"Memorial Bridge and Avenue" by NPS , public domain

George Washington

Memorial Parkway - DC, MD, VA

The George Washington Memorial Parkway, colloquially the G.W. Parkway, is a 25-mile-long (40 km) parkway that runs along the south bank of the Potomac River from Mount Vernon, Virginia, northwest to Langley, Virginia, and is maintained by the National Park Service (NPS). It is located almost entirely within Virginia, except for a short portion of the parkway northwest of the Arlington Memorial Bridge that passes over Columbia Island within the District of Columbia. The parkway is separated into two sections joined by Washington Street (State Route 400) in Alexandria. A third section, which is the Clara Barton Parkway, runs on the opposite side of the Potomac River in the District of Columbia and suburban Montgomery County, Maryland. A fourth section was originally proposed for Fort Washington, Maryland, but never built. The parkway has been designated an All-American Road.

location

maps

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Mall and Memorial Parks - National Heritage Areas

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Rock Creek Park - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Piscataway Park in Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Piscataway - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Piscataway Park in Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/gwmp/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington_Memorial_Parkway The George Washington Memorial Parkway, colloquially the G.W. Parkway, is a 25-mile-long (40 km) parkway that runs along the south bank of the Potomac River from Mount Vernon, Virginia, northwest to Langley, Virginia, and is maintained by the National Park Service (NPS). It is located almost entirely within Virginia, except for a short portion of the parkway northwest of the Arlington Memorial Bridge that passes over Columbia Island within the District of Columbia. The parkway is separated into two sections joined by Washington Street (State Route 400) in Alexandria. A third section, which is the Clara Barton Parkway, runs on the opposite side of the Potomac River in the District of Columbia and suburban Montgomery County, Maryland. A fourth section was originally proposed for Fort Washington, Maryland, but never built. The parkway has been designated an All-American Road. The George Washington Memorial Parkway was designed for recreational driving. It links sites that commemorate important episodes in American history and preserve habitat for local wildlife. The parkway and its associated trails provide a scenic place to play and rest in the busy Washington, DC metropolitan area. Directions to Parkway Headquarters From the south, take the George Washington Memorial Parkway north. Just past the CIA exit turn right into the parking lot for the US Park Police and parkway headquarters. Go through the chain link fence and take an immediate right. Follow the road down to a stop sign and turn right into the parking lot for the headquarters building. George Washington Memorial Parkway Stone Bridge Stone Bridge Along the George Washington Memorial Parkway George Washington Memorial Parkway George Washington Memorial Parkway A view of the Parkway A beautiful drive United States Marine Corps War Memorial United States Marine Corps War Memorial United States Marine Corps War Memorial at night Netherlands Carillon in Spring Netherlands Carillon in Spring Netherlands Carillon in Spring The Navy and Merchant Marine Memorial The Navy and Merchant Marine Memorial The Navy and Merchant Marine Memorial Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit Lichens and Air Quality Lichens are durable enough to grow on tree bark and bare rock, yet are sensitive to pollution and air quality. One species in particular was used to track levels of air-borne lead over a 100 year period! Pale green lichen growing on rock. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Sense of Wilderness: New Perspectives on Theodore Roosevelt Island Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. designed the memorial landscape of Theodore Roosevelt Island to evoke a sense of wilderness. In this wooded sanctuary, located on the Potomac River between the cities of Washington, DC and Rosslyn, Virginia, the park hosts multi-sensory nature walks that invite blind, visually impaired, and sighted visitors to explore the landscape through touch, sound, smell, and taste. A blue sky is reflected in a marshy areas of calm water, surrounded by bright green trees. African Americans and the Civil War Forts of DC The 28th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops was one of the troops attached to the Defenses of Washington. This regiment of infantry was established on November 30, 1863 by Indiana Governor Oliver P. Morton. Reverend Willis Revels of the African American Episcopal Church was the chief recruiting officer. The recruits trained for three months and on April 25 1863, six companies of the 28th left Indianapolis for Washington, D.C. where they were