guests are encouraged to bring their own linens. Camper Cabins do not offer electricity or private restrooms, but do include a lantern. Campsite at Headwaters white camper trailer with slideouts extended and picnic table partly shaded by conifers The Headwaters Campground can accommodate RVs up to 45 feet in length! Headwaters Camper Cabin small cabin for overnight lodging shaded by conifers Try one of the camper cabins if you don't have a tent or an RV. Headwaters Campground Office small wooden office building with visitor in front and car to the side. Register for your campsite at the Headwaters Campground and visit both parks. Campsites at Headwaters Campground several white camper trailers partly shaded by conifers The Headwaters Campground has full hookups and tent sites. Jenny Lake Campground This small campground is a few hundred yards from the east shore of Jenny Lake. The campground straddles a glacial moraine covered with an open forest of lodgepole pine, subalpine fir and Douglas fir. Across the lake, Teewinot Mountain, Cascade Canyon and Mount St. John dominate the landscape. No trailers, campers, or generators are allowed. Vehicles cannot be over 8 feet high or 14 feet long. Maximum per site is one tent, one vehicle, and six guests for up to 7 nights. Campsite (Tent Only) 36.00 Tent camping only. Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, nearby restrooms, and a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Campsite (Tent Only) for Senior or Access Pass holders 18.50 Tent only. Fee per night for Senior/Access pass holders with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, nearby restrooms, and a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Hiker-Bicyclist Sites 12.00 Fee per night for campers arriving via foot or bike. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, nearby restrooms, and a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Hiker-bicyclist sites are available on a first-come first-served basis at Jenny Lake and Colter Bay campgrounds. Hiker-bicyclist sites do not have vehicle parking and are intended for visitors exploring by foot or bicycle. Hiker-Bicyclist Sites for Senior or Access Pass Holder 6.50 Fee per night for Golden Age/Interagency Senior or Golden Access/Interagency Access campers arriving via foot or bike. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, nearby restrooms, and a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Hiker-bicyclist sites are available on a first-come first-served basis at Jenny Lake and Colter Bay campgrounds. Hiker-bicyclist sites do not have vehicle parking. Jenny Lake Campground Mountain View Two tents - one gray and one yellow - with Mount Teewinot in the background Some campsites have mountain views at the Jenny Lake Campground Jenny Lake Campground Welcome Sign Entrance sign to Jenny Lake Campground with Mt. St. Johns, conifers and wildflowers. Jenny Lake Campground fills early, and only allows tent camping! Jenny Lake Campground Kiosk Jenny Lake Campground registration kiosk with campground information. Self-register to camp at the Jenny Lake Campground. Jenny Lake Campground Forest Campsite Jenny Lake campsite with gray and green tent surrounded by lodgepole pines Some campsites are shaded by the forest. Jenny Lake Campground Tents Only Jenny Lake campsite with blue tent in the sun and lodgepole pines behind. Only tents are allowed at the Jenny Lake Campground. Lizard Creek Campground This rustic campground is in a remote part of Grand Teton National Park. The campground is 11 miles south of Yellowstone and eight miles north of Colter Bay Village providing easy access to both parks. The campsites are in a spruce and fir forest on the shores of Jackson Lake. One mile across the lake is the northern portion of the Teton Range including Webb Canyon, Owl and Ranger peaks. Looking south, the expanse of the Teton Range towers over Jackson Lake. Campsite with vehicle 37.00 Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Shower facilities are available in the park, but not at the campground. Campers at Lizard Creek five campers around campfire at campsite Campers enjoying their campfire. Lizard Creek Campground Sign Lizard Creek campground sign with conifers and blue sky. Stay at the Lizard Creek Campground Lizard Creek Campground Kiosk Lizard Creek Campground registration and campground information. Both tent campers and small RVs are welcome. Jackson Lake from the Lizard Creek Campground Campsite near Jackson Lake with the northern Teton Range across the water. Enjoy camping near Jackson Lake. Small trailer at Lizard Creek small camper trailer with canopy, bear box and picnic table with Jackson Lake beyond. Quiet campsites near the lake Signal Mountain Campground This campground is in an open lodgepole pine forest near the Signal Mountain Lodge. Some sites lie just above Jackson Lake, and other sites are a short walk from the lake. Enjoy spectacular views of Mount Moran and the northern Teton Range. The campground accepts both tents and smaller RVs (up to 30 feet total length). The developed area offers a wide variety of services and amenities including lodging, restaurants, showers, laundry, and marina. Maximum stay is 14 nights. Campsite with vehicle 40.00 Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Public showers are available at this site. Campsite with electric 62.00 Fee per night for campers with a vehicle. Fee listed is the base rate, state and local taxes not included. All campsites include a picnic table, fire pit, and nearby restrooms. Most sites have a bear box. Restrooms have flush toilets and cold running water. Public showers are available at this site. Tent site above Jackson Lake Blue tent with Jackson Lake and the Teton Range in the background Some tent sites are just above Jackson Lake. Signal Mountain Campground Registration Signal Mountain campground registration area with office and campground information Stay at the Signal Mountain Campground Signal Mountain Amphitheater Amphitheater with building and bench seats at campground Enjoy an evening program at the Signal Mountain Amphitheater Signal Mountain Campground RV Camper trailer with Jackson Lake and Mount Moran in the distance RVs up to 30 feet are welcome at the Signal Mountain Campground Signal Mountain Campground Tent in the Forest Campsite with a picnic table and an orange and red tent surrounded by lodgepole pines Campsite with Shade North Fork Cascade Canyon Backpackers in North Fork Cascade Canyon, Grand Teton behind Backpackers in North Fork Cascade Canyon approaching Paintbrush Divide. Winter Sunrise on the Teton Range Winter sunrise on snow-covered Teton Range Winter sunrise on snow-covered Teton Range Grizzly Bear Grizzly bear running through dry grass with shrubs behind Grizzly bears are found throughout Grand Teton National Park Lake Solitude with the Cathedral Group Lake Solitude with the high Teton Peaks beyond during summer Lake Solitude is a favorite hiking destination in the park. Oxbow Bend and Mount Moran Oxbow Bend on the Snake River during fall with golden aspens and Mount Moran in the background. Mount Moran at Oxbow Bend is a classic autumn view. Visitors at the Snake River Overlook Mother in pink shirt, child in orange shirt, the Snake River below and the Teton Range beyond. The Snake River Overlook is a where Ansel Adams took his iconic image of the Teton Range. John Moulton Barn at Mormon Row Historic Moulton Barn with visitors and the Teton Range beyond. Two Moulton brothers built adjacent icon barns on Mormon Row. John's barn is pictured. T.A., his brother, built a barn just to the south. American Pika (Ochotona princeps) American Pika perched on a granite boulder American Pika live in rockfall areas. Moose Bull moose with large antlers walking through fall grasses In the fall, bull moose antlers have lost their velvet readying for the rut. Schwabacher Landing beaver pond at Schwabacher landing reflecting the Teton Range in early summer The beaver ponds near Schwabacher Landing can produce beautiful reflections of the Teton Range. Arrowleaf Balsamroot yellow arrowleaf balsamroot blooms with Teewinot Peak towering beyond Arrowleaf Balsamroot is a bright splash of color during early summer. Faces of Aviation, Grand Teton National Park Short-Haul Program Faces of Aviation, Grand Teton National Park Short-Haul Program Park ranger peers out of helicopter while flying. Grand Teton National Park Fire Management Program Transfers Fire Engines to Rural Wyoming Fire Districts Grand Teton National Park Fire Management Program Transfers Fire Engines to Rural Wyoming Fire Districts Fire engine on a trailer ready to be transported Morgan State University Students Participate In Hands-On Historic Preservation Training Projects Morgan State University (MSU) students are participating in a program this summer that aims to bring young African American students working toward architecture degrees into historic preservation and related career paths. Touching History: Preservation in Practice is a program designed to raise awareness about the importance of historic preservation and conservation and engage a new generation of preservation professionals. Assistant Director David Vela talking to student Tribute: Gary L. Larson, Limnologist A remembrance of limnologist Gary L. Larson Gary Larson Tribute: Legacy of NPS historian Richard Sellars lives on in science-based park management programs A tribute to retired NPS historian Richard West Sellars Richard Sellars Fuels Treatments Proved Effective During the 2016 Berry Fire Mechanically treated areas and fire-adapted construction proved effective during the 2016 Berry Fire. No structures were lost, likely due in large part to the use of fire-adapted construction materials. Many trees in the area are expected to survive. Progression Map of Berry Fire Fuels Work Completed to Protect Popular Summit Road at Grand Teton National Park Combined efforts by NPS and Teton interagency fire crews, with support from other park divisions, led to the completion of an important fuels reduction project along Signal Mountain Summit Road in Grand Teton National Park in summer 2014. The intent was to provide for firefighter and public safety and to reduce fuels around sensitive communications structures and equipment on the summit, creating more fire-adapted communities. Hillside with open understory. Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. Moose Fire Offers Rare Opportunity for Managing Fire The two-acre Moose fire was discovered burning as high as 9,200-feet elevation on August 3, 2013 in Grand Teton National Park. Park management agreed to a monitoring strategy, as it offered a rare look at fire behavior in whitebark pine and spruce trees at such a high elevation, which is not well understood. The whitebark pines in the area were mostly dead from beetle infestation, so this area is a high priority for restoration of resilient landscapes. Bat Projects in Parks: Grand Teton National Park Explore what its like to live with bats in Grand Teton National Park! A little brown bat roosting with white fuzz on its muzzle NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] snowy peaks PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Providing for Firefighter Safety through Interagency Aviation Success The NPS is considering ways to improve provision of timely medical response to firefighters on remote wildland fires. Short-haul capable helicopters and crews are increasingly used, but extensive training is needed and safety mitigation practices must be standardized. rangers training for carrying a victim via helicopter short-haul Reynold Jackson Awarded Secretary’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to Aviation Safety For over 25 years Renny has been involved with the Service’s short-haul program used for search and rescue (SAR). His expertise and leadership has made Renny Jackson synonymous with short-haul both nationally and internationally. For his commitment to aviation safety and his life-time of devoted service, Renny Jackson is presented the Secretary’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to Aviation Safety. A smiling group of men and women stand behind a sign and in front of a ranger station. Wildland Fire History — Interpreting Fire In Grand Teton National Park Grand Teton NP naturalist briefly recounts wildfire history in the park, then offers effective interpretive strategies for during and after a fire and in advance of future fires. Original article published in 1989. Dude Ranching at Grand Teton National Park The rugged beauty of Grand Teton National Park has long attracted visitors in search of vacation or adventure, leaving a legacy of recreational features closely tied to the natural landscape. The White Grass Dude Ranch in Grand Teton National Park is one example of the dude ranching era in the Jackson Hole area. Today, although some historic landscape features have been removed, much of the ranch has been restored. It now serves as a historic preservation training facility. A single story log cabin with a bright green roof surrounded by sagebrush, trees, and mountains Pikas in Peril The National Park Service stewards pika populations in more than a dozen parks and seeks to understand the vulnerability of pikas and other mountain species to climate change. Pikas in Peril, funded in 2010, was a collaborative research program directed by scientists from the National Park Service, Oregon State University, University of Idaho, and University of Colorado-Boulder. Profile of a pika on rough, dark red lava rock. © Michael Durham Park Air Profiles - Grand Teton National Park Air quality profile for Grand Teton National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Grand Teton NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Grand Teton NP. Park visitor skiing in Teton Park, Grand Teton NP Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Recipe for Mountain Lake Conservation After a long hike through the mountains, nothing compares to the inspiring beauty of a healthy, colorful mountain lake. But airborne nitrogen pollution threatens the health and function of these alpine oases. man sits by mountain lake News and Notes YS-25-1 Dr. Fred Allendorf, professor emeritus at the University of Montana and member of the University’s Fish and Wildlife Genomics Group, has won the 2015 Molecular Ecology prize. This international award, bestowed annually by the journal Molecular Ecology, recognizes scientists for their significant contributions in this interdisciplinary field of research... Teton Interagency Fire Effects Crew Receives Regional USFS Award In June 2012, the Teton Interagency Fire Ecology/Fire Effects Program was honored with the 2011 Forest Service Intermountain Region Fire and Fuels Award. The Fire Effects crew monitors fire and vegetation effects within Grand Teton National Park and the Bridger-Teton National Forest. They collect information on wildland and prescribed fires, as well as mechanical fuels treatments to allow fire managers to determine the effectiveness of treatments and design better projects. "Know Before You Go" Campaign Spreads Like Wildfire Fire prevention and education staff of Grand Teton NP and Bridger-Teton NF used the slogan “Know BEFORE You Go” to encourage people to call ahead or check websites for fire restrictions before heading into the backcountry. The interagency group reached out in creative ways to make sure the public heard consistent fire restriction messages. Teton Interagency Fire now has messages and partnerships in place for a successful fire prevention campaign. Wildland Fire in Sagebrush Sagebrush will burn when the surrounding grasses are dry. With strong winds, fire spreads rapidly with flames sometimes reaching over 30 feet high. While fire easily kills sagebrush, the other plants resprout from protected roots producing lush forage for wildlife and livestock. Close-up of sagebrush leaves 2003 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2003 Environmental Achievement Awards Short-Haul-Capable Helicopter, Crew Performs Rescue at Grand Teton On August 27, 2013, a snag struck a Chena Hotshot assigned to the Kelley fire on the Sawtooth National Forest. Thanks to the short-haul-capable Teton Interagency helicopter and crew members, the hotshot was quickly rescued off the mountain and provided emergency medical care. Teton Interagency Opens New, Long-Awaited, Dispatch Center Teton Interagency Dispatch Center dispatchers moved into their long-awaited new facility in March 2013. The new center provides sufficient space for current staff and temporary summer detailers. The center supports Bridger-Teton National Forest, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming State Forestry, and three Wyoming counties, and can host expanded dispatch in the nearby larger conference room. Beaver Creek Administrative Area Historic District Cultural Landscape The Beaver Creek Administrative Area (also known as the Old Administrative complex) is located at the base of the foothills of the Teton Mountains. The area served as the park headquarters from 1929 to fall 1958. Grounded in 19th century romantic or pastoral ideals, this functional architecture contributed to natural settings in a visually pleasing and non‑intrusive manner. Characteristic features include the use of natural materials, appropriate scale, and simple forms. Deputy Superintendent's Residence (NPS) Jackson Lake Lodge Cultural Landscape Jackson Lake Lodge is located in the heart of Grand Teton National Park in northwestern Wyoming. Developed between 1953 and 1960, the Jackson Lake Lodge was the first major lodge complex designed in a modern style of architecture within the National Park System. Features of the Jackson Lake Lodge landscape, such as the guest cottages and parking lots, reflect important historical developments, such as the rise in visitation to national parks. Jackson Lake Lodge (C. Mardorf, NPS) Murie Ranch Cultural Landscape The Murie Ranch Historic District is located in Moose, Wyoming, within Grand Teton National Park. The property served not only as the setting for the writing of the Wilderness Act, but also as a place where the great minds in conservation science could converge in the seclusion of the Teton's great wilderness. The property is nationally significant for its association with the 20th century American conservation movement. Murie Ranch (Utah State University) Bar BC Dude Ranch Cultural Landscape The Bar BC Ranch is located on the west bank of the Snake River, a few miles north of Moose, Wyoming in the southern portion of Grand Teton National Park. As one of the area’s pioneer dude ranches, the Bar BC helped shape Jackson Hole’s character as a destination for nature-based tourism. Dance cabin, 2006 (Shapins Associates) Bison Conservation Initiative The 2008 BCI has been a touchstone for DOI bureaus for 12 years. The commitments made there have now resulted in meaningful technical products and organizational improvements that continue to advance the conservation of American bison. The Bison Working Group, established as a mechanism for implementing the 2008 BCI, quickly became a productive model of interagency collaboration. Federal professionals working in support of bison conservation note that today we enjoy an ... Bison Conservation Initiative Mormon Row Historic District Cultural Landscape The Mormon Row Historic District is located at the southeast corner of Grand Teton National Park in a gently sloping sheltered cove formed by Blacktail Butte and the Gros Ventre Mountains. The building clusters incorporate domestic and agricultural infrastructure and are constructed of locally procured materials. The district's community illustrates the extension of the "Mormon Culture Region" from Utah, Idaho, and Arizona, to interspersed communities throughout the West. Andy Chambers Homestead on Mormon Row, 2010 (C. Mardorf, NPS) White Grass Ranch Cultural Landscape The White Grass Dude Ranch is significant in conjunction with the Bar BC and JY ranches, as the three ranches helped define and set the standards for the local dude ranch industry in Jackson Hole. The ranch exemplifies the evolution and development of local cattle ranches into dude ranches. In 2003, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the NPS entered into an agreement to rehabilitate the White Grass Dude Ranch for use as a regional preservation training center. White Grass Ranch (White Grass Ranch: Cultural Landscapes Inventory, NPS, 2010) Women in Fire Science: Cynthia Worthington Cynthia Worthington is a fire effects monitor and has worked in several different units of the National Park Service during her career. The importance of collaboration with other fields and the built-in adaptability of fire programs is one of her favorite parts of working in fire that keeps her coming back. A woman in black rain gear stands with a clipboard in a meadow. Population Viability Study This study confirms that management of DOI bison herds in isolation promotes the loss of genetic diversity within all herds. More importantly, this study demonstrates that increased herd size and targeted removal strategies can reduce rates of diversity loss, and that adopting a Departmental metapopulation strategy through facilitated periodic movement of modest numbers of bison among DOI herds (i.e., restoring effective gene flow) can substantially reduce the... Bison Population Viability Study Sky Ranch Sky Ranch is associated with the settlement of the area, representing the later period of settlement in the Snake River valley, when families who had spent time at dude ranches and/or friends’ vacation homes in Grand Teton National Park. The buildings on the property are confined to domestic and agricultural uses. The ranch is a manifestation of the conservation ethic as practiced not by scientists, but by private individuals with a great love and respect for nature. Sky Ranch (Sky Ranch: Cultural Landscapes Inventory, NPS, 2011) Parks, pikas, and physiological stress: Implications for long-term monitoring of an NPS climate-sensitive sentinel species Baseline values of physiological stress can be incorporated into monitoring plans for pikas, providing park managers with additional information related to the vulnerability of this climate-sensitive model species that occurs within a large number of western parks. American pika (Copyright Dick Orleans) 4 Lazy F Ranch Cultural Landscape The 4 Lazy F Ranch is located on the west bank of the Snake River, just north of the park headquarters located at Moose in Grand Teton National Park, Teton County, Wyoming. Between 1927 and 1949, the Frew family enjoyed the ranch as a private family retreat, and made few additions to the ranch. The ranch buildings and several features share many of the characteristics of typical Rocky Mountain dude ranches, established during the first three decades of the 1900s. 4 Lazy F Ranch (NPS) Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Wildlife in the Badlands Ever wonder what kind of wildlife could survive the harsh climate of the Badlands? Two small, grey young lambs walk down brown badlands slope. Series: Research in Badlands National Park Scientists often look to the Badlands as a research subject. Many studies have been conducted in the park on a variety of topics, including paleontology, geology, biology, and archaeology. Learn more about these research topics in this article series. two researchers converse over a sheet of paper while a woman to their right uses a microscope. