"View of Monument" by NPS Photo , public domain

Hagerman Fossil Beds

National Monument - Idaho

Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument near Hagerman, Idaho, contains the largest concentration of Hagerman horse fossils in North America. The fossil horses for which the monument is famous have been found in only one locale in the northern portion of the monument called the Hagerman Horse Quarry. The monument is internationally significant because it protects the world's richest known fossil deposits from the late Pliocene epoch, 3.5 million years ago. These plants and animals represent the last glimpse of that time that existed before the Ice Age, and the earliest appearances of modern flora and fauna. This is also significant because the fossils present during this period of the Pliocene represent species which were alive during the early stages in the evolution of man, albeit on a different continent.

maps

Official visitor map of Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument (NM) in Idaho. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hagerman Fossil Beds - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument (NM) in Idaho. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/hafo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagerman_Fossil_Beds_National_Monument Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument near Hagerman, Idaho, contains the largest concentration of Hagerman horse fossils in North America. The fossil horses for which the monument is famous have been found in only one locale in the northern portion of the monument called the Hagerman Horse Quarry. The monument is internationally significant because it protects the world's richest known fossil deposits from the late Pliocene epoch, 3.5 million years ago. These plants and animals represent the last glimpse of that time that existed before the Ice Age, and the earliest appearances of modern flora and fauna. This is also significant because the fossils present during this period of the Pliocene represent species which were alive during the early stages in the evolution of man, albeit on a different continent. Did you know that horses evolved in North America? The Hagerman horse, Equus simplicidens, is the first true one-toed horse. It's the park's most famous fossil, but we have fossils from over two hundred other species too! From the saber-toothed cat, mastodon, bear, camel, and ground sloth, to smaller animals like rodents and frogs, the scientific study of Pliocene fossils is the key to Hagerman. When visiting Hagerman Fossil Beds NM we recommend you stop at the Visitor Center, located at 221 N State St, to begin your visit. There you get the latest information, see an introductory DVD, view fossils up close, and obtain helpful information about the amenities available in the area. Hagerman Fossil Beds NM Visitor Center, 221 North State Street, is located along Highway 30 in the town of Hagerman across from the high school. Hagerman Fossil Beds Visitor Center While visiting Hagerman be sure to spend some time exploring the Visitor Center, 221 N State Street., located in town on Route 30 across from the high school. You can become a Junior Ranger, examine fossil replicas, and marvel at our fossil displays. The visitor center is currently closed and will open mid July. We will open a new visitor center called Thousand Springs with our partners, Idaho State Park and Recreation. The park trails are open, and some have outdoor exhibits. Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Visitor Center, 221 North State Street, is located along Highway 30 in the town of Hagerman across from the Hagerman High School. Excavating an Articulated Snake Rangers and the Paleo crew excavate an articulated snake. Rangers and the Paleo crew excavate an articulated snake. Paleontologist Excavating Fossil Skull Paleontologist prepares a skull for excavation. Paleontologist prepares a fossil skull for excavation. Jr Rangers Learn About Paleontology Jr. Rangers around a dig site learn about paleontology. Jr. Rangers learn about paleontology at a fossil site. A Fossil In Situ A picture of a fossil still in the sediment. A picture of a fossil still incased in the sediment. Fossil Cast Going to the Lab A casted fossil is being removed from the Monument and sent to the lab. A casted fossil is being removed from the Monument and sent to the lab. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument, Idaho Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. paleontologist working on a fossil dig Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Wildland Fire in Sagebrush Sagebrush will burn when the surrounding grasses are dry. With strong winds, fire spreads rapidly with flames sometimes reaching over 30 feet high. While fire easily kills sagebrush, the other plants resprout from protected roots producing lush forage for wildlife and livestock. Close-up of sagebrush leaves Explore Your Southern Idaho National Parks Discover southern Idaho's hidden treasures, including Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve, City of Rocks National Reserve, Minidoka National Historic Site, and Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument. A group of people joyfully cut the ceremonial ribbon outside the new Minidoka visitor center. New Discoveries from Old Bones at Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument is a relatively small and unassuming fossil site located along the sinuous Snake River in southern Idaho. Its fossils date from the early half of the Pliocene and range in age from approximately 4.2 to 3 million years in age. The Monument is best known for its fossil horses. However, nearly two hundred species of animals have been recorded at Hagerman such as water and wetland birds, rodents, larger mammals, and many carnivorans. woman wearing black headscarf holding an owl on her outstretched gloved arm. A Long-Awaited New Paleontological Research Facility for Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument After many years of planning, Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument will soon see the construction of a Research and Curatorial Facility. The facility will include dedicated space for fossil preparation, which will allow visitors to observe the cleaning, repair and other conservation of Hagerman fossil specimens. architectural drawing of lab building Visiting Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Famous for its fossilized Pliocene horses, Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument offers a world-class setting to conduct research that can better enable the scientific community, the public, and land managers to understand the past. Though visitors are unlikely to see fossils in a field setting, representative fossils are on display at the visitor center in the town of Hagerman. Yellow, rocky slopes viewed from across the Snake River. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 1, Spring 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> two people standing outdoors near a fossil tree base Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring 2018 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology News</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> a piece of rock with small reddish shells embedded in it with black and white rule in foreground Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> park ranger in uniform From the Ashes: how volcanologists can help paleontologists reconstruct the ancient past at Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Although the fossils of Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument, Idaho, are sometimes treated as a single “snapshot” of geologic time, they actually represent more than a million years. U.S. Geological Survey geologist Laura Walkup has been working to uncover ash beds in the deposits to provide better age control. grass covered hills and valley Newenee: The Shoshonean Peoples of Southern Idaho Explore the connections between the Shoshonean peoples and the public lands of southern Idaho. Photo of a spatter cone under a starry night sky Who are the People Behind National Park Paleontology? Paleontology intern Emily Thorpe interviewed nine National Park Service paleontologists to understand the diverse range of responsibilities and activities these scientists undertake in their fossil-related work. photo of a person on a computer video call The Hagerman Horse (Equus simplicidens) Nearly a century ago, over 200 ancient horses were uncovered along the Snake River, instantly making Hagerman Fossil Beds one of the most important Pliocene fossil sites in the world. Today, these fossils help scientists to piece together the long evolutionary history of the horse. Painting of several zebra-like horses on the edge of an ancient lake. The American Mastodon (Mammut americanum) Long before mammoths arrived here, mastodons roamed the forests of North America. What were these enormous tusked mammals doing in ancient Idaho? How closely are they related to elephants? A herd of mastodons bathe in a lake The Bone-Crusher (Borophagus hilli) Is it a dog? A hyena? Turns out, it's neither! This unique bone-crushing creature is an extinct type of carnivore with no living relatives. Illustration of a hyena-like animal gnawing on a bone Ancient Peccary (Platygonus pearcei) In 1934, Smithsonian paleontologists uncovered a completely new species of peccary at Hagerman Fossil Beds. Illustration of an adult peccary and its two young.

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