attached to the capital’s defenses. african american civil war soldiers stand in front of white building Native Peoples of Washington, DC The village of Nacotchtank (from which the name Anacostia is derived) was the largest of the three American Indian villages located in the Washington area and is believed to have been a major trading center. three native americans seated, black and white photo NPS Geodiversity Atlas—George Washington Memorial Parkway, Washington D.C., Maryland, and West Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] parkway and bridge Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. Virginia Shipbuilding Corporation When the United States entered World War I on April 6, 1917, the US Navy had already been engaged in a building program under the Naval Act of 1916. However, it was a peacetime Act. The wartime needs of a robust American merchant marine were a different matter, and this led to the rapid expansion of shipbuilding, particularly on the east coast. Timber strewn across a yard and scaffolding with ships being built in background American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees George Washington Memorial Parkway - North Cultural Landscape The George Washington Parkway appears as a four-lane roadway divided by a median, containing a blend of natural components and designed landscape features. The parkway is also a passage into a history of planning in Washington, D.C., early 1950s engineering and transportation innovations, an example of well-designed landscape architecture, and historical and commemorative associations with George Washington. Sunlight filters through a thick canopy of leafy trees, which surrounds both sides of a road. Citizen Science and Entomology Citizen scientists worked at the Turkey Run Park, Great Falls Park and Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve areas of the Parkway. Various trapping methods were utilized, including Malaise, Lindgren funnel, and pan traps, black-light, beating sheets, and sporadic collecting by hand. As of 2018, over 1000 species of beetles have been documented. Experts were able to identify 754 different beetle species, more than half of which had never before been recorded in the Parkway. NPS beetles and citizen science Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Area parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Lady Bird Johnson Park Cultural Landscape Lady Bird Johnson Park is a constructed 157-acre island that extends along the Virginia shore of the Potomac River. Originally known as Columbia Island, the island was created between about 1915 and 1930 to serve as the western terminus of Arlington Memorial Bridge and a symbolic entrance into Nation’s Capital. Daffodils bloom on the Mount Vernon Trail near Memorial Bridge Fort Hunt Park Cultural Landscape Fort Hunt Park is a recreational area of 190 acres in Fairfax County, Virginia. Fort Hunt was part of an improved system of Coastal Defenses erected throughout the United States in the 1890s following the recommendations of the Endicott Board, which had been convened to assess the changing needs of modern naval warfare and the United States’ new role as an international power. Fort Hunt Area C-1 can accommodate up to 100 people and 40 cars (NPS) Memorial Avenue Corridor Cultural Landscape Memorial Avenue Corridor is a name applied to the mile-long axial composition that includes Arlington Memorial Bridge, Memorial Circle, Memorial Avenue Bridge, Memorial Avenue, and the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery. The architectural, engineering, sculptural, and landscape features of the corridor were important elements in the neoclassical design of the national capital as it evolved during the first third of the 20th century. Eagle statuary atop stone pillars on either side of a wide road bridge Arlington Ridge Park Cultural Landscape With its elevated view of the District of Columbia, the Arlington Ridge Park site has been regarded as a prime location for several memorials. The landscape is situated on a ridge above the Potomac River in Arlington, VA. It contains two major memorials and their associated designed landscapes: the 1954 U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial, and the 1960 Netherlands Carillon. Visitors during the 1950s gather at the U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial. POWs and Intel at Fort Hunt in World War II During World War II, Fort Hunt was the location of a top-secret military intelligence installation (P.O. Box 1142), where high value German captives were interrogated, and means were developed for the escape of captured U.S. servicemen. After the War, some German scientists who chose to come to the U.S. rather than go to the Soviet Union were debriefed at Fort Hunt. image of Fort Hunt in World War II Herbert Hoover's National Parks Herbert Hoover is not thought of as one of our better presidents, but he made lasting contributions in the national parks he established. During Herbert Hoover's presidency from 1929 to 1933, the land designated for new national parks and monuments increased by 40 percent. Sepia photo of Herbert Hoover standing at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Amphibian Disease Risk in the National Capital Area Looking for disease, including ranaviruses and chytrid fungi, is an important part of amphibian monitoring done by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Learn more about the risks posed by these diseases and the biosecurity protocols field crews use to reduce the risk of accidental spread. Red-spotted newt on brown forest floor leaves. Black spots and eyes contrast with vivid orange skin. Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. American Chestnuts in the Capital Region In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in parks of the National Capital Region Green American chestnut tree leaves on a slender branch. Freshwater Sponges Freshwater sponges are found in lakes and streams growing on firm substrates like rocks and branches. They feed by filtering small particles from the water. Though little is known about these sponges in the Mid-Atlantic, they are usually a sign of good water quality. A freshwater sponges attached to a streambed rock. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Beautification: A Legacy of Lady Bird Johnson As a champion of conservation efforts and environmental causes, Lady Bird Johnson initiated the Beautification Project to improve the quality of life for residents of Washington, D.C. through the renewal and improvement of public spaces. The environmental and aesthetic improvements of Beautification included tree-lined avenues, floral displays, design guidelines, improvements to pedestrian circulation, renovation of historic buildings, and litter clean up. A man in a tie and a woman in a yellow dress sit between an expanse of daffodils and a wide river Discoveries at the Bug Lab How can new species still be found these days, much less at a site sitting inside the Washington, D.C. beltway? The answer lies in looking at lesser known branches of the tree of life, with volunteer citizen scientists, at the unique and biodiverse Potomac Gorge. Three seated women peer into microscopes in a lab Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch DC's Civil War Earthworks Civil War fortifications were based on the European model of the 17th and 18th centuries. Professor Dennis Hart Mahan of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, was the leading authority of fortification engineering. Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Sea Level Rise Impact on DC Parks Sea level rise is occurring on a global scale as the result of many climate change-induced factors. It is impacting 111 National Park Service (NPS) sites nationwide. In the National Capital Region, sea level rise is occurring at a particularly rapid rate because the land bordering the Potomac and Anacostia rivers is simultaneously sinking as the water levels rise. Above view of Dyke Marsh Park Recreation and Climate Change Recreation in the National Parks will be negatively affected by climate change. Here's how parks in the National Capital Area are adapting. Three children sit next to a lake and fish September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air. Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background. Beech Trees in the National Capital Area American beech (Fagus grandifolia), the most common tree species in National Capital Area parks, is currently facing the emerging threat of Beech Leaf Disease (BLD). A forest with healthy green leafed beech trees Overview of the Urban Forests The eight urban forests measured in the Urban Ecology i-Tree analyses are diverse. The following articles explore just a few of the common ecological benefits the urban trees in these parks provide to the parks and the surrounding areas. Overview of the Urban Forests icon of tree silhouettes. Icon put over photo of Prince William Forest Avoided Runoff and Urban Forests Surface runoff, particularly from storms, can be a cause for concern in many urban areas because the large amounts of paved surfaces will increase the amount of water that cannot soak into the ground. These large volumes of stormwater runoff can carry surface impurities into streams, wetlands, rivers, lakes, and oceans, contributing pollution, garbage, and excessive nutrients into aquatic ecosystems. Urban forests, however, are beneficial in reducing surface runoff. Avoided Runoff icon of rain over a tree branch. Icon put over raindrops on red fall leaves Carbon Storage by Urban Forests Climate change is an issue of global concern. Urban trees can help mitigate climate change by storing carbon in tree tissue and sequestering atmospheric carbon from the key greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon Storage & Sequestration icon of CO2 going into a tree. Icon put over photo tree trunk. Air Pollution Removal by Urban Forests Poor air quality is a common problem in many urban areas. It can lead to decreased human health, damage to landscape materials and ecosystem processes, and spoiled scenic views due to reduced