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Yellowstone Science - Volume 25 Issue 1: Native Fish Conservation In this edition of Yellowstone Science, we describe the significant progress that has already been made, along with the challenges that lie ahead as we continue our efforts to conserve native fish. As most of what occurs with fish lies under the surface of the water and largely out of sight, we hope that these articles will be revealing, enlightening, and increase understanding of the management approaches taken as we promote the restoration and preservation of native fish. Cover of YS 25-1 featuring a painting by Josh Udesen Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Scientist Profile: Andrew Ray, Ecologist Meet Andrew Ray, ecologist with the Greater Yellowstone Inventory & Monitoring Network! Andrew is fascinated by aquatic habitats and wetland plants. Learn about his favorite project studying the unique Crater Lake Manzama newt, and discover how he got to be where he is today. Scientist gestures to something in a fishing net as two people in NPS uniform observe. Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. Patterns of Pathogen Exposure in Gray Wolves Read the abstract and link to a new published article on wolf pathogens across North America: Brandell, E. E., P. C. Cross, M. E. Craft, D. W. Smith, E. J. Dubovi, ...B. L. Borg, M. Sorum, ... et al. 2021. Patterns and processes of pathogen exposure in gray wolves across North America. Scientific Reports 11: 3722. Aerial view of a wolf pack in the snow. Advancements in Analytical Approaches Improve Whitebark Pine Monitoring Results A recent evaluation of the monitoring protocol for whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem revealed limitations in the original analytical approach. Newer Bayesian hierarchical models corrected for these deficiencies by accounting for more factors influencing white pine blister rust prevalence, a key indicator of whitebark pine health. The study highlights the value of periodically re-evaluating monitoring protocols as new methods evolve. Whitebark pine tree in foreground with snow-capped mountains in back. Series: Water Resources Monitoring in the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, Wyoming The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water quality and analyzes river discharge in the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, WY, between April and November each year. The headwaters of the Snake River rise over Yellowstone National Park, meander in and out of Bridger-Teton National Forest, and then return to National Park Service land on the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. Water quality is high at this site. Our monitoring results are presented here and will be updated each year. A person standing in a evergreen tree lined river holding a bottle attached to a pole. Top 10 Tips for visiting Grand Teton National Park Planning a visit to Grand Teton National Park? Check out our top 10 tips and plan like a park ranger. Ranger and park visitors enjoy the park at sunset Series: Water Resources Monitoring in the Snake River at Moose, Wyoming Water quality in the Snake River headwaters is considered of very high quality and the river is valued for its natural, cultural, and recreational resources. The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water quality and analyzes river discharge in the Snake River above and below Jackson lake between April and November each year. Here, we present the results from the monitoring site below Jackson Lake at Moose, WY. We will update this site each year as new information is collected. A scientist operating a water monitoring crane on a bridge over a river Snake River Water Quality at Flagg Ranch, Wyoming Each year, we collect water from across the entire width of the river and at multiple depths to test for chemical and metal components. We also collect core water quality measurements, including water temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductance, pH, and turbidity. A scientist filling a water bottle from a larger container of water. Snake River Water Quality at Moose, Wyoming Each year, we collect water from across the entire width of the river and at multiple depths to test for chemical and metal components. We also collect core water quality measurements, including water temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductance, pH, and turbidity. A scientist standing in very shallow water holding a water quality probe The Snake River at Flagg Ranch, Wyoming The Snake River is the largest tributary of the Columbia River. The Monitoring site at Flagg Ranch, WY, is in the segment of the river designated as "wild" under the Snake Headwaters Legacy Act of 2009, an amendment of the 1968 Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. A river lined by snowy banks and evergreen trees and a moose on the shore Monitoring Methods for the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, Wyoming The Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors water resources in parks, including the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, WY, in John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. This long-term monitoring is based on peer-reviewed protocols. Read about our monitoring methods here and explore the protocols by clicking on the links at the bottom of the page. A closeup of a river's edge with an evergreen covered hill in the background Water Quality Criteria for the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, Wyoming Links to federal and state water quality standards that apply to the Snake River are found here. Bright blue water in a bending river lined by evergreen trees and a tree-covered hill. Water Flow in the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, Wyoming Daily flow measurements on the Snake River at Flagg Ranch, WY, are recorded from a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage. Most recent discharge results are presented here. The Snake River at Moose, Wyoming The Snake River is the largest tributary of the Columbia River. The monitoring site at Moose, WY, is below Jackson Lake in Grand Teton National Park. The entirety of the watershed for this part of the Snake River is located within federal lands. A flowing river lined by evergreen trees Water Flow in the Snake River at Moose, Wyoming Daily flow measurements on the Snake River at Moose, WY, are recorded from a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage. Most recent results of discharge on the river are presented here. A staff plate for measuring water height submerged in the edge of a river Monitoring Methods for the Snake River at Moose, Wyoming The Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors water resources in parks, including the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park. This long-term monitoring is based on peer-reviewed protocols. Read about our monitoring methods here and explore the protocols by clicking on the link at the bottom of the page. A cylindrical probe attached to a wire submerged in shallow water. Water Quality Criteria for the Snake River at Moose, Wyoming Links to federal and state water quality standards that apply to the Snake River are found here. A clipboard and river measurement equipment on the bank of a river with a bridge in the distance All Women Fire Crew Prepares for Season at Grand Teton National Park All Women Fire Crew Prepares for Season at Grand Teton National Park Title page: All Women Fire Crew Prepares for Season at Grand Teton National Park Cherry Payne: A Career of Commitment and Compromise When Cherry Payne was first interviewed by Dorothy Boyle Huyck in the 1970s, she was a young interpretive ranger at Grand Teton National Park at the start of her NPS career. In an oral history interview recorded in 2020, she reflected on where that career had taken her. Each step of the way, Payne balanced commitment with compromise as she made decisions about family life, professional life, and park management. Portrait of Cherry Payne in a house Checking in on the All Women's Fire Crew at Grand Teton National Park VIDEO: Checking in on the All Women's Fire Crew at Grand Teton National Park Checking in on the All Women's Fire Crew at Grand Teton National Park Staff Spotlight: Vanessa Torres Meet Vanessa Torres, Program Manager of Interpretation, Education, and Community Engagement for Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park and Waco Mammoth National Monument. Hear her story and advice she has for youth and young adults. Vanessa Torres enjoying a break in the Texas Bluebonnets Virtual Speaker for Women in Leadership Conference: Fire 2021 Women in Leadership Conference Fire 2021 Title page: Women And Leadership, Fire and Aviation Management
Y O U R G U I D E T O T H E PA R K • FALL 2018 Changes of Autumn The arrival of autumn breathes new life into Grand Teton National Park. As the heat of summer slowly gives way to the cooler months of fall, changes may be seen across the park. The bright green leaves of the aspens become vibrant yellow; the sun, once bright until late in the evening, sinks below the horizon earlier each day; cool breezes and frequent rain showers wash away the haze of summer. For many animals, fall is the time to migrate to their winter grounds. Bison, pronghorn, and elk begin moving south. Grand Teton is a corridor for many of these animals, and they follow the same path their ancestors took thousands of years before. Pronghorn gather in large groups to head for their winter grounds near Pinedale, WY. For nearly 7,000 years, members of the Teton herd have headed to the Pinedale area where they join one of the largest gatherings of pronghorn on earth. The 150-mile migration is the second longest land migration in the Western Hemisphere. see CHANGES OF AUTUMN on page 6 Bears in Fall Hawthorne, chokecherry, and other berries attract grizzly and black bears to feast on this vital food source. Park rangers will close roads, trails, and other areas if necessary for visitor safety due to bear activity and bear safety. BEAR AWARE As you travel through the park, please be “Bear Aware.” • • BEAR Stay at least 100 yards from BEAR bears and wolves. AWARE AWARE Jenny Lake Renewal The multi-million dollar renewal project at Jenny Lake is making headway—2018 marks the fifth and final major construction season. Work continues around the visitor center, general store, and restrooms. Backcountry work continues at Inspiration Point and Cascade Creek. WHAT TO EXPECT Trails—current info at visitor centers. Trails to Hidden Falls and a scenic viewpoint called Lower Inspiration Point are open. Cascade Canyon access is via north horse trail. Visitor Center—temporary facility with visitor information and bookstore sales. Open until Sept 23. General Store—sells camping and hiking supplies, groceries, gifts, and snacks. Open until Sept 23. Jenny Lake Campground—tents only. Open until Sept 30. multi-use pathway—unaffected by construction. Due to congestion, please begin from another location. Both black and grizzly bears can be dangerous. CARRY BEAR SPRAY • CARRY 25 yards (23 m) FOOD STORAGE REQUIRED Remain in your vehicle if bears are present. FOOD STORAGE • BEAR Hike in groups, make noise, and SPRAY REQUIRED 100 yards (91 m) carry bear spray. • Keep a clean camp and always store any product with an odor properly. 25 yards (23 m) 100 yards (91 m) Ranger Programs Join a ranger for a walk or a talk. See page 7-10 Make Your Splash! Looking for wildlife? 50th Anniversary of Wild & Scenic Rivers. Discover bears, pronghorn, elk, moose, bison, and more. See page 13 See page 4 Want to sleep under the stars? Campground and RV park information. See page 3 Grand Teton Guide Published By Grand Teton Association, a non-profit organization, dedicated to supporting the education, interpretive, and research initiatives of Grand Teton National Park. DISCOVER THE MAGNIFICENT LANDSCAPE AND WILD COMMUNITIES OF GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK, where the Teton Range rises abruptly from the high mountain valley known as Jackson Hole. From lush meadows and sage-covered floodplains to bare alpine rocks, the park is home to bald eagles, grizzly bears, river otters, and bison. If you have two hours or more... Grand Teton National Park Love to hike? Grab a map Want to see wildlife? Attracted to water? Paddle John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway and enjoy a short day hike or Go for a drive or hike to a a canoe, kayak or paddleboard Superintendent lakeshore walk. Get the Day popular wildlife viewing spot. on a lake (boat permit required) Hikes and Lakeshore Maps See page 4 for suggested or rent a boat. bulletin for more information places to catch a glimpse. David Vela Park Address Website Grand Teton National Park www.nps.gov/grandteton PO Box 170 Email Moose, WY 83012 grte_info@nps.gov Visitor Centers and Information Talk to a Ranger? To speak to a Grand Teton National and options. Like bicycling? Ride your Prefer a road tour? bicycle on the multi-use Are you curious? Join a Discover the vistas from Jenny pathway. You can walk, run, ranger-led program. Check out Lake Scenic Drive or the or rollerblade too. No dogs on the schedule on pages 7-10 or wildlife along the Moose- the multi-use pathway, except check at a visitor center. Wilson Road. service dogs. If you have a day... Park ranger call 307–739–3399 for visitor information. Want to hike? Grab a map Want to go on a drive? Interested in history? Explore and enjoy a day hike or take a Discover the vistas from the the historic districts at Menors park’s turnouts along the Teton Ferry, Mormon Row, and Road Information 307–739–3682 longer tr
Y O U R G U I D E T O T H E PA R K • SUMMER 2018 PHOTO COURTESY/ GRAND TETON LODGE COMPANY The sun begins to rise and the high peaks of the Teton Range reflect in the calm, still waters of the Snake River. Quietly and patiently the water begins cascading downstream. Once calm, now rushing, the water pulses swiftly through, crashing and sculpting the valley floor as it has for thousands of years. The river, the heart and soul of Grand Teton, amazing and strong, tranquil and serene, yet mighty and powerful, gives this park life. You will be amazed at what your river has to offer. Wild & Scenic Rivers Act Join the celebration! The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act turns 50 this year. The Act was created by Congress on October 2, 1968 to preserve rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a freeflowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations. Passage of the Craig Thomas Snake Headwaters Legacy Act in 2009 added 414 miles of rivers and streams in “The rivers flow not past, but through us. Thrilling, tingling, vibrating every fiber and cell of the substance of our bodies, making them glide and sing.” -John Muir the Jackson Hole area to the system. The Snake River Headwaters includes 13 rivers and 25 separate river segments in Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks; the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway; National Elk Refuge; Bridger-Teton National Forest; and small portions of state and private lands. The Snake River, which runs all the way through Grand Teton from north to south, consists of a 47-mile segment from its source to Jackson Lake, designated a wild river and a 24.8-mile segment from 1 mile downstream of Jackson Lake Dam to 1 mile downstream of the Teton Park Road • Trails to Hidden Falls and a scenic viewpoint called Lower Inspiration Point are open. • No flush toilets. • Limited parking, especially for buses, RVs, and trailers • Come early or arrive late to avoid crowds. See page 12 for more information. Gros Ventre Roundabout • Expect traffic delays 15-minute max delays 5 am–8 pm 30-minute max delays 8 pm–5 am • Construction delays should be considered in addition to busy seasonal traffic. See page 3 for more information. Be Safe, Go Slow, Be Aware Thank you for being patient as your park is renewed for the future. Want to learn more? Make your Splash! #makeyoursplash As you travel through Grand Teton National Park, reflect on what these wild and scenic rivers mean to you. Enjoy the recreational opportunities on the Snake River including fishing, kayaking, canoeing and rafting. View the river from scenic overlooks. Hike along the river and experience the sounds, tranquility, vistas, opportunities to view wildlife and so much more. See for yourself what your river has to offer. Share your experience with us at #makeyoursplash and #mygrandteton. Explore more about rivers Attend a ranger program about wild and scenic rivers, schedules on pages 7-10. Check out page 13 to learn more about Wild and Scenic Rivers. Jenny Lake Renewal Park Construction Jenny Lake bridge at Moose, designated a scenic river. Portions of the Buffalo Fork of the Snake River, Gros Ventre River, and Pacific Creek are also designated scenic rivers. The multi-million dollar renewal project at Jenny Lake is making headway—2018 marks the fifth and final major construction season. Work continues around the visitor center, general store, and restrooms. Backcountry work continues at Inspiration Point and Cascade Creek. WHAT TO EXPECT Trails—current info at visitor centers. Trails to Hidden Falls and a scenic viewpoint called Lower Inspiration Point are open. Cascade Canyon access is via north horse trail. Visitor Center—temporary facility with visitor information and bookstore sales. General Store—sells camping and hiking supplies, groceries, gifts, books, postcards, and snacks. Jenny Lake Campground—tents only. Multi-use Pathway—unaffected by construction. Due to congestion, please begin from another location. Looking for wildlife? Construction at the trailhead. Want to sleep under the stars? Check out a ranger program! Discover bears, pronghorn, elk, moose, bison, and more. Campground and RV park information. See pages 7-10 See page 4 See page 3 Grand Teton Guide Published By Grand Teton Association, a not-forprofit organization, dedicated to supporting the interpretive, scientific, and educational activities of Grand Teton National Park. DISCOVER THE MAGNIFICENT LANDSCAPE AND WILD COMMUNITIES OF GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK, where the Teton Range rises abruptly from the high mountain valley known as Jackson Hole. From lush meadows and sage-covered floodplains to bare alpine rocks, the park is home to bald eagles, grizzly bears, river otters, and bison. If you have two hours or more... Grand Teton National Park Love to hike? Grab a map Prefer a road tour? Attracted to water? Paddle John D. Rockefeller, Jr Memorial Parkway and enjoy a short day hike or
Grand Teton Your guide to the park Winter 2017-2018 Y O U R G U I D E T O T H E PA R K • SPRING 2018 Discover your path EX PL O R I N G T H E PA R K I N S P R I N G The world awakens from the grips of the long, Wyoming winter. As the winter’s snowpack melts – the land is signaled by birth and renewal. Plants emerge from dormancy; animals rouse from hibernation and migrants return to their summer home-range. You will be amazed with what you’ll discover as spring’s secrets of life return to the Teton Range and the Jackson Hole valley. Multi-use Pathway One way to explore springs' awakening is to journey on the park’s Multi-use Pathway. The 17-mile, separated pathway parallels the valley highways stretching from south boundary of the park to Moose, Jenny Lake and the Antelope Flats road. The pathway connects to the town of Jackson and beyond at the south boundary. The Multi-use Pathway enables travelers to use nonmotorized forms of transportation—including bike, hike, and skate—to explore the communities of the valley floor. The pathway is closed from dawn to dusk. Pets and stock animals are not allowed. As elsewhere in the park, pathway explorers must exercise practices that help wildlife thrive. Valley Trails As winter relinquishes its grip on the land, valley trails are the first to emerge from the blankets of winter’s snow. Conditions vary annually with snow usually melting from valley trails by mid-June. Trails in the southern portion of the Jackson Hole valley melt-out sooner than the northern valley trails. Patches of snow, boggy trails and downed trees makes for challenging navigation; waterproof shoes recommended. Hike with respect and reverence. Be a savvy hiker. Wildlife is under stress after the long winter and are beginning to rear young. Do not approach or feed Gros Ventre Roundabout animals. Observe them from a safe distance—100 yards from bears and wolves, and 25 yards from all other wildlife! Be aware of bears! Avoid surprising bears by making noise. Carry bear spray and know how to use it. Follow food storage rules. Carry drinking water and extra food. Bring rain gear and expect rapid changes in the weather. 1Taggart Lake – 3.0 mile round-trip hike with 350 feet elevation gain. The trail traverses sagebrush flats and forests to Taggart Lake with views of the Grand Teton. Start at the Taggart Lake Trailhead. 2Phelps Lake - 6.3 miles round trip hike with 5 600 feet total climbing. Hike around Phelps Lake with stunning views of the Teton Range. Start at the LSR Preserve Center. 3Leigh Lake - 1.8 mile round trip hike with less than 40 feet ascent. Hike along the east shore of String Lake; pass the bridge across a stream to Leigh Lake. Start at the Leigh Lake Trailhead. 4 Jenny Lake Loop - 7.2 miles loop hike with about 450 feet in elevation gain. Walk along a glacial moraine to view a glacially carved lake and canyon. Trail reroutes and closures are in effect—check at a visitor center for more information. Access the trail from South Jenny Lake or String Lake Trailhead 5Hermitage Point Trail from Colter 3 4 1 2 Bay – 9.7 miles round trip with 700 feet gain in elevation. Trail passes Heron Pond and Swan Lake through diverse communities of forest, meadows and wetlands rich with wildlife. Start at the Hermitage Point Trailhead. Looking for wildlife? Safety Improvements: Expect delays Discover bears, pronghorn, elk, moose, bison, and more. See page 3 See page 4 Want to sleep under the stars? Campground and RV Park Information See page 3 Grand Teton Guide Published By Grand Teton Association, a not-for-profit organization, dedicated to supporting the interpretive, scientific and educational activities of Grand Teton National Park. Superintendent David Vela Park Address Phone Grand Teton National Park 307-739-3300 PO Box 170 Moose, WY 83012 Email Website grte_info@nps.gov www.nps.gov/grandteton Visitor Centers and Information DISCOVER THE MAGNIFICENT LANDSCAPE AND WILD COMMUNITIES OF GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK, where the Teton Range rises abruptly from the high mountain valley known as Jackson Hole. From lush meadows and sage-covered floodplains to bare alpine rocks, the park is home to bald eagles, grizzly bears, river otters, and bison. Plan for variable weather and snow-covered trails when visiting Grand Teton National Park during spring. Most park concessioners and visitor centers open during May. Stop by a visitor center for recommendations and more information. when hiking and plan for weather that may change rapidly and without warning. In May, the average high temperature is 61°F with a night time low of 31°F. Snowfall averages two inches, total precipitation averages two inches, and thunderstorms are possible! Sensory exhibits and orientation to an eight-mile trail network. PARK ROADS LODGING & CAMPGROUNDS Opens June 2 from 9am–5pm. 307-739-3654. Most park roads will be open in May. The Signal Mountain Summit Road opens when the snow melts. See map
PHOTO COURTESY DAVID BOWERS Grand Teton Your guide to the park Winter 2017-2018 BIG POWDER STAYING SAFE IN THE BACKCOUNTRY The thrill of fresh, big powder snow in winter causes a sense of excitement for many people. Perhaps nothing is more exhilarating than carving mystic tracks on the powder-covered slopes of the Teton Range. The powder snow that flies here is some of the lightest and driest on the planet. Mountains seem wilder and bigger when covered in a sparkling white world of frozen water. Here and throughout the western states, we look to winter and the mountains as the powder ('paů-dər): light, dry, newly fallen snow with a low moisture content, typically 4–7% water content. Powder snow is prized by skiers and snowboarders. reservoirs for the following year’s water supply. Water is life for all living things and provides not only sustenance for the park’s flora and fauna but also for agricultural interests down- river. The winter snows provide recreation from skiing and snowboarding to summer rafting, kayaking and fishing. Density of snow landing on the Teton Range depends on its water content, the percentage of snow that is frozen or liquid water versus the amount of air. Teton Range snow is considered light and dry with water content often in the 7 see BIG POWDER on page 3 Winter Wildlife Winter poses challenges for all wildlife. Snow buries food, temperatures plummet, and traveling through deep snow is difficult and tiring. Wildlife survive the harsh winter by adapting. Some animals migrate, some hibernate, and some simply endure. Enjoy watching the wildlife in the park, but be respectful and don’t add to their challenges. BEARS? Bears usually hibernate from December into Roadside viewing is popular, but please keep the road clear. Use pullouts or pull completely off the roadway to the right of the white line. It is illegal to feed any wildlife—birds, ground squirrels, bears, or foxes. Wildlife start to depend on people resulting in poor nutrition and aggressive behavior. If fed, any animal may become unhealthy, bite you, expose you to rabies, or need to be killed. 25 yards (23 m) Always maintain a distance of at least 100 yards from bears and wolves, and 25 yards from other wildlife. Winter Closures To protect wildlife during this stressful season, the park closes key habitat areas to all travel. Areas around Snake River, Buffalo Fork River & Kelly Warm Springs: December 100 15–March yards31 (91 m) Use binoculars or a spotting scope for a good view. Never position yourself Summits of Mount Hunt, Prospectors Mountain & Static between a female and offspring—mothers are very protective. Let wildlife thrive Peak: December 1–March 31 undisturbed. If your actions cause an animal to flee, you are too close. See map on back page. March—timing varies based on weather and food. Carry Bear Spray just in case. 25 yards (23 m) 100 yards (91 m) Want to snowshoe with history? Cross-country skiing? Scare, Don't Stare Explore the park on a ranger guided snowshoe hike. Discover the miles of skiing trails in the park. Have you seen a red fox in the park lately? See page 3 See page 4-5 See page 6 Grand Teton Guide Published By Grand Teton Association, a not-forprofit organization, dedicated to supporting the interpretive, scientific and educational activities of Grand Teton National Park. DISCOVER THE MAGNIFICENT LANDSCAPE AND WILD COMMUNITIES OF GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK, where the Teton Range rises abruptly from the high mountain valley known as Jackson Hole. From snow covered peaks and frozen lakes to flat plains, the park is home to bald eagles, grizzly bears, river otters, bison, and more. If you have two hours or more... Grand Teton National Park Love the snow? Grab a map Want to see wildlife? road after November 1. In the John D. Rockefeller, Jr Memorial Parkway and enjoy a short day ski or Drive the Gros Ventre Road spring when the snow melts Superintendent snowshoe. See page 4 for to Kelly to find moose and you can ride the closed road trails and information. bison. Search for owls and until April 30. You can walk, other wildlife along the run, roller blade, or walk your Moose-Wilson Road from dog too. Bikes and fat bikes are Moose to Death Canyon. not allowed on snow covered David Vela Park Address Website Find a frozen lake. When Grand Teton National Park www.nps.gov/grandteton the ice is thick, you can walk PO Box 170 Email on water and take in the Moose, WY 83012 grte_info@nps.gov stunning Teton Range from Like bicycling? Until snow a glacier carved lake. Avoid covers the Teton Park Road you inlets and outlets. can ride your bike on the closed Visitor Centers and Information roads or pathways. If you have a day... Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center Information, park film, exhibits, permits, bookstore. Opens March 5 for the 2018 season. Jackson Hole-Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center Information, exhibits, and elk sleigh r
Grand Teton Guide The official newspaper of Grand Teton National Park & John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Centennial Celebration, August 20–28 A Centennial Celebration, August 20-28 The Grand Rescue Join the filmmakers and the 1967 rescue team for a screening of The Grand Rescue and a discussion of their experience. Monday, August 22 Tickets required. See inside for details. John Muir: University of the Wilderness Chance Urban Chamber Music Thursday, August 25 Centennial Children’s Choir Celebration Singing Angels Choir Friday, August 26 Explore the park with the new NPS Grand Teton app. Search for NPS Grand Teton on the Apple App Store or Google Play Store. Publication of the Centennial Edition of the Grand Teton Guide is made possible through the generous support of the Grand Teton Association. Grand Teton Guide Centennial Edition Founder’s Week Highlights The Grand Rescue Monday, August 22, 2016 marks the 49th anniversary of an unprecedented rescue on the North Face of the Grand Teton. Join the filmmakers and the 1967 rescue crew for a screening of The Grand Rescue and a discussion of their experience. In 1967, on the Grand Teton, seven rescuers risked their lives to save a severely injured climber and his companion. The rescue was the first one on the feared North Face—an unprecedented rescue for its time, due to the climber’s severe injuries and unknown terrain. The rescue took three harrowing days, pushed the team to the edge of their abilities, and cemented a lifelong bond. Looking back after nearly 50 years, the rescuers and survivors recount the trial with unabashed candor. The Grand Rescue humbles us to the majestic Grand Teton, exposes the tenuous relationship of man and the mountain, reveals the endurance of the human spirit, and recounts one of the most infamous rescues of its time. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center Auditorium, Moose Monday, August 22 from 5 to 7 pm Free, but tickets required. www.eventbrite.com search Grand Rescue Join an earlier screening from 3 to 4 pm without the accompanying discussion. Members of the 1967 Rescue Team are from left to right: Ted Wilson, Pete Sinclair, Ralph Tingey, Mike Ermarth, Rick Reese and Bob Irvine. No tickets required. This Land is Our Land: The Stephen T. Mather Story John Muir: University of the Wilderness Learn how the first director of the National Park Service set the course for preserving the public lands we enjoy today. This pioneering business man turned his talents to public service ensuring that all people could enjoy these iconic places and experience America’s heritage. 45 minute program. Chance Urban Chamber Music invites you to take a walk in the woods with the words of John Muir. University of the Wilderness celebrates and reflects on Muir’s words with an accompanying score of nature-inspired music. The goal of the performance is to reflect on the man, his indomitable spirit and his daring and adventurous nature. This group of musicians is performing at multiple national parks during the National Park Service’s Centennial year. Colter Bay Amphitheater, Colter Bay Village Tuesday, August 23 & Thursday, August 25 at 9 pm Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center Auditorium, Moose Thursday, August 25 at 1:30 pm Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center, Moose Thursday, August 25 from 5 to 6 pm Centennial Children’s Choir Celebration The Singing Angels will perform Children’s Earth Anthem, a song composed and written by Charles Eversole and Louise Phillips for the National Park Service Centennial. They will also sing other national park-inspired songs. The Children’s Earth Anthem is being performed by groups of children in hundreds of other National Park Service sites across the country throughout 2016. Colter Bay Amphitheater, Colter Bay Village Friday, August 26 from 7 to 8 pm Other Highlights August 25–28 Fee-free days! Entrance fees to Grand Teton and all national parks are waived. August 24 7 pm The Cougar Fund presents Predators of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Colter Bay Amphitheater, Colter Bay Village August 25 FOUNDER’S DAY – The National Park Service turns 100! All Day – Look for photo booths, Instagram frames, and special ranger activities throughout the park. Noon – Birthday Cake at each Visitor Center 7 pm Ken Thomasma – Historian, Storyteller & Author Colter Bay Amphitheater, Colter Bay Village Grand Teton Guide Centennial Edition 2 Ranger Programs August 20-28 Join park rangers for regularly scheduled & special centennial programs. Use the following icons to help guide your program choices: Special Program Offering Read about events at various park areas on the next pages. Accessible Program Check at visitor centers for additional programs! Moose Ranger Programs Event Description Taggart Lake Hike Hike with a ranger along the scenic trail to Taggart Lake, where a variety of stories unfold. Topics may include geology, fire eco
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Backcountry Camping The North Fork of Cascade Canyon Danielle Lehle photo Before Leaving Home Weather Planning Your Trip This guide provides general information about backcountry use in Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. The map on the back page is only for general trip planning and/or campsite selection. For detailed information, use a topographic map or hiking guide. When planning your trip, consider each member of your party. Backpackers should expect to travel no more than 2 miles per hour, with an additional hour for every 1,000 feet of elevation gain. Do not plan to cross more than one mountain pass in a day. If you only have one vehicle, you may want to plan a loop trip. There is no shuttle service in the park, but transportation services are available; ask at a permits desk for more information. The high country is busiest in July and August due to less snow. Jackson Lake is busiest on weekends and holidays. Getting A Permit Permits are required for all overnight backcountry stays in the park and parkway. To minimize the impact on park resources, backcountry permits are limited. One-third of the backcountry campsites and all of the group sites may be reserved in advance. The remaining sites are filled on a first-come, first-served basis at park permit offices no more than one day before the trip begins. Plan alternative routes based on availability. Fees $35 walk-in permit per trip. $45 advance reservation per trip. This fee covers the reservation and permit. Reservations Backcountry camping is very popular, and reservations are recommended. You may secure an on-line reservation between early January and May 15th. For online reservations go to: www.recreation.gov and search for Grand Teton National Park. The system will allow you to choose available sites and dates in real-time. Call 307-739-3309 for more information. Picking Up Your Permit A reservation holds your permit but is NOT your permit. Pick up your reserved permit before 10 am the morning your trip begins or your campsites will be released. If you will be late, you may call to inform us. If you will not be using your permit, please cancel your reservation as soon as possible. During summer, pick up permits at the Craig Thomas and Colter Bay visitor centers or at the Jenny Lake Ranger Station. All permits involving technical climbing or mountaineering and any permit for Garnet Canyon must be picked up at the Jenny Lake Ranger Station when they are open (early June through early September). During winter, call 307-739-3309 for more information. Backcountry Safety Video Before you pick up your permit, you will be required to watch a backcountry safety video. Please visit the backcountry website (www.nps.gov/grte/planyourvisit/back.htm or ask at a permits office for more information. Group Size Individual campsites accommodate one to six people. Groups of seven to 12 people must use designated group sites that are larger and more durable. In winter, parties are limited to 20 people. Backcountry Conditions Snow conditions vary annually. Snow usually melts from valley trails, by midJune but remains in parts of the high country through summer. Safe travel over Paintbrush, Static Peak and Moose Basin divides and Hurricane, Mt. Meek and Fox Creek passes may require an ice axe and knowledge of its use into August. Climbing and Mountaineering Permits are not required for day climbs. Climbers planning to stay in the backcountry overnight must have a permit to camp or bivouac. Current information is available at the Jenny Lake Ranger Station in the summer 307-739-3343. In winter, call 307-739-3309. Check for conditions at www.tetonclimbing.blogspot.com. From early June through early September, pick up all permits for Garnet Canyon or any trip involving technical climbing or mountaineering at the Jenny Lake Ranger Station. Boating Register all vessels annually with the park. Purchase permits at the Craig Thomas, Colter Bay or Jenny Lake (cash only) visitor centers. Lakeshore campsites are located on Jackson and Leigh lakes. Camping is not allowed along the Snake River. Strong afternoon winds occur frequently. For specific information regarding the use of watercraft, ask for the Boating brochure. Stock Use Horses, burros, mules and llamas may be used on some established trails; some trails are closed to stock. There are special campsites and rules for overnight stock use. Ask for the Stock Use brochure. Hikers should expect to encounter stock. Yield to stock by stepping well off the trail on the uphill side. Wait quietly until stock passes. Stay Limits Campers may stay in a camping zone or designated site for two consecutive nights. The limit is three nights on Jackson Lake. Between June 1 and September 15, campers are limited to ten nights in the backcountry. In winter, ca
Grand Teton Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Bicycling Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway ofer more than 100 miles of paved roads and a multi-use pathway that provides spectacular views of the rugged Teton Range. Rules and Regulations • Bicyclists must obey all trafc laws and signs. • Bicycles are allowed on paved and unpaved roads open to motorized vehicles, unless otherwise posted. • Between sunset and sunrise an operator or bicycle must have a white light or refector that is visible from at least 500 feet to the front, and a red light or refector that is visible from at least 200 feet to the rear. • Bicycles are allowed on the multi-use pathway from dawn to dusk only. • Bicycles are NOT allowed on trails or in backcountry areas. • In the park, operating a bicycle abreast of another bicycle is prohibited. • The use of personal audio devices is strongly discouraged. • Notify other recreators before passing. Yield to slower users. • Helmets and bright-colored clothes are recommended due to heavy trafc. • Pets are not allowed on the multi-use pathway. Wildlife The multi-use pathway and roads pass through a variety of wildlife habitats. Users must be prepared for wildlife encounters. Never feed, approach OR harass wildlife—especially large mammals. Stay at least 100 yards from bears and wolves and 25 yard from other wildlife. Maintain control of your speed and stay aware of your surroundings. Never leave food unattended including backpacks and bike panniers. Follow food storage regulations. Travel in groups if possible. Carry and know how to use bear spray. Weather • Spring (April-June) Days are cool and cloudy with rain showers and occasional snow. • Summer (July-August) Weather is generally good for bicycling with mid-day temperatures around 80 degrees. Afternoon thunder showers may form quickly with heavy, cold rain and dangerous lightning. • Fall (September-early October) Days are often clear and cool, but rain and snow showers frequently occur. ROAD BIKING Multi-use Pathway Paved pathway heads north from Jackson paralleling US 26/89/191 to Antelope Flats Road. At Moose Junction follow the Teton Park Road to South Jenny Lake. Open to non-motorized users from dawn to dusk. E-bikes with fully functional pedals (<1 h.p.) are allowed. The FOOD section of the pathway from Jackson to Gros STORAGE REQUIRED Ventre Junction is closed from November 1 to April 30 for elk migration. Jenny Lake Scenic Loop (One-Way) Access this 7-mile loop from South Jenny Lake. Ride north along the Teton Park Road 3 miles, turn left at North Jenny Lake Junction, and left again on the “one-way” Jenny Lake scenic road with a striped lane for stunning views of the Teton Range. As the road turns away from the lake, veer right onto a paved pathway to return to South Jenny Lake. Antelope Flats – Kelly Area Secondary paved roads wind through sagebrush fats with spectacular views of the Teton Range. MOUNTAIN BIKING Two Ocean Lake Road Three miles of dirt road lead from Pacifc Creek Road to Two Ocean Lake for a scenic ride over rolling terrain. Grassy Lake Road Travel an old American Indian route through the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. Ride all or part of the 52-mile dirt road from Flagg Ranch to Ashton, ID. Outside the Park Venture into the surrounding Bridger-Teton National Forest for additional adventures. For information about area trails such as Shadow Mountain, Teton Pass, Snow King or Cache Creek inquire at area bicycle shops. Wildlife and Weather BEAR AWARE Recommended Bicycling Routes AR ARE OD AGE RED National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior KEEP FOOD STORED Warning Use caution when cycling in the park. Some roads have paved, marked shoulders providing limited access for safe bicycling. Some roads have very narrow shoulders or lack them altogether. Narrow unpaved roads become extremely dusty during dry weather. Ride single fle on the right side of the road and be alert for vehicles. Trafc is heavy during the summer, with daily peaks mid morning to late afternoon. Road construction and repairs occur every year. Be prepared for delays and rough roads. RENTALS Bicycles can be rented at Dornans in Moose, or in the nearby towns of Jackson and Teton Village.
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Boating C4" 11111w!Pl11111111111111m11111mnumr\'.:: 1111111111 €) Port (left) side, stern (back) Port (left) side, stern (back) Permits and Fees Privately owned vessels (including stand-up paddle boards) must register each year with Grand Teton National Park. Purchase permits at the Craig Thomas and Colter Bay visitor centers. Park Permit Fees: Motorized boat $40 Non-motorized boat $12 The permit sticker must be placed on the port (left) side of the vessel, approximately one foot forward of the stern (back). State registration for motorized vessels is required prior to obtaining a park permit. Motorized Boats Motor boats are only allowed on Jackson and Jenny lakes. On Jenny Lake, motors may not exceed 10 horsepower, except by boating concessioners. Aquatic Invasive Species ~-••, ~ ~ 11111 Equipment Prohibited Operations Non-Motorized Boats Human-powered vessels are permitted on Jackson, Jenny, Phelps, Emma Matilda, Two Ocean, Taggart, Bradley, Bearpaw, Leigh and String lakes, and on the Snake River 1,000 feet below the Jackson Lake Dam. Stand up paddle boards (SUPs) require a park permit. Only human-powered rubber rafts, canoes, dories and kayaks may be operated on the Snake River within the park and parkway. All other waters within the park and parkway are closed to watercraft, including Pacifc Creek, Bufalo Fork, Cottonwood Creek and the Gros Ventre River. • Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are an increasing concern. Many bodies of water are already contaminated. Clean, drain, and dry boats, boots, and waders before entering a new body of water. • Park inspection stations at Moose and Moran. • Never empty containers of bait, fsh, plants or animals into park waters. • Any watercraft transported into Wyoming March 1–November 30 requires boat inspection prior to launch, and the purchase of an AIS decal. Infatable craft less than 10 feet long are exempt. • Purchase decals at many fshing gear stores, or online: wgfd.wyo.gov. • AIS Fees Non-motorized Motorized Resident $5 $10 Non-resident $15 $30 Required Equipment All vessels must meet U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) requirements including: • Lifesaving Equipment All vessels must carry a USCG approved personal fotation device (PFD) of the appropriate size for each person on board. PFDs must be accessible and in good working condition. PFDs should be worn while boating. All passengers under 13 years old must wear a PFD whenever a vessel is underway or be within an enclosed cabin. • Lights Every vessel must use navigation lights when underway from sunset to sunrise. • Fire Extinguisher All motorboats must have at least the minimum number of portable fre extinguishers required by the USCG. • Signaling Devices All motorized watercraft shall have an efcient sound producing device on board. All federal and state boating regulations apply. • Operating jet skis on park waters. • Operating while under the infuence of alcohol or drugs. • Operating a vessel in excess of 5 mph or creating a wake in areas designated “No wake; speed 5 mph”. • Operating in a reckless or negligent manner, or in a manner that is likely to endanger any other person or property. • Operating motorized craft within 100 feet of other watercraft, for example, approaching canoes closer than 100 feet. • Operating while any person is riding on the gunwales, transom or on the decking over the bow while the vessel is underway. • Operating a vessel that exceeds a noise level of 82 decibels measured at a distance of 82 feet. • Carrying passengers for hire or performing any other commercial operation within the park or parkway without Superintendent's authorization. • Operating within 500 feet of any designated swimming area, except within marked channels, where slow speed must be maintained. • Operating a vessel within 100 feet of a diver’s marker, downed skier or swimmer. • Leaving any vessel unattended outside a designated mooring or beaching areas for more than 24 hours without prior written permission from the Superintendent. Any vessel so left may be impounded. • Overnight mooring or beaching of boats on the shore of a designated harbor area, except in an emergency. Suggested Equipment • Waste Receptacle All vessels should have a waste receptacle aboard. Dispose of trash in garbage cans or dumpsters. Draining, dumping, or discharging wastes or refuse, including human waste, into park or parkway waters is prohibited. • Oars All boats shorter than 16 feet should be equipped with oars or paddles as a second means of propulsion. • Bailing Bucket All boats should carry a bailing bucket in addition to bilge pumps and automatic bailers. Important Information BEAR AWARE FOOD STORAGE REQUIRED Accidents Report collisions, accidents, fres or other incidents that results in property loss, property damage, personal injury or death to a park ranger immediately. Each
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Cross-Country Skiing & Snowshoeing Experience the stark silence and exhilaration of winter travel in Grand Teton National Park through cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Snow provides an excellent backdrop for winter wildlife viewing and tracking. Proper preparation and planning ensures a safe and enjoyable winter experience. Hypothermia Hypothermia is caused by exposure to cold and is aggravated by wind and wet clothing. Warning signs include: uncontrollable shivering, reduced coordination and incoherent speech. Get the victim inside as soon as possible. If necessary, seek medical attention. Moose–Wilson Road TRAILHEAD ACCESS Areas closed to protect wildlife • Snake River bottom from Moose north to Moran Junction (Dec. 15 – April 1) • Bufalo Fork of the Snake River, Kelly Hill, Uhl Hill, and Wolf Ridge (Dec. 15 – April 1) • Static Peak above 10980 feet, Prospectors Mountain, and south-facing slopes on Mount Hunt above 8580 feet, including peaks 10988, 10905, and 10495 (Dec. 1 – April 1) • The Banana Couloir on Prospectors Mountain is open. Phelps Lake Overlook Death Canyon Trailhead 1 .6 From Moose: Drive three miles south of the CTDVC on the Moose-Wilson Road to the gate at the Death Canyon Road. Park on the west (right) side of the road. From Teton Village: Drive north from Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, enter the park and continue north for one mile. Park at the Granite Canyon Trailhead. m i PHELPS LAKE To Teton Village 8m 0. Phelps Lake Overlook (from north) • Moderate, 5.2 miles round-trip, total climbing: 730 feet. Phelps Lake (from north) • Moderate, 4.0 miles round-trip, total climbing: 300 feet. Moose–Wilson Road • Easy, 5.8 miles round-trip, total climbing: 500 feet. North 1.0 mi mi Contact Information • General Park 307-739-3399 • Backcountry Permits 307-739-3309 • Grooming 307-739-3682 • Pets are restricted to the following unplowed roadways: Teton Park Road and Moose-Wilson Road. • Pets must be restrained on a leash (six feet or less) within 30 feet of roadway. • Properly dispose of your pet's waste. Check at the trailheads for Mutt-Mitt stations. • Overnight backcountry campers must obtain a free camping permit. For more information call 307-739-3309. • Winter conditions stress animals. Harassing wildlife is prohibited. Maintain a distance of at least 100 yards from bears and wolves and 25 yards from other large animals. 1.2 Regulations Etiquette • Do not walk or snowshoe on ski trails. • Leave your skis on and side-step down or detour around steep sections. • Snowshoe parallel to the ski track. • Yield to faster skiers. • Step out of the track for a break. i i ad ) er Mo 0.5 (cl ose m os ed - Wi in lso th n ew R in o t Take the following items with you: • Water and high energy snack food • First aid kit including space blanket • Extra clothing, hat, mittens or gloves • Sunscreen and sunglasses • Map, compass, watch or other navigational aids • Headlamp and repair kit Avalanche Hazard Avoid known avalanche paths. All skiers and climbers traveling in avalanche terrain should be equipped with, and know how to use, an avalanche beacon, probe pole and shovel. For the Bridger-Teton National Forest Avalanche Center current weather forecast and avalanche hazard advisory call 307-733-2664 or check: www.jhavalanche.org 1.1 mi Please note: Winter trails are neither marked nor fagged. Please travel with care. In case of emergency call 911. • Use caution skiing on frozen surfaces. • Tell someone your plans. 1.2 mi Safety & Etiquette Granite Canyon Trailhead To Moose Taggart Lake Area (South Trailhead) JENNY LAKE North Jenny Lake Trail The road is machine groomed for both classic and skate skiing. One lane is designated as multi-use for walking and snowshoeing or anyone with a dog on a leash. The other lane is designated as a ski-only track. Snowmobiles are prohibited on the Teton Park Road (other than administrative use). Park Road Teto n Please respect other trail users by using each track appropriately. The groomed section of the Teton Park Road is 14 miles long. Bridge: Lucas-Fabian i 0.5 m Bradley Lake SOUTH TRAILHEAD (Taggart Lake TH) The Taggart Lake parking area is three miles northwest of Moose on the Teton Park Road. Bridge: Highlands 0 i 1.3 mi m .7 Taggart Lake Jenny Lake Trail • Easy, 8.0 miles round-trip, total climbing: 200 feet. Return via Teton Park Road Trail to make a loop. Taggart Lake–Beaver Creek • Moderate to difcult. Taggart Lake out-andback, 3.0 miles round-trip, total climbing: 400 feet. Taggart Lake–Beaver Creek Loop, 4.0 miles round-trip, total climbing: 500 feet. These trails traverse steep hills created by glacial moraines. 2.6 mi Bridge: Lupine Meadows ood Cree k The Teton Park Road is closed to vehicles during winter from Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. Located a
Driving Tour Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Ranger Station SelfGuiding Trailhead Photo Spot Wildlife Viewing As you drive, keep them alive! Every year drivers kill more than 100 large animals, causing property damage and personal injury. Drive cautiously at or below the posted speed limit. Need more information? NPS Grand Teton App Available on AppStore and Google Play. Locate your favorite trailhead, learn about a historic district, find a place to eat or take a guided tour. Your guide to the park! Highway 89/191 – South to North Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center (Teton Park Road) Stop by the striking visitor center in Moose. Watch the park film and explore the interactive natural and cultural history exhibits. Ask a ranger about what to see and do in the park or join a ranger-led activity. Mormon Row Historic District Antelope Flats / Gros Ventre Loop Turn east onto Antelope Flats Road 1 mile north of Moose Junction. Mormon Row is 1.5 miles east of the highway. Tour iconic historic barns and homesteads. Continue east and then south to the town of Kelly. Return to the highway on the Gros Ventre River Road. Look for pronghorn, deer, moose, bald eagles and bison. Snake River Overlook Stop at this turnout for spectacular views of the Teton Range. Ansel Adams took his icon photo of the Snake River and Teton Range from this site. Cunningham Cabin Historic Site Take a self-guided walk through the oldest historic building remaining in the park. Learn about the challenges of homesteading and look for badgers and coyotes hunting in the nearby meadows. Oxbow Bend Turnout Located 1 mile east of Jackson Lake Junction, a meander of the Snake River attracts wildlife including, moose, beaver, river otters, osprey and American white pelicans. Mount Moran provides a backdrop for a classic photo opportunity. Willow Flats Overlook Stop at the turnout 6 miles south of Colter Bay for a view of extensive wetlands and meadows providing excellent habitat for birds, beaver, elk and moose with views of Jackson Lake and the Teton Range. Teton Park Road – North to South Colter Bay Visitor Center (Highway 89/191) Enjoy the all new American Indian arts exhibit or meet a guest artist. Take a short stroll on one of the trails along Jackson Lake. Ask a ranger about what to see and do in the park or join a ranger-led activity. Jackson Lake Dam One mile west of Jackson Lake Junction, Jackson Lake Dam raises the level of Jackson Lake a maximum of 39 feet. Under the reservoir is a natural lake up to 400 feet deep carved by an immense glacier that once flowed off the Yellowstone Plateau. Enjoy views of Mt. Moran. Signal Mountain Summit Road This 5-mile drive turns east 1 mile south of Signal Mountain Lodge. This windy road climbs almost 1,000 feet above the valley floor to the summit. Two overlooks provide panoramic views of the Teton Range and Jackson Lake. The road is narrow and parking is limited. Trailers are prohibited. North Jenny Lake Scenic Drive Turn west at North Jenny Lake Junction onto a 4-mile, 1-way scenic drive. Stop for a hike or picnic at the Leigh / String Lake trailheads, or enjoy the Jenny Lake overlook. Jenny Lake Lodge is along the way. South Jenny Lake / Hidden Falls & Inspiration Point The Jenny Lake Visitor Center is currently housed in a temporary building. Construction is underway, and parking is limited. Hike around Jenny Lake and up to Hidden Falls. No through trail from Hidden Falls to Inspiration Point this summer. Enjoy the shuttle boat or scenic cruise (fee charged). Menors Ferry & Chapel of the Transfiguration Turn east 1/2 mile north of Moose. Stroll through Menors Ferry Historic District to explore homestead and pioneer life in Jackson Hole. Visit Bill Menor’s cabin and view a replica of the ferry that crossed the Snake River. Visit the Chapel of the Transfiguration where the altar window frames the tallest Teton peaks. Extra Time? Try one of these activities. Ranger-Led Activities Join a park ranger to learn more about the natural and cultural history of Grand Teton National Park. Programs include tours, guided hikes, campfire programs and more. Program schedule available in the Grand Teton Guide. Take a Hike There are over 250 miles of hiking trails in the park ranging from level, easy trails on the valley floor to steep, strenuous trails into the mountains. Ask at a visitor center for recommended hikes and trail guides.
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Elk Reduction in Progress Elk living in Grand Teton National Park are part of the Jackson herd, one of the largest elk herds in North America. The herd occupies parts of Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks, and the Teton and Gros Ventre wilderness areas. National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway This migratory herd has a long management history. Supplemental feeding began in the early 1900s—allowing for a large elk population with low natural mortality. Today, feeding occurs on the National Elk Refuge and three state-operated feedgrounds increasing the need for active management across the herd’s range. ... Elk Reduction Areas - Grand Teton National Park Yellowstone National Park John D. Rocke feller, J r Memorial Park way µ £ ¤ 89 191 287 1:170,000 0 1 2 4 Miles Jackson Lake Grand Teton National Park Cari bou-Ta rg hee Nat i onal Forest Tw o Oc ean La k e Em ma Lake Matilda Moran Leigh Lake ar k nP Teto ¤ £ 26 287 Elk Ranch Reservoir d Ro a AREA 79 Jenny Lake Sn ak e Ri ve r ~ Brid ger -Tet on Nat i onal Forest e lo An t pe s Fla t I Due to the herd’s unusual circumstances, Congress authorized an elk reduction program as part of the 1950 legislation establishing Grand Teton National Park. Rd The program occurs most years during the fall in hunt areas east of the Snake River (see map). The National Park Service in partnership with the State of Wyoming oversees and regulates the reduction program. Moose Craig Thomas Discovery and Vi sitor Center AREA 75 Every year the park and Wyoming Game and Fish Department collect biological data that LEGEND guide decisions surrounding the reduction. £ ¤ The program goal is to help support elk management objectives while minimizing its effect on other park resources and the visiting public. Moose Wilson Road os Gr GRTE GIS 10/14/2015 Saved: 10/14/2015 10:18:48 AM X:\ProjectData\Management\ElkReductionProgram\2015\ERP_2015_11x17p.mxd 89 191 26 Ve nt re a Ro d Nati on al Elk Refu ge •• • Elk Reduction Area 79 Elk Reduction Area 75 Closed to Public Entry The program runs mid-October through mid-December. The park’s legislation allows elk hunting only. No other hunting is permitted. Hunt areas remain open to visitors. Please wear orange or other bright colors if you plan to venture off the road in hunt areas. For more information, please call 307-739-3399.
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Fishing 2020 Cutthroat Trout by Joe Tomelleri Licenses A Wyoming fshing license is required. Licenses require a Conservation Stamp ($12.50) except the one- or fve-day licenses. Resident Annual* $27.00 One-Day $6.00 Youth (14-17, annual*) $3.00 Under 14 (creel limit applies) none Non-resident Annual* $102.00 One-Day $14.00 Five-Day $56.00 Youth (14-17, annual*) $15.00 *Annual license is valid for 12 consecutive months. Non-residents under 14, accompanied by an adult possessing a valid Wyoming fshing license, may fsh free; or they may purchase any non-resident license. Fish caught by persons under 14 are included in the licensed person’s creel limit. Seasonal Restrictions and Closures Lakes Lakes within Grand Teton National Park are open to fshing year-round with the following exception: October 1–31. Jackson Lake is closed to fshing. Rivers and Streams Please refer to the following list for seasonal closures and restrictions. • November 1–March 31. All cutthroat trout caught in open, moving water must be released back to the water immediately. Legal Tackle Legal Fishing Tackle An angler may use two rods or poles if actively monitoring both. Each line may have no more than three single or treble hooks, fies, or lures attached. Flies, Lures, and Bait • Rivers and Streams Only artifcial fies and lures may be used in the Snake River from the gauging station (1,000 feet below Jackson Lake Dam) to the Wyoming Highway 22 Bridge (Wilson Bridge) and all streams; excluding the Bufalo Fork, Gros Ventre River, Pacifc Creek, Purchase fshing licenses at Wyoming Game and Fish ofces, online (wgfd.wyo.gov), or license vendors throughout the state. Within the park, purchase licenses at: Snake River Anglers at Dornans, Signal Mountain Lodge front desk, Colter Bay Village Store, and the Headwaters Lodge at Flagg Ranch. Prohibited Actions • Chumming or placing food or other substances in water to feed or attract fsh. • Digging for or collecting any bait. • Snagging, archery, and spear-gun fshing. • Fishing from Jackson Lake Dam, boat docks, any bridge used by vehicles, or within the limits of designated mooring areas and swimming beaches. • Improper disposal of fsh parts and feeding fsh parts to wildlife such as bears, birds, or foxes. • December 15–March 31. Access to the Snake River is closed from the Bufalo Fork confuence at Moran to Menors Ferry at Moose. Access to the Bufalo Fork is closed from the east park boundary to the Snake River confuence at Moran. • December 1–July 31. All streams and Blacktail Spring Ponds within Grand Teton National Park are closed; excluding Polecat Creek, Bufalo Fork River, Pacifc Creek, Gros Ventre River, and Snake River in Teton County. Polecat Creek, and the Snake River upstream of Jackson Lake. • Lakes On lakes not otherwise restricted to fshing, or designated as artifcial fies and lures only; the following dead, non-game fsh may be used or possessed as bait: redside shiner, speckled dace, longnose dace, Paiute sculpin, mottled sculpin, Utah chub, Utah sucker, and commercially preserved dead baitfsh. Creel and Size Limits Lakes in Grand Teton National Park • Six (6) trout* per day or in possession, no more than three (3) shall be cutthroat trout; and no more than one (1) cutthroat trout shall exceed twelve (12) inches. Streams in Grand Teton National Park • Three (3) trout*, no more than one (1) shall exceed sixteen (16) inches; and no more than one (1) cutthroat trout shall exceed twelve (12) inches. * Trout – excludes brook and lake trout. In addition to the previous creel limits, anglers may also have in possession: • Brook Trout: Sixteen (16) • Lake Trout: Six (6), no more than one (1) shall exceed twenty-four (24) inches. • Whitefsh: Twenty-fve (25) Any fsh an angler chooses to release must be carefully and immediately returned to the water from which it was taken. Aquatic Invasive Species • Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are an increasing concern. Many bodies of water are already contaminated. Clean, drain, and dry boats, boots, and waders before entering a new body of water. • Park inspection stations at Moose and Moran. • Never empty containers of bait, fsh, plants or animals into park waters. • Any watercraft transported into Wyoming March 1–November 30 requires boat inspection prior to launch, and the purchase of an AIS decal. Infatable craft less than 10 feet long are exempt. • Purchase decals at many fshing gear stores, or online: wgfd.wyo.gov. • AIS Fees Non-motorized Motorized Resident $5 $10 Non-resident $15 $30 ~ ~ -••, 11111 Zones and Seasons ,......,..... Please Note: This map is designed to aid anglers in identifying fshing areas. The boundaries are shown on a small scale and cannot be considered legally proper or exact. For detailed information please refer to: Wyoming Game & Fish: Wyoming Fishing Regulations 2020.
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Floating the Snake River The River The headwaters of the wild and scenic Snake River are on the boundary between Yellowstone National Park and the Teton Wilderness. Floating the river is complex. A tangle of channels and constantly shifting logjams require boaters to anticipate their routes well in advance. Accidents are common. Please use caution and check conditions before each trip. Flow rates vary greatly throughout the year. They are posted at river landings and permit ofces weekly or when there is a signifcant change. Spring fows are very cold, fast and muddy making the river more difcult. As snowmelt diminishes, volume decreases and water clears. In spite of reduced fow, the current remains deceptively powerful. Strong, upstream afternoon winds may slow your pace. Safety and Etiquette • Prepare boats away from launch ramps to reduce congestion at landings. • Launch when other boats are out of sight, and maintain this interval throughout your trip. • Excessive noise disrupts the river experience for other boaters and disturbs wildlife. Keep silent during wildlife encounters. • Steer clear of other boaters and anglers, including fshing lines. • Rangers regularly patrol the river in summer. Contact river patrol rangers for assistance while foating. • Information and permits are available at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center and the Colter Bay Visitor Center. • Carry the following equipment: an extra paddle or oar, a waterproof container with extra clothes, frst aid kit and waste receptacle. Infatable boats should have an air pump, bailing bucket, and patch kit. • Attach all gear securely. • Do not drink river water unless boiled or purifed. • Swimming is not recommended in the river. • For information on Snake River fows, call 1-800-658-5771 or check: waterdata.usgs.gov/wy/nwis/current?type=fow. Regulations • Park Permit fee: $12 season, non-motorized. • Vessels must carry USCG approved personal fotation devices (PFDs) of the appropriate size for each person on board. Passengers under 13 years of age must wear a PFD. • A non-motorized park boat permit is required for each watercraft. Permits available at: Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center or the Colter Bay Visitor Center. Display the permit on the port side (left) in the stern (back). • Boating under the infuence of alcohol or drugs is prohibited. • Inner tubes, air mattresses, foat tubes, and similar fotation devices are prohibited. • Motors are prohibited on the Snake River. • Motors may be used on Jackson Lake for the Flagg Ranch to Lizard Creek section with a motorized boat permit. • All motorized watercraft shall have an efcient sound producing device on board. • No camping or fres on the river. • Floating is prohibited on all rivers in the park and parkway except the Snake River. The Snake River is closed to foating and public entry each year, December 15 to April 1 from the Bufalo Fork confuence south to Menors Ferry. • Floating is prohibited within 1,000 feet of the Jackson Lake Dam. • A concession permit is required for all commercial activity in the park. • Report any accident with a collision or injury to a ranger within 24 hours. • Pack out all trash. Aquatic Invasive Species • Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are an increasing concern. Many bodies of water are already contaminated. Clean, drain, and dry boats, boots, and waders before entering a new body of water. • Park inspection stations at Moose and Moran. • Never empty containers of bait, fsh, plants or animals into park waters. • Any watercraft transported into Wyoming March 1–November 30 requires boat inspection prior to launch, and the purchase of an AIS decal. Infatable craft less than 10 feet long are exempt. • Purchase decals at many fshing gear stores, or online: wgfd.wyo.gov. • AIS Fees Non-motorized Motorized Resident $5 $10 Non-resident $15 $30 *Pacifc Creek Landing – 2020 YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Due to construction, access will be limited. The launch will open no earlier than June 7 and will close after August 31. Southgate Launch Flagg Information Station Suggested Float Trips JOHN D Beginner Level Flagg Ranch Landing ROCKEFELLER JR PARKWAY iver MEMORIAL --1 North Sna ke R • Jackson Lake Dam to *Pacifc Creek ,. This stretch features scenic views, calmer ) water and few obstructions. At Pacifc Creek landing the water is swift, boaters should scout this landing prior to launching. (f) Intermediate Level Lizard Creek Campground I_ - GRAND 0 1 Mile I River Access N LAKE TETON 3 10 5 10 10 14 ■ 191 191 287 287 Colter Bay Visitor Center KSO PARK • 89 Advanced Level Mileages 5 Information NATIONAL 5 --, Cattleman's Bridge site Jackson Lake Dam Buffalo Fork Ranger Station iv Pacifc Creek Landing R e Jenny Lake Visitor Center er - Deadmans Bar Jenny Lake ---' I ak
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Day Hike and Lakeshore Maps ad Ro ass Gr y 1 Flagg Ranch Lake John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway BEAR AWARE FOOD STORAGE REQUIRED N 89 GRAND 2 KSO TETON 191 287 4 JAC rm ita N AT I O N A L E RANG Signal Mountain Lodge 16 NTBRUS ON N Y String A C Lake H TETON ALASKA BASIN ET NY G R A NI TE C A N South Jenny Lake • Carry bear spray and know how to use it. Guard against accidental discharge. • Proper food storage is required. Ask a ranger for more information. • Carry drinking water. • Be prepared for rapid weather changes; bring rain gear and extra clothing. Avoid wearing cotton. 10 • High elevation may cause breathing diffculties; pace yourself. 11 • Snow melts gradually, leaving valley trails by mid-June, mountain trails and passes by late July. Be careful crossing snowfelds and streams. 12 13 YO N Wil eo o M a Ro s on • Tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return. LSR Preserve • Solo hiking, off-trail hiking, and trail running are not recommended. 26 89 North 191 15 Aerial 14 Tram • The use of personal audio devices is strongly discouraged. Moose Phelps Lake Marion Lake A SN KE CANYON ON 287 • BE BEAR AWARE! Avoid surprising bears by making noise—call out and clap your hands at regular intervals. Bear bells are not suffcient. 17 s H CA ER d DEAT 26 9 RN Bradley Lake Taggart Static Peak Lake Divide (USFS) Signal Mountain For Your Safety 7 8 Amphitheater Lake GA EMMA MATILDA LAKE 6 JENNY LAKE CASCADE CANYON Teton Canyon 5 RIV PA I 3 LEIGH LAKE Holly Lake Lake Solitude Jackson Lake Lodge He PA R K Paintbrush Divide TWO OCEAN LAKE Colter Bay Pt. NYO ge E CA N LAKE W BB Teton Village # Trailhead (details on reverse side) Trail Unpaved road • Check with a ranger for up-to-date information on trail conditions, and closures. 0 1 Kilometer 0 1 Mile 5 5 Backcountry Regulations Parking Tips • Respect wildlife. Do not approach or feed animals. Observe them from a safe distance— 100 yards from bears and wolves, and 25 yards from all other wildlife! If an animal reacts to your presence you are too close. • During July and August most trailhead parking areas fll early in the day. Be fexible; plan for alternate hikes. • All overnight camping in the backcountry requires a permit. • Parking on natural vegetation may result in permanent damage or may start a fre. Obey posted parking regulations. • Carry out all your garbage. • Hike on established trails to prevent erosion. • Stock has the right-of-way. Step off the trail on the uphill side and wait quietly while stock passes. • Pets, bicycles and vehicles are not allowed on trails or in the backcountry. • Backcountry sanitation: To prevent waterway contamination, bury human waste in a hole 6–8 inches deep at least 200 feet from water. Pack out used toilet paper, tampons, sanitary napkins and diapers in sealed plastic bags. Do not bury or burn any materials. Special rules apply in Garnet Canyon. • Start your hike early to minimize parking problems. • The Moose-Wilson Road is closed to vehicles over 23.3 feet long including all RVs and trailers. These regulations limit access to the Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve, Death Canyon and Granite Canyon trailheads. • Parking at the Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve is limited to only 50 vehicles. No parking is allowed along the road. Northern Lakeshore Trails 1 Flagg Ranch 2 Colter Bay / Hermitage Point N Colter Bay Visitor Center Hotsprings l Soaking in pools such as Huckleberry Hotsprings where thermal waters originate in prohibited to protect resources. Soaking in adjacent run-off streams is allowed, provided they do not contain an originating water sources. ai Lak esh o anyon Flagg C 0.1 m i T & o 1.2 mi 0.3 ake Roa d mi l ai Tr ssy L 0.5 mi -x -x -x -x -x -x -x -x -x -x -x -x Gra d Pon n e o k r He an La w S 0.2 mi 3 Jackson Lake Lodge - ine erl-x -x x Pox w -x - Flagg Ranch 1 2 JACKSON LAKE e rs -x -x -x Po le c a t C 1 k ree 0.4 mi Hermitage Point Ho -x -x i .3 m North Tr re 89 N 191 287 To Emma Matilda & Two Ocean Lakes e Lodg Headwaters Lodge, RV & Campground 3 e To Christian Pond mi Lodg 89 1.3 Snak e R iver Jackson Lake Lodge 191 287 2–5 Hermitage Point, Two Ocean & Emma Matilda Lakes 3.4 North 1.1 0.7 mi i 0.8 mi MAT ILDA LAKE 3.3 mi Christian Pond 0.5 mi Oxbow Bend Turnout kR 1.3 0.3 ee t E A MM 0.6 mi see above i d Jackson Lake Lodge 3 Jackson Lake Junction Cr i ci fi c JACKSON LAKE Pa Sn ke Signal Mountain 5 River n Su Signal Mountain Lodge m Road m it ta i oh o Pt. a Don ge ita rm He m 2.6 m mi mi 3 E Two Ocean Lake 4 oa 0 . 8 mi 0 .8 mi 2 Lunch Tree Hill 0.6 2. AK mi mi i in 3.0 Grand View Point 7586 ft mi mi 1.4
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Mountaineering General Information The Teton Range offers some of the most accessible and diverse climbing in the country. The wide array of rock, snow and ice, and mixed routes range from easy outings to very difficult undertakings. There are many inherent risks and hazards associated with all forms of climbing and mountain travel. Risks include: lightning, rockfall, avalanches, crevasses, and extreme weather Mountain Weather Weather conditions are usually best from mid-July through August, although afternoon thundershowers are common. In the high country, late August usually sees at least one period of inclement weather including snowfall. After mid-August, major storms can occur anytime producing snow and ice on most routes. Winter weather is usually severe with heavy snowfall, high winds, and extremely cold conditions (even during the summer months). A fall on steep snow and failing to self-arrest with an ice axe is the number one cause of accidents and deaths. Please be responsible for your actions. Competent technique, experience, safety equipment, physical fitness and good judgment are essential to preventing or minimizing the chances of an accident. temperatures. During winter and early spring, avalanche danger is frequently high. Winter mountaineering trips should be undertaken only by well-equipped, self-sufficient parties with considerable experience. Spring and early summer are characterized by rain, some snow and sub-freezing temperatures. During these months, rockfall and wet-snow avalanche activity are a common. Backcountry Permits Accommodations Equipment Registration is not required for climbing, mountaineering or day hiking. A backcountry permit is required for all overnight use (fee). During summer, all permits involving climbing are issued by the Jenny Lake Ranger Station. The American Alpine Club Climbers' Ranch, a park concession, provides low-cost accommodations for climbers. For information: americanalpineclub. org/grand-teton-climbers-ranch. Park campgrounds may be used as base camps, although each campground has a limit-of­ stay. All overnight stays in the backcountry require a permit. Conventional mountaineering equipment is adequate for climbing in the Teton Range in summer. An ice axe and expertise in its use is the single most important technique needed for early season climbs. Climbing helmets are strongly recommended for all climbs. Climbing equipment and backpacking supplies may be purchased in the area, and a limited selection of equipment may be rented. The park does not check to see that you return safely. Provide someone with your itinerary, and have them notify authorities if you are overdue. Rescue Guidelines Self-Rescue In the event of an accident or other issue, be self reliant—focus on other party members and your own efforts! Enlist the aid of other climbers in the area. Do not depend on the park rescue team. In the event of a known injury, the rescue team will make efforts to help you. Keep in mind, however, that the decision if, when or how to initiate a search or rescue is left to the discretion of Grand Teton National Park. Many factors, such as weather, daylight, and hazards to the rescue team may delay or postpone any park rescue effort. Grand Teton National Park Rescue Team The park’s search and rescue team is fully staffed only during the summer months. If self-rescue is impossible, notify the park as quickly as possible. What to Do When an Accident Occurs Do not leave an accident victim alone unless absolutely necessary. If it is necessary to leave an injured person, provide first aid, secure the person to prevent further injury, leave food, water and warm clothes before going for help. Be able to relay the following information: name, age, weight of victim(s), exact location of the accident, nature of the injuries, time of the accident, equipment at the scene, number of persons remaining at the scene and plan of action. Search & Rescue Funding All climbers should be aware that search and rescue operations are funded from the park budget. Large expenditures may result in reduction of other services. Please send tax deductible donations to help support the rescue team: Mountain Rescue Fund, Grand Teton National Park, P.O. Box 170, Moose, WY 83012. References Several guidebooks are currently available for the Teton Range include Best Climbs: Grand Teton National Park by Richard Rossiter and A Climber's Guide to the Teton Range by Leigh N. Ortenburger and Reynold G. Jackson. Topographic trail maps are also available. These publications may be purchased at park visitor center bookstores or by mail from the Grand Teton Association, Grand Teton National Park, P.O. Box 170, Moose, WY 83012, or on the web: www. grandtetonpark.org . Guide Services Two mountaineering guide services operate in Grand Teton National P
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Pets Grand Teton National Park is a wild and special place—legally mandated to protect park resources. Pets may disturb wildlife or escape and quickly become prey. Follow all pet regulations. See the map for suggested areas for exercising your pet in or near the park. Always leash your pet and dispose of pet feces properly. Regulations • • • • • • • • • • • You are responsible for clean-up and disposal of pet feces. Mutt Mitt stations may be provided, but plan to bring your own bags for pet waste disposal. Pets must be kept under physical control at all times—caged, crated or restrained on a leash not exceeding six feet in length. Pets are prohibited in the backcountry and on park trails. Pets are prohibited from public buildings and swimming beaches. Pets must stay within 30 feet of any roadway. Pets are prohibited from riding in boats on park waters, except for Jackson Lake. Pets must not be left unattended and/or tied to an object. Pets are prohibited from making unreasonable noise or frightening wildlife. Pets running-at-large may be impounded and their owners charged for their care and feeding. Dog sledding is prohibited. Pets are not allowed on the multi-use pathway. Permitted Pets may accompany visitors in developed campgrounds, turnouts and picnic areas. Pets may be walked along any roads that cars are permitted on. Yield to trafc. Pets are allowed in the surrounding BridgerTeton National Forest trails and backcountry unless otherwise posted. See map for other areas where pets may be walked on leash. Caution Leaving your pet inside a vehicle may be dangerous. Temperatures during the summer may reach 90 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Inside a car temperatures rise quickly, even on cool days. Leaving your pet in a vehicle for extended amounts of time may lead to death and heat exhaustion. If you do leave your pet in the car, crack the windows as much as possible (without allowing your pet to escape) and provide plenty of drinking water. Do not leave pets in the car when temperatures are above 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Kennels Consider kenneling your pet while spending time in the park. Reservations are strongly advised and may be required. Commercial kennels are available in surrounding communities. Please check local listings. Winter/Spring During the winter the Teton Park Road from Taggart Lake Trailhead to Signal Mountain Lodge and the Moose-Wilson Road from Death Canyon Road junction to Granite Canyon Trailhead are closed to motorized trafc from November 1 through April 30. Pet-owners may exercise their pets on the closed roads when the roads are open for winter or spring recreation. Follow all posted rules. Pets must be leashed. Service Dogs Walk your pet in the designated pet walking lane. Do not allow your pet to destroy the groomed cross-country ski track when in place. Use Mutt Mitts for picking up pet feces when provided. Dispose of pet waste in garbage cans. Pets may not be farther than 30 feet from the roadway. Service Dogs are allowed in the park subject to regulations of the Americans with Disabilities Act. • • • • • Service dogs are allowed in park buildings and on trails to assist someone with a disability. Service animals other than dogs are not allowed. Dogs being trained as service dogs do not qualify as service animals under ADA and are subject to the same regulations as all pets. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service FIND YOUR PARK™ • animals under ADA and are subject to the same regulations as all pets. Service dogs must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animals work or the individual’s disability prevents using these. In that case the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice signal or other efective controls. No permit is required. REV 03/15 Regulations & Suggested Pet Areas YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK To Ashton Gr sy as PET REGULATIONS Flagg Ranch 36 CFR §2.15 Pet owners are required to clean up their pet’s excrement and properly dispose of it in a trash receptacle. Huckleberry Mountain 9615ft 2930m Unattended pets are not permitted to be tied up in campgrounds, picnic areas or trailheads. They may be left within vehicles with appropriate ventilation, water and/ or food. GRAND TETON N AT I O N A L PA R K RANGE 5 LEGEND Distances between markers LAKE 89 Multi-use Pathway SON 191 287 TWO OCEAN LAKE Colter Bay Visitor Center JACK TETON d an Roa EMMA MATILDA LAKE 5 mi ek Cre ific c a P Moran Junction Signal Mountain 9 mi String Lake k Par n o Tet ad Sn 18 mi Shadow Mountain Road 8 mi Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center lope Ante Flats on ils -W e tr M d oa rR 191 n Ve se os ve Ri Kelly oo BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST Owners may walk pets on the roa
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Snowmobiling 2019-20 General Snowmobile Information • Grand Teton National Park & John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway www.nps.gov/grte/planyourvisit/winter.htm • Best Available Technology (BAT) snowmobiles are required for operation in Grand Teton National Park (GRTE). A list of current BAT snowmobiles authorized for use in the park is found on the back of this brochure. BAT certifcation expires for snowmobiles older than 10 years or that have traveled more than 6,000 miles, regardless of age. • Snowmobile use in GRTE is limited to the frozen surface of Jackson Lake for ice fshing access only. Access to the frozen surface of the lake is limited to the Colter Bay Swim Beach as posted there. • Snowmobile use in John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway (JODR), except to access Yellowstone National Park (YELL) through its South Entrance (see below), is limited to Grassy Lake Road when open. Of-road travel anywhere in JODR is prohibited. BAT snowmobiles are not required. Entrance Fees Grand Teton National Park $15 per vehicle for a one-day pass (only for ice fshing on Jackson Lake) $35 per vehicle for a seven-day pass Yellowstone National Park For information on access to Yellowstone National Park, please visit the park website for current information: • Commercial Snowmobile/Snowcoach tours: www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/snowmobiles-snowcoaches.htm • Non-commercial snowmobile access: www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/ncgsap.htm Regulations and Safety • A person operating a snowmobile must possess a valid motor vehicle operator’s license. Temporary or learner’s permits are not acceptable. • Snowmobiles must be properly registered and display a valid registration from the United States or Canada. • All snowmobiles must have a working white headlight and a red taillight. Lights should be on at all times for safety. • Travel on Jackson Lake is at your own risk. Be aware of changing ice conditions. • Be alert for oncoming snowmobiles on Grassy Lake Road. Of-road travel is prohibited. • All snowmobile use is subject to posted speed limits and regulations pertaining to operation under the infuence of alcohol or drugs. Contact Information • EMERGENCY 911 • WY Snowmobiling conditions 1-800-225-5996 • Grand Teton National Park Info. 307-739-3399 grte_info@nps.gov • Yellowstone National Park Info. 307-344-7381 yell_visitor_services@nps.gov • Grand Teton Road conditions 307-739-3682 Rev. 11/2019 Grand Teton National Park Approved BAT Snowmobiles 2019–2020 (if under 6,000 miles) * Model Years 2015-2020 also approved for Yellowstone Ski Doo/Bombardier Model Years Yamaha Model Years Expedition Sport 600 ACE 2011–2013 / 2015–2019 Yamaha RS10Y 2016–2018 Expedition Sport 900 ACE 2014–2018 RS Venture (with YELL BAT Kit) 2011–2014 Expedition LE 900 ACE 2020 Expedition SE 900 ACE 2020 Arctic Cat Model Years Grand Touring Sport 600 ACE 2011–2013 / 2015–2020 Bearcat Z1 XT (with throttle block) 2011–2014 F 1100 (with throttle block) 2012–2013 M 1100 (with throttle block) 2012–2013 TZ1 (with throttle block) 2011–2014 TZ1 LXR (with throttle block) 2011–2014 XF 1100 (with throttle block) 2012–2013 Z1 LXR (with throttle block) 2011 ZR 5000 LXR (with throttle block) 2014 Grand Touring Limited 900 ACE 2019–2020 Grand Touring Sport 900 ACE 2020 Grand Touring LE 900 ACE 2014–2018 Grand Touring SE 900 ACE 2017–2018 Grand Touring LE 1200 2011–2013 Grand Touring SE 1200 2011–2013 GSX LE 900 ACE 2014–2015 GSX LE 1200 2013 GSX SE 1200 2011 MXZ Sport 600 ACE 2011–2013 / 2015–2018 MXZ TNT 600 ACE 2011–2013 MXZ TNT 900 ACE 2014–2018 MXZ Blizzard 900 ACE 2016–2018 Renegade Sport 600 ACE 2011–2013 / 2015–2019 Renegade Adrenaline 900 ACE 2014–2018 Renegade Enduro 900 ACE 2016–2018 Skandic WT 600 ACE 2011–2013 Skandic SWT 600 ACE 2013 Tundra LT 600 ACE 2011–2013 / 2015–2020 Tundra Sport 600 ACE 2012–2013 / 2015–2020 Per 36 CFR 7.22(g), this list is specifc to a direct route upon the frozen surface of Jackson Lake for ice fshing while in possession of a WY fshing license and proper fshing gear, subject to additional regulations in 36 CFR 2.18. Snowmobile models on this list are not approved if manufactured prior to 2011 model year or exceed 6,000 miles.
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Saddle and Pack Stock Horses and other stock have been historically used in the park and parkway. “Stock” is defned as horses, burros, mules, and llamas. Goats are not permitted due to the sensitivity of the local bighorn sheep population. Stock users share trails with hikers— please be considerate of other trail users. Many trails are rocky and traverse steep terrain. High country trails may remain blocked by snow and impassable to stock until late July. Please refrain from accessing trails that are overly muddy. Check with the park permits ofce 307-739-3309 prior to setting out. Many horse travelers camp in the adjoining national forest land and take day rides in the park. The primary trailheads for day use are: • Cathedral Group Turnout • Poker Flats Trailhead • Taggart Lake Trailhead Camping Backcountry Camping with Stock Backcountry camping with stock is allowed only at the fve designated stock sites in the park. Fires are not allowed and a backcountry camping permit is required. The sites may be reserved in advance from early-January to mid-May through www.recreation.gov; the reservation fee is $45. The fee for walk-in permits, available up to one day in advance, is $35. All backcountry stock camps are signed and hitch rails are provided. Backcountry stock camp locations: • North Fork of Granite Canyon • Death Canyon • South Fork of Cascade Canyon • Paintbrush Canyon below Holly Lake • Berry Creek near Hechtman Creek Regulations General Regulations • No party may have more than 12 head of stock for day use or 12 people or 10 head of stock for overnight trips. • Grazing is prohibited. Processed feed must be packed in and used for all overnight trips; no hay may be packed in. Where allowed, all hay used in the park must be certifed as weed free in compliance with Teton County standards. • The construction of corrals, picketing, hobbling or tying stock to natural features such as trees is prohibited. If hitch rails are not available, tie a rope between two trees away from water sources. • Llama trekkers should yield the right of way to other stock. Give a verbal warning regarding the presence of llamas to those on horseback as soon as the riders are in hearing range. Llama trekkers should leave the trail and remain stationary until horses have passed. • For safety reasons, only well-broken, properly shod (except llamas), gentle stock in good condition may be used. • Keep stock animals at a slow walk when passing near people on foot or bicycle. • Stock animals have the right-of-way. Hikers should step of the trail and remain quiet while stock animals pass. Closed Trails • All trails within the Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve; except along the northeast and north portions of the lake. (Please see inset map on back.) • The Multi-use Pathway except for bridges over the Snake River, Cottonwood Creek, and Ditch Creek. • Rendezvous Mountain trail from the park boundary to the Middle Fork cutof of Granite Canyon trail. • Surprise and Amphitheater Lakes and Garnet Canyon from the Valley Trail. • Hidden Falls foot trail from the Jenny Lake west shore boat dock to the junction with the horse trail west of Inspiration Point. (Please see inset map on back.) • The foot trail on the east shore of Jenny Lake between the outlet of Jenny Lake and the junction of the Stock Campsites Accessible by Vehicle There are eight camping areas with a total of 14 sites that allow stock in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway along the unpaved road between Flagg Ranch and Grassy Lake. The road is closed until June 1 for grizzly bear migration. Park campgrounds prohibit stock. Camping with stock animals is allowed in adjacent national forest areas without a permit. Further information may be obtained from the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Box 1888, Jackson, Wyoming 83001, 307739-5500 or the Targhee National Forest, Driggs, Idaho 83422, 208-354-2312. designated horse trail north of Jenny Lake Overlook. • Holly Lake trail from the Holly Lake hitch rail past Holly Lake to the Paintbrush Canyon trail. • The String Lake trail and east lakeshore from the String Lake trailhead to the Jenny Lake Lodge trail except adjacent to the String Lake footbridge. • Please see Superintendent's Compendium for complete language. www.nps.gov/grte/learn/management/ upload/2019-Compendium-FINAL-access.pdf Areas Open to Stock Use All travel with stock must be on designated trails with the following exceptions: • Travel is allowed south of the RKO Road, north of the Chapel of the Transfguration Road, east of the Teton Park Road and west of the Snake River. • Travel is allowed east of the Snake River to the east park boundary, north of the south park boundary/Gros Ventre River and south of the Bufalo Fork. • Travel is allowed between Moose Basin Divide and Forellen Divide; and between Horsethief Pass and the Moose Ba
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Bird Finding Guide The mountains, rivers and lakes of Grand Teton National Park provide a picturesque backdrop for bird watching. Over 330 species of birds live in the various park communities including alpine, forests, meadows, sagebrush flats and riparian. Use this guide to learn about the communities found here, places to look for birds and some of the inhabitants. Pick up a park map and bird checklist at a visitor center to assist your search. Please report any sightings of birds listed as rare or accidental on the checklist. With a keen eye, you can discover some of the birds that grace this landscape. Communities Birds inhabit a variety of communities throughout the park and parkway. They are searching for food, water, shelter and nesting sites. Some birds frequent only one community while others occupy a variety. Alpine Elevation, harsh winters and brief summers limit vegetation to low-growing forms. Birds that nest above treeline migrate south or to lower elevations for winter. Watch for golden eagles, ravens, Clark’s nutcrackers, rosy finches, white-crowned sparrows and water pipits. Lodgepole Pine Forests Dense lodgepole pine forests cover glacial moraines on the valley floor and the lower mountain slopes. Look for olive-sided flycatchers, yellow-rumped warblers, ruby-crowned kinglets, mountain chickadees, white-crowned and chipping sparrows and dark-eyed juncos. Aspen Forests Aspens often occur in pure stands on hillsides. Trees with rotting trunks attract woodpeckers. Bird Notes Just a note about a few interesting species adapted to thrive here. • Greater Sage Grouse: In early spring, sage grouse gather for courtship in areas called “leks.” Males display for females at dawn. This species is in decline due to habitat loss. • Trumpeter Swans: The largest waterfowl in North America is making a comeback after near extinction in the early 1900s. Look for these birds in ponds and rivers. • Barrow’s Goldeneye: A cavity-nesting duck that lives here year-round in rivers and lakes. • Great Gray Owl: The tallest owl in North America with the largest wingspan. Males hunt during daylight making them visible in the lodgepole forest. • Bald Eagle and Osprey: Fish loving raptors thrive along the Snake and Gros Ventre rivers and the valley lakes. Later, abandoned woodpecker cavities provide nesting opportunities for saw-whet owls, house wrens, mountain and black-capped chickadees, tree swallows and violet-green swallows. Sagebrush Flats Sagebrush thrives in rocky, well-drained soils in a semi-arid environment covering much of the valley floor. Despite these harsh conditions many species flourish. Look for sage grouse, vesper sparrows, western meadowlark, mountain bluebird, Brewer’s sparrows and sage thrashers. Aquatic and Riparian Numerous rivers, creeks, lakes and ponds provide habitats where Canada geese and other waterfowl nest, while osprey and bald eagles hunt for fish. Common snipe, white-crowned and Lincoln sparrows, yellow and MacGillivray’s warblers, and common yellowthroats nest in adjacent wet meadows. American dippers search for insects in fast-moving mountain streams. Look for common mergansers, Barrow’s goldeneyes and mallards in small ponds and rivers and American white pelicans on Jackson Lake and the Snake River. • American Dipper: A small aquatic songbird that frequents cascading streams. Known for its up and down bobbing motion as it forages for aquatic insects. • Clark’s Nutcracker: Both males and females tend a high-elevation nest. They gather large conifer seeds from whitebark and limber pines and cache them for later. • Red Crossbills and Pine Grosbeaks: Large red finches that inhabit mature, open pine forests. The crossbill beak prys apart pinecone scales for the bird to gather the seeds. • Western Tanager: These colorful birds winter in southern Central America and nests in the lodgepole forests. The redder the male’s feathers, the more fit he is. • Calliope Hummingbird: The smallest bird north of Mexico feeds on nectar from tubular wildflowers. Birding Hot Spots Grand View Point Old growth Douglas firs support Williamson’s and red-naped sapsuckers. Songbirds include mountain chickadees, red-breasted nuthatches, western tanagers, Townsend’s solitaires, and darkeyed juncos. Dusky and ruffed grouse nest here. Christian Pond Look for waterfowl such as ruddy ducks, ringnecked ducks, American wigeon, American coots, and the occasional Trumpeter swan. Willow Flats Extensive willow thickets merge with wet grassy meadows crossed by small creeks and beaver dams. Cinnamon teal, green-winged teal and American wigeon frequent ponds and creeks. Sandhill cranes, northern harriers, American bitterns, common snipes and soras nest here. Calliope hummingbirds feed on scarlet gilia. Red­ naped sapsuckers and other woodpeckers abound. Frequent songbirds include will
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Elk Ecology & Management "Often from out of the forest, as I sit here writing, comes the long clear bugle note of a bull elk…These are the adventures of the wilderness, the scenes which make up Nature's great mosaic. Why do we so delight in the wild creatures of the forest, some of us so passionately that it colors our whole life." Olaus Murie, Wapiti Wilderness. Jackson Elk Herd Tens of thousands of elk live in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a 20 million acre area including Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks, the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway, seven national forests and two national wildlife refuges. We call elk in these areas the Jackson elk herd. Management of the herd is challenging and involves a reduction program in the form of an annual harvest. Physical Characteristics Elk are ungulates (hooved-animals) belonging to the deer family. Elk have a dark head, neck and legs, with a lighter brown body and a creamcolored rump. Wapiti, the Shawnee name for elk, means white rump. Females are darker than males. tissue composed of blood vessels that nourish developing antlers. Antlers are cartilage-like during formation, but later become bone. When fully developed, bulls rub off the velvet by scraping their antlers against saplings. Mature males have branched antlers, whereas yearling males have “spikes.” Antler size indicates dominance and nutritional state. Females do not have antlers. Older males shed their antlers in March and April, while younger bulls shed their antlers later. New antler growth begins within a week and continues until late August. At their peak rate of growth, “velvet” covered antlers may grow almost one inch per day. Velvet is fuzzy •Adult males weigh about 700 pounds; adult females weigh about 500 pounds. •The breeding period, called the rut, occurs from early September to mid-October. •The gestation period is 8-1/2 months; one calf is born in late May and June. Newborns weigh 30 pounds at birth and 250 pounds at the end of their first summer. •The average life span is 13 to 18 years. During the severe winter 1908-1909, thousands of elk died due to heavy snows and lack of access to winter range. Elk raided rancher's hay stored for livestock causing conflicts. In 1912, the National Elk Refuge established secure winter range. Today the refuge covers 24,700 acres of native grasses. In the summer, elk from the refuge migrate up to 60 miles to Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks and the Bridger-Teton National Forest. National Elk Refuge When snow becomes crusty or deep, elk struggle to reach their food and the refuge provides a supplement of alfalfa pellets. Elk stay on the refuge for about six months with about two and a half months of supplemental feeding. Winter mortality on the refuge is 1 – 2 percent; but ranges up to 20 percent outside the refuge. Elk Annual Cycle During autumn, males establish harems of females to mate with and zealously guard. Bulls bugle, a high-pitched whistling sound, followed by grunts, as a display of dominance to attract females and assert their rank. Rival males respond by bugling back. Bulls may spar with challengers, after first aggressively posturing and thrashing the ground with their antlers. Females enter estrus (breeding receptivity) for a twelve-hour period. Estrus may recur up to four times at twenty-day intervals until successful. 85 to 90 percent of females become pregnant each year. The rut is an intense time for bulls. Dominant males expend a considerable amount of energy and rarely eat. The price for passing on their genes means bulls enter winter severely depleted. Reduced food supplies and snowfall in the high country prompt elk to leave their summer range. Beginning in October, elk migrate from summer grounds to winter grounds. Elk paw through snow to reach forage. Elk are susceptible to a number of diseases including brucellosis and chronic wasting disease. Brucellosis is a contagious bacterial disease that originated in livestock and often causes infected cows to abort their first calves. An average of 30 percent elk on feed-grounds have tested positive for exposure to brucellosis. Chronic wasting disease is a contagious fatal disease with no known vaccine that has spread within 130 miles of Yellowstone National Park. As snow melts in early spring, elk stream off the refuge. They follow new vegetation as they return to their traditional summer range in higher elevation meadows; 2,500 elk summer in Grand Teton National Park. Females give birth to calves on their summer range or while migrating. Cows, calves and yearling males remain in small groups throughout the summer, while older males, form bachelor herds. Summer is a brief time of plenty. Elk are primarily grazers—they eat lush grasses and wildflowers, although when food is scarce, they will browse on woody sh
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Journey Through the Past: A Geologic Tour The Big Picture When visitors catch their first glimpse of the Teton Range, the jagged skyline sparks wonder. What natural forces shaped this magnificent landscape? Some of these forces began and ended long ago, but some of these forces are still changing the landscape today. The rocks found in the core of the mountains are some of the oldest in North America; whereas, the forces that lifted the Teton Range and formed the Jackson Hole valley began very recently in geologic time. Our journey through the past explores these stories of the Teton Range. The Rocks Figure 1. Mount Moran is composed of metamorphic gneiss, igneous granite and diabase, and sedimentary sandstone. The summit is flanked by five glaciers. The geologic story of the Teton Range began more than 2.7 billion years ago. Sand, mud and volcanic sediment sank into an ancient sea. The collision of tectonic plates, moving sections of the Earth's crust, buried these sediments up to 20 miles deep. Heat and pressure changed these sediments into a metamorphic rock called gneiss. In this rock, light and dark minerals separated into layers as seen along the trail to Inspiration Point, or sometimes into “eyes” as seen in Death Canyon. Inland seas flooded the region about 510 million years ago, depositing sand, mud, and forming coral reefs during the next 400 million years. With burial, these sediments compressed into layered sedimentary rocks such as sandstone, shale, limestone and dolomite. These rocks flank the Teton Range to the south, west, and north and outcrop on Blacktail Butte. (Figure 2) Around 2.5 billion years ago, molten rock called magma squeezed into weak zones or cracks in the gneiss. Crystals grew as the magma slowly cooled to form an igneous rock called granite. These bodies of granite are inches to hundreds of feet thick slicing through the gneiss. Granite appears speckled in contrast to the layers seen in gneiss. Granite is harder than gneiss and forms the jagged summits of the Cathedral Group such as the Grand Teton. Roughly 775 million years ago, iron-rich magma similar to basalt squeezed into vertical cracks in the granite and gneiss and cooled to form dikes. These igneous dikes are made of a rock called diabase. The “Black Dike” on Mount Moran is roughly 150 feet wide, sticks out from the face of the mountain 200 feet and continues west for six or seven miles before being buried under younger sedimentary rocks. This dike sticks out from the face of Mount Moran because diabase is harder than gneiss. (Figure 1) Mountain Building Figure 3. Regional map tracing the path of the magma hotspot that lies under Yellowstone National Park today. The dike on the face of the Middle Teton, however, forms a slot because granite is harder than diabase. Starting 120 million years ago, a tectonic plate under the Pacific Ocean collided into the west coast of North America. This collision built mountains by crumpling the Earth’s surface from the west coast progressing eastward. Mountain building reached the Rocky Mountains and Gros Ventre Range around 70 million years ago by thrusting large blocks of bedrock skyward. (Figure 3) Formation 2.7 Figure 2. Stratigraphic column shows the age, relative thickness and hardness of rocks found in the core of the Teton Range. As the Rocky Mountain uplift ended, lava erupted from volcanoes across the region. Layers of lava and volcanic debris deposited to form the Absaroka Range. Lingering heat from this molten rock left the Earth’s crust hot and bulged up like a hot-air balloon. In places, the crust stretched past the breaking point. Huge blocks of the Earth's crust broke and slipped past each other along faults such as the Teton fault. Teton Fault Movement on the Teton fault accounts for the dramatic uplift of the Teton Range. Starting 10 million years ago, a series of massive earthquakes triggered by movement on the Teton fault tilted the mountain block skyward and dropped the valley block. Each of these earthquakes, up to magnitude 7.5, broke or offset the Earth’s surface by up to ten feet. Figure 4. Each major earthquake breaks the Earth's crust forming a vertical face of raw dirt and rock called a scarp. Today, the total offset on the Teton fault approaches 30,000 feet. The Flathead Sandstone caps Mount Moran 6,000 feet above the valley floor. This same sandstone layer lies buried more than 20,000 feet beneath the valley floor. The best view of the Teton fault is from the Cathedral Group Turnout along the Jenny Lake Scenic Loop. From this vantage point, the fault “scarp” or break in the Earth’s crust represents up to a dozen earthquakes since the end of the Pleistocene Ice Age. (Figure 4 ; Figure 5) Every day seismic instruments record earthquakes up to magnitude 5 in the Teton – Yellowstone region. Few if any of
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Disappearing Glaciers Middle Teton Glacier. NPS Photo. Glaciers A glacier is a river of ice flowing slowly downhill due to gravity. Ice slides over bedrock eroding the surface below, and deforming under its own weight. If the ice quits moving, the remaining snow and ice become a permanent snowfield or remnant glacier. An active glacier is a balance between winter snow accumulation and summer melt. If accumulation outpaces melt for a number of years, the glacier will advance. If the reverse is true, the glacier will retreat, meaning the toe will melt back faster than the glacier is flowing. Importance Modern Glaciers Crevasses on Middle Teton Glacier. NPS Photo. Timing Glaciers respond to climate trends providing a visual and measurable record of change—glaciers advance with cooling temperatures and retreat with warming. Currently, meltwater from the glaciers provides an important late-season water source, and a year-round source of cold water key for native aquatic species. As glaciers disappear, this important water source will disappear. There are up to eleven glaciers in the park today. Ten glaciers named on area maps include Teton, Middle Teton, Teepe, Schoolroom, Petersen, Skillet, Falling Ice and Triple. Scientists recently identified another unnamed glacier below Glacier Peak bringing the total to eleven. Some of these glaciers may no longer be moving and are now remnant glaciers. a Snickers bar slowly. The brittle chocolate fractures while the caramel and nougat bends. Measuring glacier movement is difficult, but crevasses can indicate that ice is likely moving. Crevasses form when the brittle upper layer of the glacier cracks as the more ductile ice beneath flows over obstacles or around corners. Imagine bending The park’s modern glaciers are not remnants of the larger Pleistocene Ice Age glaciers that shaped the Teton Range’s canyons and valley-floor lakes. Those glaciers disappeared by 10,000 years ago. In addition to ecological benefits, glaciers are also an iconic part of the Teton landscape providing aesthetic and recreational value. Imagine Mount Moran no longer flanked by five glaciers—the Skillet Glacier gone forever. Glaciers flow, on average, inches to feet per day. Smaller glaciers with flatter surfaces, like the ones in the park, move slowly—probably less than a few inches per day in the summer. In winter, the ice freezes to the bedrock so glacial flow ceases. Studies from the 1960s and 70s measured Teton Glacier flowing about 30 feet (9.1 meters) per year—averaging a few inches (<10 cm) per day during the summer. Instead, current glaciers developed during a recent cold period known as the Little Ice Age that lasted from about 1300 to 1850. Ice Thickness Glacial ice flows over uneven bedrock. Even with surface data, estimating ice thickness is difficult. Researchers can use ground-penetrating radar to calculate ice thickness, but these surveys are costly and time-intensive. Retreat & Disappearance When Fritiof Fryxell first surveyed the park’s glaciers in the late 1920s, the ice was already retreating. The terminal moraines he mapped marked the 1850 glacial maxima of the Little Ice Age. Even though the glaciers are retreating, there have been a few brief glacial advances in 1975–83 and 2006–09. Some people in the late 1970s feared another ice age! The park’s glaciers likely range from less than one hundred to a few hundred feet thick. The only known field measurement of ice thickness was done in 1966, and the Teton Glacier was 64 feet (19.5 meters) thick near its terminus. Methods to track glacial retreat include measuring decreases in the length of the glacier, surface area and ice volume. One study of the Teton Glacier measured 104 feet (32 meters) of retreat from 1954 to 1994. Another study from the late 1980s estimated 600 feet (183 meters) of retreat and 160­ 200 feet (49-61 meters) of thinning since 1929. The park’s glaciers are small but they do vary in size, shape, aspect and slope making predictions of their disappearance difficult. The smallest glaciers, such as Teepe Glacier, have likely stopped moving and may disappear within decades. Larger glaciers, such as the Teton and Middle Teton glaciers, may last for more than one hundred years. Ongoing studies of ice volume change will quantify how quickly glaciers are melting. On-going Studies Researchers are currently measuring ice loss and mapping surface changes for several park glaciers. Park GIS staff teamed with the Jenny Lake climbing rangers to collect hundreds of GPS data points to generate a map of a glacier’s surface. Annual surveys will allow scientists to determine how much ice volume is lost and changes to the glacier’s surface. The team surveyed Schoolroom Glacier in 2014, and Middle Teton Glacier in 2015 and 2016 with plans to continue. Jenny Lake climbing
Fall Colors in the Tetons Grand Teton National Park is a wonderful place to visit any time of year, but fall is especially magical for a number of reasons. Beautiful fall colors, wildlife, and few crowds make for a wonderful and relaxing time of year. Visitors often want to know when the fall occurs and when the peak for fall colors happens. In general, fall in the Tetons lasts from the beginning of September until about mid-October. But like all natural events, fall too depends on local climatic conditions. The amount of rainfall and the nighttime temperatures both play important roles in determining fall colors. While no one can accurately predict exact “peaks” of fall colors, in the Tetons, the third week has historically been about the peak week for fall colors. And of course, some years are better than others are! No matter when you come in the fall, the park holds many wonders to explore. The Teton Range has large stands of deciduous trees whose leaves blaze mostly yellow and orange (and occasionally red) shades in the fall. Cottonwoods line the banks of the Snake River and other creeks in the area. Aspens are found on hillsides and scattered throughout the park’s moist areas. Numerous species of willows, as well as other shrubs, transform lake and canyon trails into yellow and red carpets in the fall. Fall is also an important time for the deer species, whose annual rut (breeding season) takes place during this time. Male elk actively bugle to signal their dominance and attract females, an eerie sound that pierces early evenings. You may even witness a sparring match between two dominant male elk — truly an incredible sight to behold. The bull moose in the park are also actively searching for females as well and may at times spar for dominance too. Bears are actively searching for the berries and any other food source they can find, as they only have a few short weeks left to gain the additional fat they will need to survive hibernation. Since so much wildlife is active (and often aggressive) in the fall, please enjoy viewing them from your car, or a safe distance away (25 yards at least for most wildlife, and 100 yards for bears).
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Mammals The diverse wildlife in Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway complements the spectacular scenery. As part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, these two national parks contain numerous communities. Each community must supply the basic needs of wildlife: food, water, shelter and space. Familiarity with wildlife communities and behaviors allows you to improve your chance of viewing these animals in their environment. Communities Alpine Elevation, wind, harsh winters and brief summers force the plants and animals living here to adapt. Plants grow as mats and animals are few. Look for yellow-bellied marmots, pikas and bighorn sheep seeking shelter in rocky outcrops. Forests From treeline to valley floor, forests provide cover and food for many mammal species. Lodgepole pines dominate, but forests also contain other pines, firs, aspens and spruces. Look for elk, mule deer, martens, red squirrels, black bears and snowshoe hares. Where to Look: Driving and Hiking Northern Jackson Lake Highway 89/191/287 follows the eastern shore of Jackson Lake north of Colter Bay. Enjoy a view of the Teton Range and look for wildlife in the aspen groves and meadows alternating with extensive conifer forests. Lush meadows attract mule deer and elk, while the lake attracts American white pelicans, Canada geese and other waterfowl. Colter Bay Sagebrush, meadows and forests provide habitat for many mammals. Deer feed at the edge of conifer forests. Uinta ground squirrels flourish in dry sagebrush meadows, while red squirrels chatter incessantly from conifer forests. Look for occasional snowshoe hares and martens. Trails lead to ponds inhabited by beavers, muskrats, waterfowl and river otters, or may provide a view of bear, moose or elk. Willow Flats North of the Jackson Lake Dam moose browse on willow shrubs. At dawn and dusk, elk graze on grasses growing among willows. Predators such as wolves and grizzly bears pursue elk calves in early summer. Beavers create ponds by damming streams that also harbor muskrats and waterfowl. Oxbow Bend The slow-moving water of this cut-off meander of the Snake River provides habitat for fish such as suckers and trout that become food for river otters, beaver and muskrats. Moose browse on abundant willows at the water’s edge. Elk graze in the open aspen groves to the east while grizzly bears occasionally look for prey. Teton Park Road Extensive sagebrush flats are interspersed with stands of lodgepole pines and aspens. Pronghorn Sagebrush Sagebrush flats occur on semi-arid, rocky soils covering the valley floor. More than 100 species of grasses and wildflowers flourish along with sagebrush. Lack of cover makes large animals conspicuous. Look for pronghorns, coyotes, bison, badgers, elk and Uinta ground squirrels. Rivers, Lakes and Ponds Aquatic habitats and adjacent forests, marshes and meadows fulfill the needs of many forms of wildlife. Diverse and abundant vegetation offers excellent food and cover. Look for moose, river otters, beavers, muskrats, coyotes and mule deer. gather in small groups where they browse on sagebrush. Black bears cross between forests and plains. At dawn and dusk look for elk grazing on grasses on the forest edge. Snake River This riparian area attracts a variety of wildlife. Elk and bison graze in grassy meadows along the river. Bison also eat grasses in the sagebrush flats on the benches above the river. Moose eat willows that line the waterway, and beaver strip bark. Blacktail Ponds This turnout is located 0.5 mile north of Moose Junction on Highway 26/89/191. Old beaver ponds have filled in and now support grassy meadows where elk graze during cool parts of the day. Moose browse on willows growing along the river. Two Ocean and Emma Matilda Lakes Elk graze during dawn and dusk, and seek refuge from the heat of the day in nearby forests. Moose browse on willows growing along the lakeshore. Mule deer, coyotes, black and grizzly bears, martens and red squirrels also frequent this area. Cascade and Death Canyons Look and listen for pikas and marmots in boulder fields along the trails. Moose browse on willows and other shrubs growing along creeks. Black bears frequent the canyons and grizzly bears are becoming more common. Taggart Lake and Beaver Creek Willows growing along Beaver Creek provide food for moose. Elk graze on lush grasses and deer browse on shrubs while black bears sometimes frequent the area. Mammal List Order Artiodactyla (Even-toed Ungulates) Antilocapridae – Pronghorn Family c Pronghorn Antilocapra americana Order Lagomorpha (Rabbits and Hares) c American Pika Ochotona princeps c Snowshoe Hare Lepus americanus Bovidae – Cattle Family c Bison Bos bison r Mountain Goat Oreamnos americanus u Bighorn Sheep Ovis canadensis Order Rodentia (Gnawing Mammals) c Yellow-pine Ch
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Common Plants Alpine forget-me-not Ofcial park fower Wildfowers color the Tetons as the snow melts. As the snow level gradually retreats up the mountain canyons, wildfowers of every color blossom, brightening valley then canyon. The diverse communities of the park give rise to diferent wildfowers at diferent times at diferent elvations throughout the summer. While valley fowers may have faded by July, blooms are just opening at the higher elevations. Learn more about the fowers and communities found here in Grand Teton National Park. Growing Zones Valley (6,400 - 7,000 feet) Porous, rocky valley soils support plants able to tolerate warm, dry conditions. In addition to abundant sagebrush, numerous wildfowers and grasses grow. During June and July, a profusion of color enlivens the valley: yellow balsamroot, blue lupine, and red gilia. During August, sunfowers replace balsamroot. Canyons (7,000 - 10,000 feet) Between the crags of the Tetons, ice age glaciers carved deep canyons. Today, the canyons contain dense conifer forests and open meadows of Trees Most of the trees in the park are conifers because of the short growing season. Conifers retain their leaves (needles) throughout the year and can produce food (photosynthesize) on warm spring days. Deciduous trees shed their leaves in the fall and grow new ones each spring before they can photosynthesize. Aspens and cottonwoods have chlorophyll in the bark and so they can photosynthesize before producing leaves. Lodgepole pine, the most abundant conifer, grows on the lower mountain slopes and in welldrained glacial soils throughout the valley. Needles are 2-3 inches long, clustered in bundles of 2; cones are 1-2 inches long. Douglas-fr, not a true fr, inhabits dry south- to east-facing slopes. Large diameter trees have coarse, furrowed bark. Needles are fat and 1 inch long; cones have a 3-pointed bract Subalpine fr grows on wetter north-facing valley sites and at higher elevations. Smooth bark and spire-like growth identify subalpine fr. Needles are fat and 1 inch long. Cones are purple grow upright on branches. Shrubs Big sagebrush thrives in dry habitats and carpets most of the valley foor. Plants are one to fve feet tall; leaves are grayish green. Tiny yellow fowers bloom in August. Antelope bitterbrush occurs with sagebrush in the southern half of Jackson Hole. Bitterbrush grows to three feet fall. Cream-colored fowers bloom in June. Huckleberry grows two to four feet tall in lodgepole pine forests in the valley and mountain canyons. Purple berries are produced in August. Serviceberry grows to ten feet tall. Showy white fowers bloom in spring, producing purple berries by late summer. Chokecherry is a grows to twenty feet tall. Cylindrical clusters of showy white fowers bloom wildfowers. As elevation increases, wildfowers abound while trees become stunted and eventually shrub-like. “Krummholz” (German for “crooked wood”) plants are dwarfed forms that are treelike at lower elevations. Alpine (above 10,000 feet) Above treeline, plants adapt to wind, snow, and lack of soil by growing close to the ground. Alpine plants take advantage of a brief growing season by fowering soon after the snow melts. Some species grow only in the alpine area; others grow taller at lower elevations, but are dwarfed in the alpine. Engelmann spruce occurs with subalpine fr. Rough bark and abundant cones hanging down from upper branches identify Engelmann spruce. Needles are sharp, four-sided and occur singly and cones are 1.5 inches long with papery scales. Blue spruce lines rivers and creeks in the valley. Cones have papery scales and are twice as large as those found on Engelmann spruce. Spruce needles are sharp, four-sided, and occur singly. Limber pines grow individually on open, dry valley sites. Needles grow in bundles of 5. Cones are 4-8 inches long. Whitebark pine grows above 8,000 feet. Needles are in bundles of 5. Cones are purple and smaller than those of limber pine. Aspen grows in stands on level, moist sites and on dry slopes. Aspen bark is smooth and greenish, cream-colored. Reproduction is primarily from shoots sprouting from horizontal roots. Cottonwoods, close relatives of aspens, grow along rivers and creeks in the valley. Bark on mature trees is heavily furrowed. The species here hybridize freely so identifcation of individual species may be difcult. in spring, and turn to dark red berries by August. Utah honeysuckle grows in open lodgepole pine forests. Leaves are opposite. Paired cream-colored fowers bloom in early June, producing red unpalatable berries. Mountain ash grows as a tall shrub on lower mountain slopes. Flat-topped clusters of white fowers bloom in June. In fall, bright orange fruits complement vivid red compound leaves. Willows occur in moist areas, especially along stream banks. Twenty species are found in
Grand Teton National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway 11,000 Years of Human Influence: The Archeological Record What is Archeology? Archeology is the study of past human cultures, technologies and behaviors based on artifacts, landscapes, written records and oral histories. Archeologists consider projectile points, animal bones, pottery, food remains, clothing and wood to be artifacts. Archeologists examine both historic and prehistoric (before written history) artifacts through surface and subsurface explorations, known as survey and excavation, to research and record the evolution of past human societies. Archeologists attempt to understand aspects of past human culture and society, such as diet, housing, migration, and hunting and cooking methods. The goals are to put together a sequence of events and dates explaining human past; to identify ways of life that no longer exist; and to create an understanding of how and why human cultures evolve. Archeology in Grand Teton National Park In 1971, Charles Love began archeological research in Grand Teton National Park. Love discovered, recorded and analyzed an immense volume of archeological information from the park, creating the foundation for future work. Since then, archeologists working for the National Park Service and other institutions have continued to study aspects of prehistoric lifestyles, establishing archeology as an important aspect of Grand Teton National Park. Jackson Hole Prehistory The first humans entered the Jackson Hole valley roughly 11,000 years ago, shortly after ice-age glaciers retreated. Archeologists believe that Paleoindian hunter-gatherers, 11,000 to 8,000 years ago, spent the late spring and summer in the valley following wildlife and ripening plants. They killed large animals such as bison and elk with projectile point spears including: Agate Basin, Hell Gap and Cody-type points (Figure 1). Most of these points were flaked from obsidian, volcanic glass found in the area. Artifacts that date from the Archaic period, 8,000 to 1,500 years ago increased in number and variety. This shift suggests more people entered the valley and they needed new technologies due to a changing environment and different wildlife. Prehistoric people began using roasting pits, large cooking pits lined with heated stones, around 5,900 years ago. Figure 1. Timeline of Grand Teton National Park prehistory E X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C A™ 7/2012 Jackson Hole Prehistory (continued) Projectile points made of obsidian evolved to have side notches, indentations on the sides of a point used to attach a point to a spear. These points include McKean and Pelican Lake-type points (Figure 1). Tipi rings, stone circles used to hold down the bottom of skin-covered structures, and stone-grinding tools, rocks used to grind food, also date to the Archaic period (Figure 2). Tools continued to evolve from the Archaic to the Late Prehistoric period 1,500 years ago. Late Prehistoric populations began using the bow and arrow as their primary hunting tool (Figure 3). Using an arrow decreased the size of the projectile point from the larger spear point. People also started shaping soapstone bowls and clay pottery (Figure 4). Archeologists believe hunter-gatherers in Jackson Hole decreased their seasonal travel during this period, remaining in the valley for a longer period of time. There is no archeological evidence suggesting prehistoric populations cultivated crops or established permanent settlements in the valley. Throughout prehistory people hunted deer, elk, bighorn sheep, bison and fish; and gathered cattail, berries, roots and tubers for food. Food remains combined with other artifacts help archeologists interpret the prehistory of Jackson Hole. Archeological research in Grand Teton National Park and the Jackson Hole valley continues to expand our understanding of past human cultures, technologies and behaviors. Archeology is an integral part of the National Park Service’s mission to preserve natural and cultural resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Protohistoric period lasted from 1700 to 1850 in Jackson Hole. During this period, Indians traded European goods such as beads, axes, knives, kettles and horses, but kept no records. After 1850, survey crews began documenting information about the valley. Figure 4. Soapstone Bowls Figure 2. Grinding Stone Figure 3. Bow and Arrows How you can help: Saving the Past for the Future • Do not collect archeological artifacts. Collecting artifacts from federal land is illegal. Artifacts are fragile, easily disturbed, and nonrenewable. If properly studied, artifacts may provide new and important information about the past. If artifacts are disturbed, vital information may be lost. • If you find an artifact, record the location as accurately as possible, do not disturb t
CREATION OF GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK (A Thumbnail History) The birth of present-day Grand Teton National Park involved controversy and a struggle that lasted several decades. Animosity toward expanding governmental control and a perceived loss of individual freedoms fueled anti-park sentiments in Jackson Hole that nearly derailed establishment of the park. By contrast, Yellowstone National Park benefited from an expedient and near universal agreement for its creation in 1872. The world’s first national park took only two years from idea to reality; however Grand Teton National Park evolved through a burdensome process requiring three separate governmental acts and a series of compromises. • • • The original Grand Teton National Park, set aside by an act of Congress in 1929, included only the Teton Range and six glacial lakes at the base of the mountains. The Jackson Hole National Monument, decreed by Franklin Delano Roosevelt through presidential proclamation in 1943, combined Teton National Forest acreage, other federal properties including Jackson Lake and a generous 35,000-acre donation by John D. Rockefeller, Jr. The Rockefeller lands continued to be privately held until December 16, 1949 when impasse for addition to the national park was resolved. On September 14, 1950, the original 1929 Park and the 1943 National Monument (including Rockefeller’s donation) were united into a “new” Grand Teton National Park, creating present-day boundaries. As early as 1897, Colonel S.B.M. Young, acting Superintendent of Yellowstone, proposed to expand Yellowstone’s boundaries southward to encompass portions of northern Jackson Hole and protect migrating elk herds. In 1898 Charles D. Walcott, head of the U.S. Geological Survey, made a similar proposal, suggesting that the Teton Range be included as well as northern Jackson Hole. Neither the Interior Department nor Congress acted on either of these proposals. In 1916, a new bureau called the National Park Service was created within the Department of Interior. This bureau could promote park ideas both locally and at the national level with the creation of a Washington DC office. Director of the National Park Service, Stephen Mather and his assistant, Horace Albright affirmed their commitment toward park expansion in a 1917 report to Secretary of the Interior, Franklin Lane. The report stated that adding part of the Tetons, Jackson Lake, and headwaters of the Snake River to Yellowstone National Park is “one of seven urgent needs facing the Park Service." Mather and Albright worked with the Wyoming congressional delegation to draft a bill addressing expansion of Yellowstone’s boundaries into the Teton country. Congressman Frank Mondell of Wyoming introduced the bill in 1918. The House unanimously approved a revised bill in 1919. However, the bill died in the Senate when Idaho Senator John Nugent feared the loss of sheep grazing permits with expanded park service jurisdiction. As historian Robert Righter states, “an opportunity had been lost. Never again would park extension be so non-controversial.” In addition to Idaho sheep ranchers, other groups opposed park extension; these included regional U.S. Forest Service personnel, Jackson Hole businessmen, and some area ranchers. In 1919 Yellowstone Superintendent, Horace Albright was unaware of the pervasive anti-park attitude in Jackson Hole. As a result, he was practically “run out of town” when he traveled to Jackson to promote his park enlargement vision. Ranchers worried that park extension would reduce grazing allotments; Forest Service employees feared the loss of jurisdiction on previously managed forest areas; and local dude ranchers were against improved roads, hotel construction and concessioner monopolies. Proposals emerged to dam outlets of Jenny Lake and Emma Matilda and Two Ocean Lakes in 1919. Alarmed businessmen and ranchers felt that some form of protection by the National Park Service might be their only salvation from commercialization and natural resource destruction. Eventually, local and National Park Service interests merged at an historic meeting in Maud Noble’s cabin on July 26, 1923. Participants included Yellowstone Superintendent, Horace Albright; Bar BC dude ranchers, Struthers Burt and Horace Carncross; newspaperman, Dick Winger; grocery storeowner, Joe Jones; rancher, Jack Eynon; and ferry owner, Maud Noble. They devised a strategy. Their plan sought to find private funds to purchase private lands in Jackson Hole and create a recreation area or reserve that would preserve the “Old West” character of the valley, basically creating a “museum on the hoof." With the exception of Horace Albright, the attendees did not support a national park, “because they wanted traditional hunting, grazing, and dude-ranching activities to continue.” In 1928, a Coordinating Commission on National Parks and Forests met with residents of Jackson and reached consensus for park approval. Local support and the Comm
Grand Teton John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway National Park P.O. Drawer 170 Moose, Wyoming 83012 307 739-3300 A Walk Through Time The Earliest Visitors Archeological studies established human occupation of Jackson Hole for at least 11,000 years. Knowledge of early people is extremely limited. Data suggests that they used the area from spring to fall, based on seasonal availability of resources. Prehistoric people crossed the passes into Jackson Hole en route to seasonal hunting grounds in the region. In historic times, Indian tribes such as the Shoshoni, Gros Ventre, Flathead and Blackfeet knew the Teton country. Days of Mountain Men The splendor of the Teton Mountains first dazzled fur traders. Although evidence is inconclusive, John Colter probably explored the area in 1808. By the 1820s, mountain men followed wildlife and Indian trails through Jackson Hole and trapped beaver in the icy waters of the valley. The term “hole” was coined by fur trappers of the 1820s to describe a high altitude plateau ringed by mountains. Thus, Jackson Hole is the entire valley, 8 to 15 miles wide and 40 miles long. The valley was named for David E. Jackson, a trapper who reputedly spent the winter of 1829 along the shore of Jackson Lake. After the decline of the fur trade in the late 1830s, America forgot Jackson Hole until the military and civilian surveys of the 1860s and 1870s. Members of the Hayden Survey named many of the area’s features. Settlers at the Turn of the Century Because of its geographic location, Jackson Hole remained unsettled until late in the 19th century. The first permanent homesteaders, John Holland and John Carnes, settled north of the present town of Jackson. By 1890 Jackson Hole had a population of 64 people. The soils and climate made ranching and farming risky. Mountain-valley ranching was the chief occupation; settlers grazed cattle on the public domain in the mountains while cultivating hay in the valley to provide winter feed. While a few prospered, most lived at a near-subsistence level. As settlement progressed, small communities emerged to provide goods and services. By 1910 Jackson, Wilson, Kelly and Moran had become the dominant villages in Jackson Hole. Elk, Marysvale, Grovont, Zenith and Menor’s Ferry had post offices. Incorporated in 1914, Jackson became the seat of Teton County and the commercial center of the valley. The First Tourists The region acquired a national reputation for its splendid hunting and fishing in the 1880s and 1890s. Many settlers supplemented their incomes by serving as guides and packers for wealthy hunters. A few, such as Ben Sheffield, made it a full-time occupation. He acquired a ranch at the outlet of Jackson Lake in 1902 to use as a base for outfitting his expeditions. The ranch became the town of Moran. Others recognized that dudes winter better than cows and began operating dude ranches. The JY and the Bar BC were established in 1908 and 1912, respectively. By the 1920s, dude ranching made significant contributions to the valley’s economy. At this time some local residents realized that scenery and wildlife (especially elk) were valuable resources to be conserved rather than exploited. The Jackson Hole Story Continues Much of the recorded history of Jackson Hole involves the story of Grand Teton National Park. The emergence of the conservation movement in the United States prevented the transfer of public lands to private ownership in the Tetons. Through the Forest Reserve Act of 1891, President Grover Cleveland established the Teton Forest Reserve in 1897. Teton National Forest was created in 1908. These reserves included much of the land of Jackson Hole. Congress established Grand Teton National Park in 1929. The 96,000 acre Park included the main portion of the Teton Range and most of the glacial lakes at the base of the mountains. After touring the area in 1926, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., decided to buy private lands in Jackson Hole for Park use. Rockefeller's agents formed the Snake River Land Company that purchased over 35,000 acres during the next 20 years. Political controversy defeated attempts to add the valley to the Park in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1943 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued a proclamation establishing Jackson Hole National Monument by authority of the Antiquities Act of 1906. The 210,000 acre monument included most federal land in Jackson Hole. In 1949 the Rockefellers donated nearly 33,000 acres to the federal government and in 1950, Congress passed legislation merging the Park and National Monument. Today tourism is the cornerstone of the local economy. Visitors come to enjoy breathtaking scenery, wildlife and other natural features of Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway. Printed on recycled paper 2-4-95
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Grand Teton John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Built Beneath the Mountains Historic Properties in Grand Teton National Park EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ John and Bertha Moulton Barn Mormon Row An Overview to Historic Properties Historic structures and properties in Grand Teton National Park stand in silent testimony to the stories of human exploration, pioneering settlement, ranching, conservation and park protection. Primarily constructed of logs, using local materials, historic properties throughout the valley of Jackson Hole reflect local craftsmanship and unique architecture developed in isolated conditions. Preserved in National Historic Landmarks, historic districts and cultural landscapes, historic properties in the park reflect the human spirit of “putting down roots” and living free in a remote and wild country. History is not the primary reason visitors flock to Grand Teton National Park. Yet the park contains hundreds of places that tell the human story of the park and connect to American history. The National Park Service protects these structures as carefully as their famous wildlife and scenery. Cultural Resources Numbers: The valley opened to homesteading under the Homestead Act of 1862. Many homesteaders eventually sold their property to John D. Rockefeller, Jr. through his Snake River Land Company. Use this booklet as your guide to visit a settler’s cabin or the original ranger station while you learn about the past and look toward the future of preserving this place. • 695 historic properties in 44 districts. • All properties are eligible for, or listed in the National Register of Historic Places. • Properties are classified by their condition as ‘good, fair or poor.’ • More than half of the park’s properties are rated as being in ‘good’ condition. Jackson Lake Lodge Back Deck Historic Properties 1 White Grass Dude Ranch Cabin undergoing rehabilitation work in 2008. Management In an effort to preserve Grand Teton National Park’s historic properties, the Historic Properties Management Plan guides management of historic structures and coordinates funding for continuing education and resource protection. Currently, more than half of the park’s historic properties are rated in ‘good Cultural Resources Defined: • National Register of Historic Places: The official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of protection. To be eligible a property must be at least 50 years old, retain its original appearance and have historical significance. • National Historic Landmark: A nationally significant historic place that possesses exceptional value or quality in illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United States. condition’ with many serving as offices, housing, guest rooms, living history exhibits, education centers, agricultural purposes and storage. Structures rated in ‘poor condition’ are stabilized preventing further deterioration by maintaining the structure’s exterior, or bracing remnants preserving their station in the cultural landscape. There are only 2,500 nationwide including two in Grand Teton National Park—the Murie Ranch and Jackson Lake Lodge. • Cultural Landscape: A geographic area, including natural and cultural resources, associated with a historic event, activity or person. • Secretary of Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties: The National Park Service standards for maintaining, repairing and replacing historic materials. National Park Service 2 µ A Driving Tour JOHN JOHN D. D. RO ROCKEFELLER, CKEFELLER, JR. JR. MEMORIAL MEMORIAL PARKWAY PARKWAY Visit the park’s many historic districts to learn about the hardships Historic Properties Tour homesteaders endured, the dude ranch period, the events leading to park expansion, the early conservation movement and the evolution of the park into a world-class destination. The number next to each 89 £ ¤ 1a 91 narrative in this booklet. district on the map corresponds to £ ¤ 287 £ ¤ GRAND TETON 10 AMK ! Ranch N AT IO N A L PA R K Em m a M a t i l da L ak e Jackson Lake r k Ro a d MORAN to Te 9 n Cunningham ! Cabin 8 7 Jenny Lak e Elk Ranch Turnout ! Pa Lei gh Lak e Lake ! Jenny Ranger Station 26 £ ¤ 89 £ ¤ 3 Chapel of the £ ¤ 191 Transfiguration Maud Noble Cabin Menors Ferry 4 White Grass Ranch ! Ro a 1 MOOSE n o s ! 2 6 Murie Ranch se - M oo F la Mormon Row ! d pe ts ! W l i A n tel o G ro s V en Luther Taylor !Cabins 5 t re 5 ! Miles Historic Properties 3 X:\ProjectData\Cultural\Historical\HPMP\2015\HistoricTourBrochure_8x5.mxd White Grass Dude Ranch Main Lodge after preservation. 1 White Grass Dude Ranch The White Grass Dude Ranch is an iconic example of dude ranching in Jackson Hole. Homesteaded in 1913 by Harold Hammond and George Bispham, White Grass operated as a cattle ranch until 1919 when they converted operations to dude ranching. The National Park Service purc

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