visibility. The National Park Service monitors and assesses air quality in park units. The trees in NPS’s urban forests contribute to improved air quality. Air Pollution Removal Icon of green lungs. Icon put over photo of tree canopy gap. Structural Values of Urban Forests A tree’s structural value can be thought of as the cost of having to replace a tree with a similar tree. It can be calculated with factors like the tree trunk area and the tree’s health condition. Various insects and diseases can infest urban forests, potentially killing trees and reducing the health, structural value and sustainability of the urban forest. Structural Values of Trees icon of tree on field. Icon put over photo of snow covered trees. Other Benefits of Urban Forests Other benefits of urban forests include: Trees and Building Energy Use and Oxygen Production. Trees affect energy consumption by shading buildings, providing evaporative cooling, and blocking winter winds. Oxygen production is one of the most commonly cited benefits of urban trees. Other Tree Benefits icon of house with a tree besides it. Icon put over photo of cherry blossoms Incredible Untold Stories of Everyday Life In the Reconstruction period following the Civil War, newly freed African Americans faced monumental challenges to establish their own households, farm their own lands, establish community institutions and churches, and to pursue equal justice under the law in a period of racist violence. A new NPS report presents the story of the extraordinary accomplishments of rural African Americans in Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. Portrait of well dressed Black woman in round spectacles, short natural hair, and lacy white collar Audrey Calhoun The first Black woman in the United States to graduate with a degree in forestry, Audrey Calhoun committed to a career in national parks. Audrey Calhoun poses in her Park Service uniform. Challenging The Ranger Image In spite of programs to encourage hiring of individuals with disabilities, it was often others’ misconceptions or discomfort that prevented women with disabilities from getting National Park Service (NPS) jobs. Those hired in the 1970s and early 1980s brought diverse skillsets and new perspectives to the workforce. Like the earliest women rangers in the 1910s and 1920s, they often only had short-term positions. They all challenged ideas of what it takes to be a park ranger. Ranger Vicky White in a wheelchair with a visitor and man in military dress. Forest Regeneration 2021 The latest look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on monitoring data from 2021. Green forest showing healthy understory of oak seedlings. Resilient Forests Initiative - Managing Deer Impacts A healthy forest needs to have enough tree seedlings and saplings to regenerate the forest canopy after a disturbance. Analysis of NPS I&M and other long-term datasets makes it clear that many eastern national parks lack adequate tree regeneration due to decades of over browsing by white-tailed deer. Deer impacts I&M Networks Support Resilient Forest Management NPS Inventory and Monitoring Networks have been tracking forest health in eastern national parks since 2006. This monitoring information can guide resilient forest management and support parks in adapting to changing conditions through the actions described below. Forest health monitoring Managing Resilient Forests. A Regional Initiative Forests cover tens of thousands of acres in eastern national parks and these critical resources face a range of interacting stressors: over-abundant white-tailed deer populations, invasive plant dominance, novel pests and pathogens, among other threats. The Resilient Forests Initiative will help parks address these issue collectively. Forest health monitoring Regina P. Jones Underwood Brake Regina Jones-Brake's career with the National Park Service (NPS) began in 1976 with the bicentennial of the Declaration of Independence. Over the next 33 years, her love of American history compelled her to share untold stories as she advanced from park ranger to management assistant. Regina Jones-Underwood pictured outdoors in her NPS uniform. Series: Managing Resilient Forests Initiative for Eastern National Parks Forests in the northeastern U.S. are in peril. Over-abundant deer, invasive plants, and insect pests are impacting park forests, threatening to degrade the scenic vistas and forested landscapes that parks are renowned for. With regional collaboration, parks can manage these impacts and help forests be resilient. This article series explores tools available to park managers to achieve their goals. Healthy forests have many native seedlings and saplings. Resilient Forests Initiative - Managing Invasive Plants & Pests Park forests are threatened by invasive plants and pests. Strategically tackling invasive plants to protect park’s highest priority natural resources and planning around forest pests and pathogens are important actions in managing resilient forests. Forest Regeneration

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming